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Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica

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The Cutting Edge

Volume XXVII, Number 3, July 2020

News and Notes | Leaps and Bounds | Germane Literature | Season's Pick | Annotate your copy

AMARYLLIDACEAE. We have just learned, pursuant to an inquiry from Manual collaborator Mario Blanco (USJ), that the name Zephyranthes grandiflora Lindl., accepted in Manual Vol. 2 (2003) for a sp. occurring in Costa Rica, is illegitimate. Embarrassingly, we had overlooked the fact that the prior name Amaryllis minuta Kunth—the epithet of which ought to have been adopted—was cited as a synonym in the protologue of Z. grandiflora. Nomenclaturally, Z. grandiflora must become a synonym of Z. minuta (Kunth) D. Dietr. (unless there exists an even older name applicable to the same sp.). However, there is also a taxonomic component to this problem: was Lindley correct in equating his proposed new sp. with Amaryllis minuta, and if not, to which entity does Costa Rican material correspond? So—at least from our benighted perspective—the correct name for our sp. is very much up in the air at present.

PORTULACACEAE (or lately, TALINACEAE). In the Manual Portulacaceae treatment, under the other Costa Rican sp. of Talinum, author José González noted that T. paniculatum (Jacq.) Gaertn. “parece ser anual ....” However, during a recent sojourn back from the southern Península de Nicoya (Cabuya) via the Amistad bridge, Manual co-PI Barry Hammel noticed, along the Carretera Interamericana just southeast of the intersection at Limonal, dense patches of a curious plant with long inflorescences of small, yellow flowers. Well, it turned out to be Talinum paniculatum, and with such strong and thick tap roots that it seems much more likely to be perennial, with only the stems dying in the dry season. See photos (vouchered by Hammel & Pérez 27770, CR) at Hammel’s Flickr site.

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