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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
call-, calli-, callo-; also cal-, cali-, calo- [see note]: -callis, gen.sg. -callidis (s.f.III): in Gk. comp., beautiful, elegant, fine; blessed; adorned, as with beautiful things or attributes [> Gk. calli-, in Gk. comps. “gives the additional idea of beautiful to the simple word” (Liddel & Scott); > Gk. kallos,-eos (s.n.III), beauty, a beautiful object, also kalon, (s.n.II) > kalos,-E,-on (adj.) beautiful, fair; = Lat. pulcher,-ra,-rum (adj.A).

NOTE: the superlative of the Gk. adjective is kallistos,-E,-on > callistos.

NOTE: in compounds with the double ‘ell’ (call-): typically if both elements in a compound are Greek, then the notion is ‘beautiful.’ If both are Latin, then the notion of ‘thick, hardened, callose, callous’ is intended [> callus,-i (s.m.II), q.v., a callus or hardening]. Latin does not have a word ‘call-‘ or ‘cal-‘ meaning ‘beautiful.’

- callianthus, with beautiful flowers; callibotryus, with beautiful clusters; callicarpus, with beautiful fruits; callichromus or callichrous, beautifully colored.

NOTE: cal-, cali-, calo-: in Gk. comp.: kalli- is “the first part in compounds, where the notion of ‘beautiful’ is added to the simple notion: kalo- is later and less common: sometimes “like a mere adj. with its substantive, as kallipais = kalE pais.” (Liddell & Scott);

- calochromus, beautifully colored; caloneurus, beautifully nerved; calophlebius, beautifully veined; calophyllus, with beautiful leaves.

Caladenia, R. Brown. From kalos, beautiful, and aden, a gland ; in reference to the disc of the labellum being finely beset with glands (Paxton).

Calamintha, ,-ae (s.f.I): the “old generic name meaning ‘beautiful mint’” (Fernald, 1950, now Satureja calamintha (L.) Scheele).

Calonyction. The circumstance of the flowers opening at night has suggested the derivation of the generic name, from kalos, beautiful, and nyx, night. (Paxton).

Calopogon,-onis (s.m.III) R. Br., > Gk. calos, beautiful + pogon, beard; Ptychostomum calophyllum, > Gk. calos, beautiful + phyllum, leaf.

Calothrix,-icis (s.f.III)”The name applies to the beauty of the filaments; and is taken from kalos, beautiful, and thrix, a hair” (Paxton).

Ptychostomum calophyllum, a species of moss with vivid red leaf borders and costa.

NOTE: in compounds with the double ‘ell’ (call-): typically if both elements in a compound are Greek, then the notion is ‘beautiful.’ If both are Latin, then the notion of ‘thick, hardened, callose, callous’ is intended [> callus,-i (s.m.II), q.v., a callus or hardening]. Latin does not have a word ‘call-‘ or ‘cal-‘ meaning ‘beautiful.’

Nouns ending in -callis,-idis (s.f.III):

Drymocallis (s.f.III), abl. sg.. Drymocallide, Wood beauty. Fom Gk. drymos, woods, and callos, beauty.

Hemerocallis (s.f.III), abl. sg. Hemerocalle. From hemera, a day, and callos, beauty; alluding to the beauty and duration of the flowers(Paxton); from the large flowers "collapsing and decaying after expending for a single day" (Fernald 1950).

Hymenocallis (s.f.III) Salisb. (the epithets have feminine endings) from Gk. hymen, a membrane and callos, beauty, from the delicate texture of the perianth; from the "beautiful membrane which connects the filaments;” “It refers to the curious shape of the flowers, which consist of six narrow, curved petals attached to a shallow cup that is formed from the fused stamens. The effect is of a spidery daffodil or lily, thus explaining the common name “spider lily” (Wikipedia “Hymenocallis” June 2017)

Petrocallis (s.f.III), abl. sg. Petrocalle. > Gk. petros, rock + kallis, beauty; “from the habitat and the beauty of the flowers” (Stearn 1996); Petrocallis. From petros, a rock, and calos, beautiful; the plant adorns the rocks on which it grows. (Paxton).

NOTE: the following passages indicate the genitive sg. in compounds in -callis,-idis. This is a feminine noun suffix;

- [Draba] semina biseriata, immarginata, funiculis setaceis (in Petrocallide septo adnatis) (B&H), seeds in two rows, lacking a border, with the funiculus bristle-like (in Petrocallis adnate to the septum).

- [fungi] praeamare videtur scapos foliaque plantarum Liliacearum exaridarum, v. c. Hemerocallidis fulvae (S&A), it seems to love above all the dried out scapes and leaves of Liliaceous plants, for example, Hemmerocallis fulva.

- Habitus omnino Petrocallidis pyrenaicae (Boissier), the habit is completely that of Petrocallis pyrenaica.

Callicarpa,-ae L. (s.f.I), Beauty-berry, from Gk. callos, beauty and carpos, fruit;

Callicladium,-i Crum (s.n.II), a pleurocarpous moss with beautiful (calli-) branches (-cladium);

Callirhoe Nutt. (s.f.I) (Malvaceae): [> Gk. kallirroos,-ov (adj.), also kalliroos ‘beautiful-flowing,’ a metaphore of the flute; KallirroE was a spring at Athens (Liddell & Scott).

Callistemon,-onis (s.m.III). The name refers to the beautiful scarlet colour of the stamens of some species; and is derived from kallistos, beautiful, and stemon, a stamen. (Paxton).

Callistemma,-atis (s.n.III). The name refers to the beautiful flowers; and is derived from callistos, prettiest, and stemma, a, crown (Paxton),

Callistachys,-ydis (s.f.III). The name is expressive of the fine spikes of flowers; and is derived from kalos, beautiful, and stachys, a spike (Paxton).

Callithaume,-ae (s.f.I). From kalos, beautiful, and thauma, a thing to be admired. (Paxton).

Callitriche,-ae (s.f.I) > Gk. callos, beautiful, and thrix, hair, in allusion to the slender stems.
call-, calli-: in L. comp. thick, hardened, callose, callous [> L. callum,-i (s.n.II), the thick, tough or hardened skin of animal bodies; hardness (Lewis & Short];

- foliolis utrinque fere 80 confertis angusto-linearibus inferne subtetragonis superne canaliculatis basi vix calligeris (F. Mueller), with the leaflets on both sides almost 80, close together, narrowly linear, below nearly 4-angled, above canaliculate, scarcely callus-bearing at the base.

Callicostella, a genus of mosses with a robust, double costa in the leaves, “nervis callosis,” with thick nerves.

NOTE: not to be confused with Gk. call-, calli-, ‘beautiful. In compounds with the double ‘ell’ (call-): typically if both elements in a compound are Greek, then the notion is ‘beautiful.’ If both are Latin, then the notion of ‘thick, hardened, callose, callous’ is intended [> callus,-i (s.m.II), q.v., a callus or hardening]. Latin does not have a word ‘call-‘ or ‘cal-‘ meaning ‘beautiful.’

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
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