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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
caeduus,-a,-um (adj.A): “that can be cut without injury, fit for cutting, [as silva (forest or woods)] (Lewis & Short) [> L. caedo, cecidi, caesum 3. to cut, hew, cut down, fell];

- [fungus] In [var. g], loco humido caeduo semel lecta Septembri, flocci volvae diruptae superstites in pileo ac stipite cernuntur(S&A), in var. g., in a moist place ‘suitable for cutting’ [i.e. coppice or copse wood] once collected in September, the surviving flocci of the shattered volva discerned on the pileus and stipe.

- [Riccia minima] in Juguli Plebania per sylvam caeduam, Castaneis consitam Ascetriarum Divi Felicis, & alibi in eodem territorio (Mich.), in Plebania Juguli throughout the cutting-wood [coppice-wood], planted to the Castaneae of the nuns of the of the God Felix [i.e. happiness, joy, cheerfulness; of fertility, prosperity; (as male) the God, the Lucky One], and elsewhere in the same region.

Silva,-ae (s.f.I) caedua (adj.A): “In the civil law. That kind of wood which was kept for the purpose of being cut In English law. Under wood; coppice wood. 2 Inst 642; Cowell. All small wood and under timber, and likewise timber when cut down, under twenty years’ growth; titheable wood” [The Law.com Dictionary March 25, 2018).

Coppice, copse: A small wood, consisting of underwood, which may be cut at twelve or fifteen years’ growth for fuel.

NOTE: Boscage: “In English law. The food which wood and trees yield to cattle; browse wood, mast, etc. Spelman. An ancient duty of wind fallen wood in the forest. Manwood” [TheLaw.com Law Dictionary & Black's Law Dictionary 2nd Ed.]

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2018

 
 
 
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