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ORNAMENTAL PLANTS OF HORTICULTURE VALUE

Selection of perennials

Gentiana L.
Gentian
Gentianaceae

Gentiana
About 300-800 species, depending on classification. Temperate and arctic regions, montane elsewhere. About 65 species in the FSU, including Gentianella, and about 40 species of Gentiana s. str. There are representatives of different sections: 7 species belong to the section Cruciata, 4 to the section Frigida, 2 to the section Gentiana, 2 to the section Megalanthe. Some species have long been in cultivation, e.g. G. lutea L. and G. punctata L. (because of their medicinal properties), G. asclepiadea L., G. clusii Perr. et Song., G. cruciata L., G. dahurica Fisch., G. decumbens L. f., G. lagodechiana (Kusn.) Grossh. and G. septemfida Pall. Some species have been investigated and recommended as prospective garden plants, among them those described below.

G. dshimilensis C. Koch (sect. Chondrophylla)

Caucasus, Anatolia and Balkan Peninsula. In meadows in the alpine zone.

Rhizome with numerous stems 3-8 cm. Rosette leaves lanceolate, 7-11 cm long; flowers solitary, bright violet, 2-4 cm long, sessile. V - mid spring to early autumn. Fl - June-August depending on locality and elevation. Fr - in July-October. Pr - by seed. Requires a sunny position, humid air and limestone soil. Suffers from excessive water in winter. Well suited for the rock garden. Z 4. New.

A closely related species is G. grandiflora Laxm. from southern Siberia and adjacent Central Asia. A low-growing plant (2-4 cm) with numerous, large (2.0-2.5 cm), dark blue flowers.

G. kolakovskyi Doluch. (sect. Pneumonanthe)

Caucasus (southwestern regions). In meadows and on rocky slopes in the subalpine zone.

Rhizome thick, vertical. Stems numerous, 15-40 cm, erect or ascending, leafy. Leaves sessile, ovate or elongated, 3- veined, 30 (45) mm x 3-4 mm. Flowers solitary, terminal, campanulate, 50 mm long, 10 mm wide, bright blue. V - mid-spring till mid-autumn. Fl - July-August in the wild. Fr - August-September, not every year. P - by seed. Requires a humus-rich soil and a partially shaded site. Z 5 (4). New.

G. fischeri P. A. Smirn. (sect. Pneumonanthe)

Siberia (southern Altay and Dzungaria).

Stems numerous, erect, leafy, 50 cm. Lower leaves scale-like, upper leaves oblong-ovate, 5 cm long. Flowers in dense terminal clusters, campanulate, dark blue, interior green-spotted. V - mid-spring to late autumn. Fl - late summer (August in the wild). Can grow in sunny and partially shaded sites, requires a moist soil. P - by seed. Z 5 (4). New.

The following are also of gardening interest:
G. owerinii (Kusn.) Grossh. (sect. Pneumonanthe). Dagestan. Flowers in dense terminal, 4-8-flowered clusters, bright blue-violet. V - mid spring to late autumn. Fl - July. Fr - October, not every year.
G. paradoxa Albov (sect. Pneumonanthe). Southwestern Caucasus. Flowers solitary, yellow-blue, almost brown. V - mid spring to late autumn. Fl - August- September. Fr - October. Both species can be propagated by seed. They require a humus-rich soil, and partial shade. Z 5.

SELECTION OF PERENNIALS
 
 
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