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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Galbulus, Galbule, a cone of cypress; “a strobilus, whose scales are fleshy, and combined into a uniform mass” (Lindley); a fruit formed by the Combination of several flowers [> L. galbulus,-i (s.m.II), the nut of the cypress-tree (Lewis & Short): galbulus,-i (s.m.II), abl. sg. galbulo, nom. pl. glabuli, dat. & abl. pl. galbulis; see cone, strobilus,-i (s.m.II).

“No other kind of fruits except the Cone and Galbulus are found in the natural orders Coniferae and Cycadaceae.” (Bentley).

“The Galbulus. “This fruit is but a modification of the Cone: differing only in being more or less rounded in form instead of somewhat conical, and in having the heads of the scales much enlarged. It is seen in the cypress, and in the Juniper. In the latter the scales become fleshy, and are united together into one mass, so that it somewhat resembles at first sight a berry, but its nature is at once seen by examining the apex, when three radiating lines will be observed corresponding to the three fleshy scales of which the fruit is formed, and which are here but imperfectly united” (Bentley).

“A kind of cone, in which the bracteae are enlarged at top, form a sphere, and scarcely open when ripe. Cupressus.” (S.Gray).

“Members of the cypress family [Taxodiaceae] (cypresses, arborvitae, junipers, redwoods, etc.) differ [from strobili] in that the bract and seed scales are fully fused, with the bract visible as no more than a small lump or spine on the scale. The botanical term galbulus (plural galbuli; from the Latin for a cypress cone) is sometimes used instead of strobilus for members of this family” (Wikipedia).

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
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