www.mobot.org Research Home | Search | Contact | Site Map  
 
Research
W³TROPICOS
QUICK SEARCH

MO PROJECTS:
Africa
Asia/Pacific
Mesoamerica
North America
South America
General Taxonomy
Photo Essays
Training in Latin
  America

MO RESEARCH:
Wm. L. Brown Center
Bryology
GIS
Graduate Studies
Research Experiences
  for Undergraduates

Imaging Lab
Library
MBG Press
Publications
Climate Change
Catalog Fossil Plants
MO DATABASES:
W³MOST
Image Index
Rare Books
Angiosperm
  Phylogeny

Res Botanica
All Databases
INFORMATION:
What's New?
People at MO
Visitor's Guide
Herbarium
Jobs & Fellowships
Symposium
Research Links
Site Map
Search

Projects
 
Introduction


Browse by Keyword


Search


Abbreviations


Bibliography


Resources


A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Viscus,-i (s.m.II) abl. sg. visco, also viscum,-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. visco: the mistletoe; birdlime made from mistletoe berries; in Gk. ixos (s.m.II), mistletoe (Hoxanthus europaeus); birdlime “prepared from the mistletoe berry;” also oak-gum “used for the same purpose;” any sticky substance.(Liddell & Scott)].

“Bird lime is a thick, soft, tough, and sticky mass of a greenish color, has an unpleasant smell and bitter taste, melts easily on heating, and hardens when exposed in thin layers to the air.... The best quality is prepared from the inner green bark of the holly (Ilex aquifolium), which is boiled, then put in barrels, and submitted for 14 days to slight fermentation until it becomes sticky. Another process of preparing it is to mix the boiled bark with juice of mistletoe berries and burying it in the ground until fermented. The bark is then pulverized, boiled, and washed.” (1957 Fortunes in Formulas. Hiscox, G. D. & T. O’Connor Sloane, eds. Books, Inc. New York). It is best if it can be easily washed off the feathers of the birds, which birds are generally eate.

- viscum in quercu adgnasci, to grow mistletoe on an Oak tree.

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
© 1995-2017 Missouri Botanical Garden, All Rights Reserved
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299
(314) 577-5100

E-mail
Technical Support