www.mobot.org Research Home | Search | Contact | Site Map  
 
Research
W³TROPICOS
QUICK SEARCH

MO PROJECTS:
Africa
Asia/Pacific
Mesoamerica
North America
South America
General Taxonomy
Photo Essays
Training in Latin
  America

MO RESEARCH:
Wm. L. Brown Center
Bryology
GIS
Graduate Studies
Research Experiences
  for Undergraduates

Imaging Lab
Library
MBG Press
Publications
Climate Change
Catalog Fossil Plants
MO DATABASES:
W³MOST
Image Index
Rare Books
Angiosperm
  Phylogeny

Res Botanica
All Databases
INFORMATION:
What's New?
People at MO
Visitor's Guide
Herbarium
Jobs & Fellowships
Symposium
Research Links
Site Map
Search

Projects
 
Introduction


Browse by Keyword


Search


Abbreviations


Bibliography


Resources


A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
tall, high, lofty: altus,-a,-um (adj.a), celsus,-a,-um (adj.A), elatus,-a,-um (part. A), excelsus,-a,-um (adj.A), exaltus,-a,-um (part.A), grandis,-e (adj.B), ‘large, great, big, tall, lofty, grand;’ procerus,-a,-um (adj.A), ‘very high, tall; slender, long;’ comp. elatior,-ius (adj.B); superl. altissimus,-a,-um (adj.A); staturosus,-a,-um (adj.A): of great size or stature, gigantic; opp. humilis,-e (adj. B), low-growing;

- arbor procera, ligno rubrofusco (B&H), a tall tree, with a dark red wood.

- caules 18 cm. alti, stems 18 cm. high (tall).

- arbor procera, ligno durissimo, a tall tree with very hard wood.

- in montibus grandibus, in lofty mountains.

- arbores vel frutices elati, trees or shrubs high.

- caudex elatus mediocris v. humilis, trunk tall, medium or low.

- [Bocconia] herbae elatae fruticesve glaucae, succo croceo v. cinnabarino (B&H), tall, glaucous herbs or shrubs, with a saffron or cinnabar-colored sap.

Corydalis procera, sp. nov. "The Latin epithet procerus (tall) “is said of plants which are taller than their parts would have led one to expect” (Stearn 1992); Lepiota procera, the Parasol Mushroom has taller (longer) stipes than usual in the genus.

NOTE: editus,-a,-um (part.A), of places (collis, locus): high,

lofty; comparative: editior, editius; cf. upland (adj.);

- ad terram in editioribus Montium Rupestrium, on soil in

the higher places of the Rocky Mountains.

- basidiomata in editis cum Abiete lasiocarpa consociata,

basidiomes in high elevations associated with Abies

lasiocarpa.

Echinops elatus, ‘tall;’ Cirsium elatius, ‘taller;’ Rubus procerus, elongate, in reference to the canes.

somewhat taller, tallish: elatiusculus,-a,-um (adj.A).

tallest, very tall: altissimus,-a,-um (adj.A), exaltissimus,-a,-um (adj.A), praealtus,-a,-um (adj.A); grandissimus,-a,-um (adj.A).

Prenanthes altissima, ‘very tall;’ Sinosenecio elatissimus ‘tallest.’
tall, loftily: as adverb (modifying an adjective, adverb: alte (adv.), compar. altius (adv.), superl. altissime (adv); also praealte (adv.) very highly or deeply; see deeply; ‘tall’ = “exceeding the normal height” (Jackson);

1. tall, high; on high; loftily;

- filamentis alte in columnam connatis, with the filaments into a column high connate.

- caule perenni alte foliato, with the stem perennial, high foliate (with leaves high on the stem).

- lianae supra arbores altius scandentes subepiphyticae, lianas climbing higher over the trees, subepiphytic.

- caules elati, erecti vel supra arbores altissime scandentes, stems tall, erect or up the trees very highly climbing

2. deep, deeply;

- ab apice in lobos plures breves vel demum alte fissos, from the apex into many short lobes or eventually deeply divided.

- stipes altius sulcatus, stipe more deeply furrowed.

- clinandrium alte cucullatum, the clinandrium deeply cucullate.

- ovarium non alte 3-lobum, the ovary not deeply 3-lobed.

- stylus alte vel fere ad basin divisus (B&H), the style deeply or almost to the base divided.

- in rhachi dorso convexa facie alte carinata (B&H), on the dorsal rhachis with the convex face deeply carinate

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
© 1995-2017 Missouri Botanical Garden, All Rights Reserved
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299
(314) 577-5100

E-mail
Technical Support