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ORNAMENTAL PLANTS OF HORTICULTURE VALUE

Selection of perennials

Fritillaria L.
Fritillary
Liliaceae

About 100 species, mainly in the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, of which 24 in the FSU (Caucasus, Central Asia and the Far East). Almost all have been tested.

F. caucasica Adams

Fritillaria
Caucasus and northeastern Turkey. In open forests, on dry slopes and in scrub.

Bulb white, of 2 fleshy scales, 2-3 cm diam. Flowering stem 25-40 cm high. Leaves 3-4 from the middle of the stem, 8 cm x 2.5 cm, grey-green. Flowers pendulous, campanulate, dark purple or reddish-violet. V -April to June. Fl - March in the wild, in St. Petersburg May, for 2-3 weeks. Fr - June. P - by daughter bulbs or by seed. Tolerants of a semi-shaded position and moderate dry soil. Z 5 (4). New.

F. latifolia Willd.

Caucasus and northeastern Turkey. On grassy slopes in subalpine and alpine zones.

Bulb about 2 cm diam. Leafy stem 20-30 cm. Leaves 5-7, wide-lanceolate. Flowers solitary, large, checkered. V - early spring-late summer. Fl - mid spring to mid summer. Fr - late summer. Tolerants of a semi-shaded position and moderate dry soil. Z 5 (4).

F. pallidiflora Schrenk

Central Asia (Tarbagatay, Dzshungarskiy Alatau). On grassy slopes in subalpine zone.

Bulb 3.5-4.0 cm diam. Leafy stem 20-40 (-70) cm. Leaves numerous, 10 x 2.5-4 cm, grey green, oblong-lanceolate. Flowers 5-10, campanulate, 3.5 cm long, pale yellow, in panicle on top of the stem. V - early spring to late summer. Fl - Mid spring (May in St. Petersburg). Fr - mid summer. P - by seed and daughter bulbs. Self-sowing plant if planted in a semi-shaded place. Can grow in full sun also. Z 4.

F. ussuriensis Maxim.

Far East (southern regions). In wet meadows, on moist sandy soil.

Bulb small (2cm). Stem 50-60 cm leafy in middle and upper parts. Leaves 10-15 cm long, verticillate. Flowers solitary large (3.5 cm), perianth narrowly campanulate, brownish-violet outside, purple and checkered inside with yellowish tipped. V - early spring to late autumn. Fl - mid spring. Fr - late summer. P - by seed and daughter bulbs. Requires a moist place, but not stagnant water. Z 6 (5).

Also of garden interest are the following:

F. grandiflora Grossh.

Caucasus (Talysh) . In forest on cliffs, rare.

Flowers large (5-6 cm), solitary, brown-purple, checkered. Very attractive. Z 6 (5). New.

F. meleagris L.

Fritillaria meleagris
European part of FSU, western Siberia and Europe. In moist meadows, in clearings.

Flowers large (3-5 cm), solitary, dark purple, pink or white, checkered. Z 4.

F. meleagroides Patrin ex Schult. et Schult. fil.

European part of the FSU (southeastern regions), Caucasus, western Siberia, steppes of Central Asia and southwestern Europe. In meadows, along stream, sometimes on saline soil.

Flowers 2-3 cm, solitary, dark brown-violet, obscurely chekered. Z 5 (4). New.

F. olgae Vved.

Central Asia (Kugitang, Zerawshan). In juniper forest, on grassy slopes.

Flowers 1-5, 3 cm long, yellow-green. Requires dry soil and a sunny position. Z 6 (5). New.

F. orientalis Adams.

Caucasus (the Greater Caucasian Range). In alpine meadows.

Flowers 2-4 cm, solitary, dark purple, yellowish inside. Z 5 (4). New.

F. ruthenica Wikstr.

European part of the FSU, western Siberia, Kazakstan. Steppe, rocky slopes.

Flowers 1-5, 3-3.5 cm, dark red, obscurely checkered. Z 5 (4).

SELECTION OF PERENNIALS
 
 
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