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THE ORIGIN OF GARDEN PLANTS AND THE FSU CONTRIBUTION

The European Center


The European Center embraces some of the Circumboreal areas of the Temperate zone of Europe. Although not mentioned by Vavilov, this area is important as a source of ornamental plants. It involves the Atlantic European, Central European, and Eastern European floristic provinces the last of which encompasses a portion of the former Soviet Union territory. At least 300 (6%) of ornamental species are native to Europe. Many well-known trees have been in cultivation since very ancient times. For instance, lindens or limes (Tilia platyphyllos, T. cordata, and T. europaea) have long been considered as the favourite trees for lining the avenues in the great cities in Europe. The Norway Maple (Acer platanoides) and sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) are both native to Europe. These maples are two of the most widely planted shade trees, because both are considered to be among the hardiest trees in cultivation. Some other trees e.g. birches (Betula pendula etc.), hornbeam (Carpinus betulus), European beech (Fagus sylvatica), European ash (Fraxinus excelsior), English oak (Quercus robur), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), European larch (Larix decidua) and the common yew (Taxus baccata), are also of European origin. Some garden herbaceous perennials, well known in cultivation, occur in the wild in Europe, mostly in mountainous areas and forests. Some examples are Adonis vernalis, common daisy (Bellis perennis), horned violet (Viola cornuta) and sweet violet (Viola odorata).

THE ORIGIN OF GARDEN PLANTS
 
 
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