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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Drupe, stone fruit, “a one-seeded indehiscent fruit having a hard bony endocarp, a usually fleshy mesocarp, and a thin epicarp like a skin (as in the cherry, plum, and peach) or dry and almost leathery (as in the almond) - called also a ‘stone fruit’ (WIII); “a fleshy or succulent fruit, with a bony putamen or lining, as a Plum [Prunus]” (Lindley); “a stone-fruit; the pericarp fleshy or leathery, containing a stone with a kernel” (Jackson): drupa,-ae (s.f.I), abl. sg., nom. pl. drupae, acc. pl. drupas, dat. & abl. pl. drupis, lit. 'an over-ripe wrinkled olive' [> L. drupa,-ae (s.f.I, druppa,-ae (s.f.I) ‘overripe olive’ > Gk. dryppa (s.f.I), ‘olive’];

- drupa ovoidea clavata v. fusiformis, exocarpio tenui, endocarpio crasso lignoso subosseo (B&H), the drupe ovoid, club-shaped or fusiform [i.e. spindle-shaped] with the exocarp thin, with the endocarp thick, woody, somewhat bony.

- drupa globosa v. late ovoidea, infra medium calycis tubo annulata, atra, 2-3-pyrena, epicarpio suberoso sicco pulvere atro v. rubro farcto (B&H); drupe globose or broadly ovoid, below the middle of the calyx by a tube annulate, black 2-3-pyrenous, with a corky epicarp, when dry packed with a black or red powder.

- drupa pisiformis, 5-pyrena, carne lacunosa oleo repleta (B&H), drupe pea-shaped, with 5 pyrenes, with the flesh chambered, full with oil.

- drupa carnosa, ovata, putamine osseo, loculo e processu dependente (B&H), drupe fleshy, ovate, with the stone bony, with the locule hanging from a process.

- drupae reniformes v. rotundae, the drupes kidney-shaped or rounded.

- drupae ovali-oblongae, valde lateraliter compressa (B&H), drupes oval-oblong, strongly laterally compressed.

- drupae subglobosae; putamen osseum, drupes subglobose; the putamen bony.

- drupae stipitatae, stipitibus basi connatis (B&H), drupes stalked, with the stalks fused at the base.

- drupa pisi semine minor (F. Mueller), the drupe smaller than the seed of a pea.

- drupa tetrapyrena nuda. Pyrenae nucamentaceae monospermae (F. Mueller), the drupe 4-pyrenous naked. The pyrenes like nutlets [i.e. in hardness], with one seed.

- drupa carnea stylo acuminata ad trientem calyce inclusa, sarcocarpio viscossimo, putamine ruguloso biloculari ovato 1-2-spermo leviter compresso margine subcarinato, emarginatura apicis bidentata (F. Mueller), drupe flesh-colored, acuminate with the style, embedded to one third with the calyx, with the sarcocarp extremely viscous, with the putamen with little wrinkles, bilocular, 1-2-seeded, slightly compressed, with the margin somewhat keeled, with the notch of the apex bidentate [i.e. with two teeth].

Naucum,-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. nauco: “(obsol.) the fleshy part of a drupe” (Lindley).

False Drupe, “a nutlike fruit where the lower persistent part of the perianth becomes fleshy, as in Neea” [Saltwood; Nyctaginaceae](Jackson); Spurous drupe, “(obsol.) any fleshy body enclosing a stone” (Lindley); “any fleshy body enclosing a stone” (Jackson): drupa spuria (adj.A), nom. pl. drupae spuriae.

“The false drupa, (drupa spuria). The yew, Taxus baccata, bears a nut that is half sunk in the fleshy receptacle, and thus appears like a drupa. This is the case likewise with the Anacardium and Semicarpus”(Willdenow). Semecarpus Anacardium L.f., with a two-part fruit, a red-orange accessory fruit and a black fleshy drupe that grows at the end: a receptacle and the nut.

NOTE: the stone or woody endocarp of a drupe is the putamen,-inis (s.n.III), q.v.;

- drupae ovoideae; putamen facie interna concaviusculum, processu intruso hemisphaerico (B&H), drupes ovoid; the putamen on the inner face somewhat concave, with a hemispheric inserted process;

- drupa depresso-globosa, putamine 6-7-loculato osseo (F. Mueller), the drupe depressed-globose, with the putamen with 6-7 locules, bony.

NOTE: although the pyrene may be the stone or pit of a drupe or drupelet, as in the fruit of the huckleberry, it may also be more general: a small, hard nutlet: pyrena,-ae (s.f.I), abl. sg. pyrena;

- “fruits are drupaceous, containing several to many pyrenes (spp. of Timonius, Rubiaceae):” fructus drupaceus, aliquot vel plures pyrenas continens, fruit like a drupe, .

NOTE: Ossiculum,-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. ossiculo: a small bone, an ossicle; ossiculum “(obsol.) a drupe” (Lindley); “the pyrene of a fruit, as a medlar” (Jackson) [medlar = Mespilus germanica (Rosaceae)]; the pyrene, q.v., is the stone or pit of a drupe or drupelet, as in the fruit of the huckleberry; a small, hard nutlet;

- Drupa, compresso-ovata. Ossiculum, fibris lignosis intertextum, in quo nucleus (Necker); drupe compressed-ovate. the Ossiculum [i.e. pyrene] interwoven with woody fibers, in which [is] the nucleus [nutlet].

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
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