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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Greenhouse, glasshouse: caldarium,-ii (s.n.II), abl. sg. caldario, or calidarium,-ii (s.n.II), abl. sg. calidario, 'hothouse;' tepidarium,-ii (s.n.II), abl. sg. tepidario 'moderately warm-house;' frigidarium,-ii (s.n.II), abl. sg. frigidario 'cool house;' hibernaculum,-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. hibernaculo, 'glass-house, conservatory;' see calidarium,-ii (s.n.II);

- priore minor, florens jam biennis, folia tardius autumno deponens et tepidarium per hyemem in nostris hortis requirens (DeCandolle), smaller than the preceding, flowering [till now] biennially, the leaves falling more lately in the autumn and requiring a warm greenhouse in our gardens throughout the winter.

Calidarium-ii (s.n.II), abl. sg. caldario: heated greenhouse, stove house, hot-house.

Viridarium,-ii (s.n.II): garden planted with trees, pleasure garden, flora; see garden, park.

Nostoc callidarium Wood, a blue-green fresh-water alga “Hab. Benton Springs, Owen’s Valley, California.”

NOTE: in the context of a botanical garden, ‘sub divo’ or ‘sub dio’ ‘under the open sky’ may indicate a plant was able to grow outside of a greenouse; see divum,-i (s.n.II).

NOTE: caldarium, frigidarium, tepidarium and other such words originated in the world of the Roman baths, all three refer to bathing (swimming) pools, the caldarium and tepidarium with warm water to open the pores, the frigidarium would close the pores with cold (e.g. snow) water. The hypocaustum (hypocauston),-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. hypocausto, was a ‘bathing-room heated from below, a sweating-chamber, the vaporarium,-ii (s.n.II) (Lewis & Short). The hypocausis,-is (s.f.III), abl. sg. hypocause, was the actual heating system or furnace that heated from below.

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
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