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THE ORIGIN OF GARDEN PLANTS AND THE FSU CONTRIBUTION

The Australian Center


The Australian Center, including both the Northeast and the Southwest Australian Floristic Regions, and Neozeylandic Region of Holantarctic Kingdom, is not notable as a source of cultivated plants, but of importance for ornamentals. Some 100 (about 2% ) ornamental species have been obtained from this region. It is the home of the umbrella tree (Brassaia actiniphylla syn. Schefflera), Eucalyptus, Casuarina, Callistemon and other plants that do well in the countries with Mediterranean climate, and they are grown mostly under glass in northern zones. New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax) is more or less hardy in all but the coldest areas. Some herbaceous species have come from Australia, including the swan river daisy (Brachycome iberidifolia), everlastings Helichrysum bracteatum, Ammobium alatum and others. The first Australian plants were brought to Europe by the captain Cook expedition in 1769. Two European botanists, Joseph Banks and Daniel Solande, took part in this expedition to Australia and brought back a huge herbarium and seeds of many new and interesting species. In addition to the species mentioned above, they were able to procure some new acacias (Acacia longiflora).

THE ORIGIN OF GARDEN PLANTS
 
 
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