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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Sucker, “a shoot thrown up by a plant from beneath the surface of the ground, as is common with Roses, &c.” (Lindley); “1. a shoot of subterranean origin; 2. an haustorium, sometimes restricted to the penetrating organ or papilla” (Jackson); a shoot originating from the roots or lower part of the stem of a plant and usually developing rapidly often at the expense of the plant; also, an accessory propagative shoot (WIII); to sucker is to form or send out suckers: surculus,-i (s.m.II), q.v., abl.sg. surculo; see haustorium,-ii (s.n.II), see holdfast; see offset, shoot;

- surum dicebant, ex quo per deminutionem fit surculus; they called it a surus, from which, by deminution, there may be a surculus [i.e. a sucker, a shoot].

Aerial (i.e. not subterranean) Modifications of the Stem and Branches: The Sucker: “This is a branch which arises from the stem below the surface of the earth, and which, after proceeding in a horizontal direction for a certain distance, and giving off little roots or rootlets in its course, turns upwards into the air, and ultimately forms an independent plant. Plants thus producing suckers are said to be surculose. Good examples of this kind of stem are seen in the Rose, the the Mint. The sucker can scarcely be said to differ in any essential particulars from the stolon, except that it is originally subterranean, and ultimately aerial; whereas the stolon is first aerial, and then subterranean” (Bentley); see runner or flagellum; offset; rhizome or rootstock; stolon. SEE SURCULUS

Asparagus,-i (s.m.II), q.v., abl. sg. asparago; ‘Asparagi’ = “suckers; young shoots springing from beneath the ground, and usually covered with scales” (Lindley)

Turion, q.v., a scaly sucker, q.v.; “a scaly sucker, which afterwards becomes a stem; as in Asparagus” (Lindley): turio,-onis (s.m.III), abl. sg. turione; nom. & acc. pl. turiones, dat. & abl. pl. turionibus.

NOTE: “appendices” is “an old name for suckers; such as the offsets of a Pineapple (Lindley); see appendages.

bearing suckers: surculiger,-gera,-gerum (adj.A), from surculus,-i (s.m.II), q.v..

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2018

 
 
 
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