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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Coccule, a small berry: cocculum,-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. cocculo, less correctly, cocculus,-i (s.m.II), abl. sg. cocculo (dim. of L. coccum,-i (s.n.II), not > Gk. kokkos, which would be coccidium,-i (s.n.II)]; see coccus,-i (s.m.II).

Cocculus,-i (s.m.II; not a genus), or cocculus indicus (adj.A): “the very poisonous bean-shaped berry of a woody vine (Anamiria cocculus) of the East Indies that yields picrotoxin and is used locally to stupefy fishes and in an ointment to control vermin” (WIII).

Cocculus,-i (s.m.II), Coralbeads, “An old name, a diminutive of coccus, a berry” (Fernald 1950); Cocculus,-i (s.m.II), abl. sg. Cocculo, “Coralbeads”, a generic name, the dim. of coccus, from the red drupes as large as a small pea (Fernald 1950). Moonseed, snail-seed, coral beads. From the diminutive of Gk. kokkos, a berry; in allusion to the fruits of these evergreen climbers or shrubs. Menispermaceae” (Stearn 1996): C. carolinus (L.) DC., a plant with a red drupe that is as large as a small pea (Fernald 1950).

[Anamirta paniculata]—The fruit of this plant, which is known as Cocculus indicus, is poisonous. It has been extensively employed for a long period as a poison for taking fish and game, which it stupefies. It is also reputed to be used to a great extent (chiefly by publicans) to impart a bitter taste to malt liquor, and to increase its intoxicating effects; but it must be admitted that we have no very satisfactory evidence on this point. The average annual imports of Cocculus indicus from India are about 50.000 lbs., a quantity, it is said, sufficient to drug 120,000 tuns of beer. It has been also employed externally to destroy vermin, and for the cure of some skin diseases” (Bentley).

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
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