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Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica

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The Cutting Edge

Volume XIX, Number 1, January 2012

News and Notes | Leaps and Bounds | Germane Literature | Season's Pick | Annotate your copy

SEASON'S PICK: Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae) gets the nod for this season's photo essay.

Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae) Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae) Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae)

On 10 January, during an excursion to the Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Gandoca-Manzanillo, Manual co-PI Nelson Zamora (INB) had the great good fortune to encounter and collect (#5623) flowering material of the locally endemic Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae).  The flowers of this sp. were previously known only from Henri Pittier’s 1899 type collection, and Nelson’s photos (featured here) are surely the first ever taken of same.

Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae) Manilkara spectabilis (Pittier) Standl. (Sapotaceae)

Although these photos of branches and young fruits—courtesy of the large digital archive at INB—were taken by former INB curator Daniel Solano at a different season and place (6 May 2008, Parque Cariari, Prov. Limón; D. Solano et al. 5539), we include them here for a more complete picture of the sp.  At both localities, the substrate is coralline limestone, known to harbor populations of other interesting spp. [see The Cutting Edge 6(2): 1, Apr. 1999].

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