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ORNAMENTAL PLANTS OF HORTICULTURE VALUE

Selection of perennials

Frankenia L.
Frankenia, sea-heath
Frankeniaceae

25 to 60 species, depending on classification. In subtropical regions of Europe, America, Asia and Australia. 8 species in the FSU, mainly in Central Asia, also in southern Russia and southern Siberia.

F. bucharica Basil.

Central Asia (Karakum, Pamiro Alay, Tien Shan) and western China. On saline soil, on solonchak (extra saline soil), in wet meadows and along streams and lake shores.

Small, subshrubby prostrate evergreen plant, 20-35 cm. Stems branched, numerous. Leaves fleshy, ovate, dull green, 1-2 cm x 0.5-0.7 cm. Flowers small but numerous in branched axillary racemes, white or pink. V - early spring to late autumn. Fl - in the wild May-June. Fr - July-October. P - by seed, division and cuttings. Can grow on saline soil. Z. 6. New.

Also adapted to extreme conditions are the following species unknown in cultivation:
F. hirsuta L. -stems numerous, ascending or erect.
F. mironovii Botsch. - stems procumbent, numerous.
F. transkaratavica Botsch. - stems erect, branched in the upper parts.
F. tuvinica Lomonosova - stems numerous, branched from the middle parts.
F. vvedenskyi Botsch.- stems slightly ascending, flowers numerous.
They also differ in distribution areas, and vary in inflorescence structure (axillary or terminal), flower colour (white, pink) etc. All species can grow in areas belonging to USDA zones 6 or 5. F. tuvinica grows in zone 4.

SELECTION OF PERENNIALS
 
 
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