www.mobot.org Research Home | Search | Contact | Site Map  
 
Research
W³TROPICOS
QUICK SEARCH

MO PROJECTS:
Africa
Asia/Pacific
Mesoamerica
North America
South America
General Taxonomy
Photo Essays
Training in Latin
  America

MO RESEARCH:
Wm. L. Brown Center
Bryology
GIS
Graduate Studies
Research Experiences
  for Undergraduates

Imaging Lab
Library
MBG Press
Publications
Climate Change
Catalog Fossil Plants
MO DATABASES:
W³MOST
Image Index
Rare Books
Angiosperm
  Phylogeny

Res Botanica
All Databases
INFORMATION:
What's New?
People at MO
Visitor's Guide
Herbarium
Jobs & Fellowships
Symposium
Research Links
Site Map
Search

Projects
 
Introduction


Browse by Keyword


Search


Abbreviations


Bibliography


Resources


A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Cephalodium, “a knob-like shield [i.e. apothecium], such as occurs in the genus Scyphophorus. The capitulum of Composites” (Lindley); “an irregular growth from or within a lichen thallus in which there is an alga other than that natural to the lichen” (Ainsworth & Bisby); “a term first used by Acharius (1803) to designate certain globose lichen apothecia but now restricted to those gall-like outgrowths which are in organic connection with the thallus but which contain one or more algae of different type from the one present in the gonidial zone” (S&D): cephalodium,-ii (s.n.II), abl. sg. cephalodio, nom. & acc. pl. cephalodia, dat. & abl. pl. cephalodiis;

- [lichen] ita simile est Stereocaulo stricto, ut cum eodem jungerem, nisi obstaret textura cephalodiorum ; haec laeviuscula (parum scrobiculato-impressa) (Nyl.), similar in this way is Stereocaulon strictum, such that I might have joined it with the same, except texture of the cephalodia would oppose it; this [i.e. the texture] is almost smooth, somewhat scrobiculate-impressed.

- [Calicium; lichen] in thallo C. chrysocephali (e Fontainebleau) cephalodia vidi carnea convexa apothecia biatorina simulantia, textura dense cellulosa et globules oleosos copiose continente (Nyl.), in the thallus of Calicium chrysocephalum (according to Fontainebleau) I see fleshy, convex cephalodia simulating biatorine apothecia, with a densely cellulose texture and copiously containing oil globules.

-[Pilophoron; lichen] cephalodia saepe tuberculosa testacea vel testaceo-fuscescentia podetiis sparse adnata, intus dense minute cellulosa et stratum offerentia e granulis gonimis viridi-coerulescentibus breviter ellipsoideis vel subglobosis glomerulose dispositis vel moniliformi-junctis (Nyl.), the cephalodia often tuberculose, brownish-red or brownish-red becoming blackish-brown, here and there adnate to the podetia, inside densely, minutely cellulose and presenting a layer composed of greenish-blue gonimic [i.e. green-alga] granules which are shortly ellipsoid or almost globose, arranged in glomerules or moniliformly joined together.

- [Pilophoron aciculare; lichen] cephalodia pallide olivácea subgloboso-tuberculosa, granulis gonimis sat minutis (diam. 0,003-5 millim.) viridi-coerulescenlibus in glomerulos magnos congestis et invicem saepius moniliformi- junctis. (Nyl.), the cephalodia pale olive, almost globose to tuberculose, with the gonimic [i.e. blue-green algal] granules quite minute (0,003-5 millim. in diameter) and alternately more often moniliformly joined up.

- [Stereocaulon; lichen] cum cephalodiis simul soredia haud raro occurrunt, podetiis capitula albido-pulverulenta terminalia sistentia. Paucis speciebus cephalodia haud visa (Nyl.), the soredia together with the cephalodia hardly rarely occur, the whitish-powdery terminal capitula appearing with the podetia. With a few species the cephalodia are not seen.

- [lichen] Cephalodia erecta clavata (saepius plura congesta vel subfasciculata) stipitellata, parte supera caesio-cinerascente rugulosa (subreticulatim rugulosa); stratum gonidiale granula gonima offert oblonga vel formae variae 3-4 vel plura connata fere ut in Ephebe (Nyl.), the cephalodia erect, clavate (more often many, congested or somewhat fasciculate), on a small stipe [or stalk], with the upper part bluish-whitish-gray, wrinkled (almost reticulately wrinkled; the gonidial layer displays a gonimous granule, oblong or of various shapes, 3-4-or more, connate almost as in Ephebe.

- TABULA VII, fig.8 : noduli gelatinosi strati gonimi cephalodii sex, aucti diam. 275. (Nyl.), table 7, figure 8, gelatinous nodules of the gonimous [i.e. algal] layer of the cephalodium six, enlarged by 275 in diameter.

- [lichen] mirum cephalodia hic, aeque ac in Pilophoris et in Argopsi, systema gonimon sistere omnino diversum a gonidiis thalli, ita ut cephalodia his elementis anatomicis eorum (Nyl.), it is remarkable that the cephalodia here, just as much as in Pilophorum and in Argopsis, display a gonimous system in every way different from the gonidia of the thallus, in such a way that the cephalodia appears with these anatomical elements of those.

- cephalodia nulla visa (Nyl.), no cephalodia seen.

- TABULA VII, fig. 11: noduli bini gelatinosi strati gonimi cephalodii, aucti 275 diam. (Nyl.), Table 7, figure 11: the nodules of the gonimous layer of the cephalodium two apiece, gelatinous, enlarged 275 diameters.

- [Stereocaulon: lichen] cephalodia vetusta subglobosa encephaloideo-corrugata anguste stipitellata vel subsessilia (umbilicato-adfixa) (Nyl.), the old cephalodia nearly globose, encephaloid-corrugated, narrowly stipitellate or nearly sessile.

- [lichen] stratum gonimon cephalodiorum jam fere evanescens, jam copiosum (Nyl.), the gonimous layer of the cephalodia at one time almost passing away, at another copious.

- [Stereocaulon; lichen] cephalodia sessilia glomeruliformia vel verrucosa saepissime discolora et faciei heterogéneae (Nyl.), the cephalodia sessile, shaped like a glomerule or verrucose, most often variously colored and of a heterogeneous appearance.





 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
© 1995-2017 Missouri Botanical Garden, All Rights Reserved
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299
(314) 577-5100

E-mail
Technical Support