www.mobot.org Research Home | Search | Contact | Site Map  
 
Research
W³TROPICOS
QUICK SEARCH

MO PROJECTS:
Africa
Asia/Pacific
Mesoamerica
North America
South America
Floras
General Taxonomy
Photo Essays
Training in Latin
  America

MO RESEARCH:
Wm. L. Brown Center
Bryology
GIS
Graduate Studies
Research Experiences
  for Undergraduates

Imaging Lab
Library
MBG Press
Publications
Climate Change
Catalog Fossil Plants
MO DATABASES:
W³MOST
Image Index
Rare Books
Angiosperm
  Phylogeny

Res Botanica
All Databases
INFORMATION:
What's New?
People at MO
Visitor's Guide
Herbarium
Jobs & Fellowships
Symposium
Research Links
Site Map
Search

Projects

 
Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica

Main | Family List (MO) | Family List (INBio) | Cutting Edge
Draft Treatments | Guidelines | Checklist | Citing | Editors

The Cutting Edge

Volume XI, Number 2, April 2004

News and Notes | Recent Treatments | Leaps and Bounds | Germane Literature | Season's Pick | Annotate your copy

SEASON'S PICK: Souroubea vallicola Woodson ex de Roon (Marcgraviaceae)

Souroubea vallicola Woodson ex de Roon (Marcgraviaceae) Souroubea vallicola Woodson ex de Roon (Marcgraviaceae)
Souroubea vallicola Woodson ex de Roon (Marcgraviaceae) Souroubea vallicola Woodson ex de Roon (Marcgraviaceae)

photos © B. E. Hammel, vouchered by Hammel et al. 22516

The Marcgraviaceae deserve to be featured here more often. This small family (125+ spp., among 7 genera; 27 and 6, respectively in Costa Rica) is restricted to the New World tropics, and has flowers that are not only quite showy in many cases, but also display fragrances with remarkable sweetness and intensity and of somewhat unexpected mixtures (especially in the genus Souroubea). The family is easily recognized by its usually epiphytic, often scandent habit; alternate, coriaceous leaves that are rolled in bud (as in Theaceae) with poriform glands on the lower surface; and especially for its nectar-producing, large and often oddly-shaped inflorescence bracts.

Souroubea vallicola, our featured species for this season, flowers mostly during Costa Rica's dry season, from December through April, but sporadic flowering collections are known also through July, and from October. It is known from Pacific coastal mountains and lowlands to the south from San José, and from there on to Ecuador. The fragrance of this species has been described as "sweetly aromatic," and most recently as "sweetly aromatic of cinnamon and vanilla" (Hammel, pers. obs.).

TOP

 

 
 
© 1995-2014 Missouri Botanical Garden, All Rights Reserved
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299
(314) 577-5100

E-mail
Technical Support