Revised State and County Checklist of the Mosses of Wyoming, U.S.A. M–Z.

P. M. Eckel

Res Botanica

1-MossesWyoIntro.htm

August 22, 2013

 

 

REVISED STATE AND COUNTY CHECKLIST OF

THE MOSSES OF WYOMING, U.S.A.:

M–Z

 

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MEESIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 173, plate 41, figs. 6–9. 1801, name conserved  (Meesiaceae)

Meesia uliginosa Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 173. 1801   (Meesiaceae)  unillo

 

Meesia trichodes Spruce

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol.28, 2014).

 

(As Meesia trichodes Spruce) Boggy places near Fox Park, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 9055), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: Boggy places, Fox Park, Medicine Bow Mountains, Aven Nelson 9055 (RM).

 

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MEIOTRICHUM (G. L. Smith) G. L. Smith, Bryologist 95: 271. 1992  (Polytrichaceae)

Polytrichastrum sect. Meiotrichum G. L. Smith, Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 21(3): 40. 1971

 

Meiotrichum lyallii (Mitten) G. L. Smith, Bryologist 95: 271. 1992

Polytrichadelphus lyallii Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 49, plate 8. 1864      (Polytrichaceae)

 

Oligotrichum lyallii (Mitt.) Lindb.

Polytrichastrum lyallii (Mitt.) G. L. Smith

Polytrichum angustidens H. Lindb.

Polytrichum lyallii (Mitt.) Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Polytrichastrum lyallii (Mitt.) G.L.Smith Teton Co., Spence 1985). ...throughout the Pacific Northwest; Yukon, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico. Albany, Carbon cos., Yellowstone Natl. Pk., Porter, 1937. (As Polytrichum lyallii) “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981.

 

(As Polytrichum lyallii: all) CARBON CO.: Medicine Bow Range, C.L. Porter 9699 (RM); Sierra Madre Range, 9600-10,000 ft., wet area by bog, Kastning-Culp 700 (BUF, RM). FREMONT CO: , on US26 & US287, 5 miles E of Togwotee Pass, S slope. Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000'. Open Pine-Spruce woods, xeric, in duff on slope, some Artemisia tridentata.fr. July 6, 1985, Eckel 94082002 (BUF,RM). PARK CO.: 2900 msm, W.A. Weber B-44239 (COLO, RM). SHERIDAN CO., 7800' (limestone area), Dueholm 8248 (RH).

 

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Mnium affine: see Plagiomnium affine.

 

Mnium ambiguum H. Müll. = Mnium lycopodioides Schwägrichen

 

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MNIUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 188, plate 45. 1801, name conserved (Mniaceae)

 

Mnium arizonicum J. J. Amann, Rev. Bryol. 52: 23. 1925 (Mniaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming , “this is the only Mnium with pitted cell walls” (McIntosh & Newmaster, FNA Vol. 28, 2014); it has no plagiotropic stems in sterile shoots (unlike Plagiomnium spp.); the bright green laminae contrast with the red stems, little tomentum, leaves strongly twisted around the stems. Unlike Plagiomnium ellipticumm, (with plagiotropic stems) the leaves are obovate and acute (not nearly orbicular) and the marginal cells are short-rhombic near the apex (not long-linear). The laminal cells of M. arizonicum are diagonal out from the costa, then tend to become parallel to the margin along the margin in several rows. The cells are porose, rather thick, especially distally, and are not collenchymatous.

 

Brit. Colo. Wyoming; Ariz, Nev., Utah, Colo. Wyoming, Flowers 1973. Wyoming: Teton Co.: Cascade Canyon, 1953, Conard (CANM), Koponen (1972). Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO., F. J. Hermann 17114, 8000 ft. (RM); 10,800 ft., Holmes Rolston 86085 (Colo. State Herb.); P.M.Eckel 120886 (BUF, RM), 8000 ft. PARK CO.: thin soil over dry, shaded rock under open canopy of Douglas-fir, at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft. J. C. Elliott 1784 (BUF), Aug. 12, 1990; 8300 feet, 13110 (RM, BUF); PARK CO., T 54 N, R 105 W, Sec. 13 N no 13151; 8000.’ SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/2 mile southwest of Barnes Lake, 9760 ft. elev., 42°57'N, 109°36'W. Terrace fen. On N facing rock at edge of fen. Richard Andrus 7826 (BING).

 

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Mnium bimum Schreber = Ptychostomum bimum (Schreber) J. R. Spence

 

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Mnium blyttii Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 4: 208, plate 400. 1846  (Mniaceae)

 

Astrophyllum blyttii (B.S.G.) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Alaska, Yuk., Northw. Terr, Utah, Col; Greenland. Togwotee Pass, Fremont Co. (Frye, in 1931), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8,500 ft., R. Lichvar 1341 (RM); Hermann 17699 (RM) 10,000 ft.. FREMONT CO.: 8400 ft., F.J. Hermann 25512 (RM). SHERIDAN CO.: 6600-8000 ft., Odasz 1127 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: 7950ft., F.J. Hermann 25329 (RM).

 

After working on about six specimens of this taxon from one locality in Sheridan Co. (McKee series), one might say that, after Mnium arizonicum with its porose cell walls, the taxon this one might be most easily confused with is Mnium thomsonii. The latter has elongate leaves, vs. the short, broad at the middle leaves of M. blyttii. The latter also has consistent sharp, clear double teeth on the margins, whereas byttii's are variable, generally blunter. Variation is conspicuous in blyttii, its leaf cells sometimes as small as those of M. thomsonii, sometimes as large as in the descriptions, and blyttii does have rounded corners, slightly, not angular (for M. thomsonii, Crum & Anderson say “more or less thickened at the corners Vol.1, p. 587”). In M. blyttii the margins are variously single layered to many: nearly three. My impression of M. thomsonii is that it is more stable in its characteristics. The leaf shape seems to be the best character to differentiate them [M. blyttii is broadest at the middle, also densely rhizoidal, whereas thomsonii is scarcely so - Lawton]. Also M. thomsonii seems to have some teeth at the back of the costa, which was hard to demonstrate in any of the McKee specimens. [Richard used KOH, as in Koponen, but found no bluing in M. blyttii specimens to help differentiate]. Use the complexity of the leaf margin to separate from M. marginatum (q.v.) in sterile specimens. “Doubtful specimens are easily distinguished by the following chemical test: heat a leaf with alcohol to destroy the chlorophyll, then add a drop of KOH. The leaf should turn blue-green.” Weber p. 24

 

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Mnium hornum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 188. 1801     (Mniaceae)  unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014) This mostly eastern species does occur in Colorado, though rare: a “Pleistocene relict species of the eastern American woodlands” (Weber and Whittmann, 2007, Bryophytes of Colorado, Pilgrims Process, Inc.

 

Brooklyn Lake, Albany Co. (Elias Nelson, 5171), Porter, 1935. [In Grout, Vol. 2 part 4 p. 247 this species is described from the Atlantic coastal region. “Collected once in Missouri, at Clayton by P. K. Lawrence in 1904.”]

 

“Mnium hornum is one of the most distinctive members of the genus.  The  long, narrow leaves and strongly toothed abaxial costae are diagnostic for the species, as is the presence of small, narrowly triangular, mostly smooth-margined leaves on the proximal portions of the stem” (McIntosh & Newmaster, FNA Vol.28, 2014).

 

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Mnium lycopodioides Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 2(2,1): 24, plate 160 [bottom]. 1826  (Mniaceae)

 

Mnium ambiguum H. Müller

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Mnium lycopodioides Schwaegr. Excluded from N. Am. flora “American specimens are mostly M. ambiguum H. Muell.” in 1990 checklist.”

 

(Synonymy of Mnium ambiguum from earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Mnium lycopodioides var. inclinatum (Lindb.) Wijk & Marg.

Mnium pseudolycopodioides C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Mnium umbratile Mitt.

 

(As Mnium ambiguum) Brit. Colo. Wash, Oregon, Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Col; Ontario, New Eng., New York.

 

(As Mnium ambiguum) ALBANY CO.; 8590 ft., F.J. Hermann 24878 (RM); 10,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 17703 (RM).

 

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Mnium marginatum (Dickson ex Withering) P. Beauvois, Prodr. Aethéogam., 75. 1805

Bryum marginatum Dickson ex Withering, Syst. Arr. Brit. Pl. ed. 4, 3: 824. 1801      (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Mnium serratum Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Alberta, Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Calif., Ariz., Col; South Dak., Iowa, Missouri, Ark., Ontar; Quebec, New Engl., N. Carolina.

 

(As Mnium serratum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1522) (Roell 1893).

(As Mnium serratum Schrad.) Albany Co., “from several locations,” Porter, 1935. (As Mnium subglobosum B. & S.) Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1744 & 2702), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: in deep shade on wet, peaty, wooded bank of Nash Fork on Sand Lake Rd., 2 miles NW of Rte. 130, alt. 8500 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., ca. 4 miles 2 of Centennial, Hermann 17778, Aug. 5, 1962 (RM) (sterile specimen seen, with complex marginal cell bundle); La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5176 (RM), c.fr. Aug. 25, 1898, with Leucobryum pyriforme, Bryum turbinatum, Distichium capillaceum. PARK CO., T55N, R104W Sec. 25, 26, 6800-7400 ft., Hartman no 22062 (RM) . SUBLETTE CO: wet, peaty knoll under spruce on west shore of Lower Green River Lake, alt. 7950ft., Wind River Range, 50 miles N of Pinedale, Jermann 25330 (RM), June 19, 1973. TETON CO.: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris c.fr., July 6, 1985, w. Brachythecium salebrosum, Distichium capillaceum, Aulacomnium palustre, Cratoneuron filicinum, Eckel 94082106 (BUF)

 

Distinctive are the double teeth (Mnium), synoicous inflorescences (good distinction from M. blytii) and thickened cell corners. Note, especially in sterile specimens, that the teeth are sometimes very low and blunt and the doubleness is not demonstrable (as noted by Flowers). How to tell it from M. blyttii is by the complexity of the marginal cell bundle (cf. Lawton's key): if only two or three cells the plant might be M. blyttii. If four or more, it is M. marginatum. Otherwise the areolation of both species are the same as described. To differentiate from M. lycopodioides, as in Lawton's key - I presume that species has well defined teeth.

 

Mnium orthorhynchium sensu auct. plur. = M. thomsonii Schimp. [1990 checklist: another use of M. orthorhynchium Brid. is for Atrichum tenellum (Roel.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. which has not been reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).]

 

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Mnium spinulosum Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 4: 206, plate 394. 1846   . (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Not noted for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Battle Creek Canyon, Carbon County (Porter, 1720), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

Mnium spinulosum is distinguished by broad, thick, and pigmented leaf margins, usually obovate leaves, and dark red-brown exostomes” (McIntosh & Newmaster, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). 

 

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Mnium thomsonii Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur. ed. 2, 485. 1876 (as thomsoni)   (Mniaceae)

 

Mnium orthorhynchum Bridel (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(Synonymy from the earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Mnium decurrens C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Mnium inclinatum Lindb.

 

Wyoming; “the small laminal cells, the smallest in the genus, are diagnostic”(McIntosh & Newmaster, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Oregon, Alberta, Mont., Wyoming; Colo., Minnesota, Ont., Iowa, Ark.; Greenland, Quebec, Nova Scot, N. Carol.

 

(As Mnium orthorhynchum) Albany, Sublette cos., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: soil on wet rocky edge of stream in aspens, alt. 8590 ft., NW slope of Pole Mt., Poly creek Campground, Medicine Bow N.F., 9 mi SE of Laramie, Centennial, Hermann 24868, June 7, 1972 (RM); Medicine Bow Mts. Libby Creek, growing along rotten log on moist soil. Common [in packet of Brachythecium erythrorrhizon] Lichvar 1347b (RM). PARK CO.; 6500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20036 (RM). PARK CO.; 7500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20056 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake, with Bartramia ithyphylla Richard Andrus 7787a (BING).

 

The Albany Co. specimen of Hermann's (24868) had non varying double teeth, smaller leaf cells, long thin leaves, thick walls with minor corner thickenings and dioicous. The specimen was det. by T. Koponen as M. marginatum, but perhaps in distribution duplicate specimens got mixed. [(= Mnium thomsonii Schimp. = Mnium orthorrhynchum auct. plur. in 1990 checklist.

 

(Synonymy of Mnium orthorrhynchum in the earlierWyoming checklist:)

Astrophyllum orthorrhynchum (Brid.) Lindb.

Mnium decurrens C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Mnium inclinatum Lindb.

Mnium lycopodioides ssp. orthorrhynchum (Lindb.) Wijk & Marg.

 

In Crum & Anderson as Mnium thomsonii Schimp. p. 587: Mnium orthorhynchium sensu auct. plur. non Brid. 1817.] Albany County (Porter, 692); Sublette County (Porter, 1123).

 

“Both of these specimens are sterile. 692 was determined by Dr. Grout as being almost certainly this species,” Porter, 1935.

 

(As Mnium orthorrhynchum) ALBANY CO.: 10,000 ft., F. J. Hermann 17728 (RM).

 

Mnium orthorhynchum Bridel = Mnium thomsonii Schimper.

 

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MYURELLA Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 39, plate 560. 1853  (Pterigynandraceae)

 

Myurella julacea (Schwägrichen) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 41. 1853

Leskea julacea Schwägrichen in J. A. Schultes, Reise Glockner 2: 363. 1804     (Pterigynandraceae)

 

Wyoming; “Plants of Myurella julacea are distinguished by their small, wormlike habit and yellow-green color” (Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

ALBANY CO.; F.J. Hermann 17222 1/2 (RM): fragmentary but distinctive material.

 

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NECKERA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 200, plate 46, figs. 10–15; plates 47, 48. 1801, name conserved . (Neckeraceae) ·

Neckera pennata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 200. 1801  (Neckeraceae) unillo

 

Neckera oligocarpa Bruch (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

Neckera pennata var. oligocarpa (Bruch in Aongstr.) C. Muell.

Neckera pennata var. tenera C. Muell.

 

Not noted for Wyoming, but within the range of the species (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Lawton, 1971, indicated a specimen from Wyoming. (As var. oligocarpa B. & S.) Hawk's Ranch, Colorado-Wyoming State line, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 11,297), Porter, 1935. (As var. oligocarpa (Bruch) Grout), Albany Co., Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO., C. L. Porter #1754 (RM).

 

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NIPHOTRICHUM (Bednarek-Ochyra) Bednarek-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.,

Cens. Cat. Polish Mosses, 137. 2003  (Grimmiaceae)

Racomitrium subg. Niphotrichum Bednarek-Ochyra, Fragm. Florist. Geobot., Ser. Polon. 2: 70.

1995

 

Niphotrichum canescens   (Hedwig) Bednarek-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al., Cens. Cat. Polish Mosses, 137. 2003

Trichostomum canescens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 111. 1801    (Grimmiaceae)

 

Bryum canescens (Hedw.) Wither.

Trichostomum canescens Hedw.

Grimmia canescens (Hedw.) Muller Hal.

Racomitrium canescens (Hedw.) Brid.

Trichostomum canescens Hedw. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Synonymy for Racomitrium canescens (Hedw.) Brid. in previous list:

Racomitrium canescens fo. ericoides (Hedw.) Moenk. See discussion of this entity in Crum & Anderson p. 446). (fo. ericoides).

Racomitrium ericoides (Hedw.) Brid.

Trichostomum ericoides Hedw.

 

Only the subsp. canescens is reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Racomitrium canescens) in all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Cal., Colo.; Michigan, Ontario; Greenland, New England. (As Rhacomitrium canescens) Sundance, Crook County (Aven Nelson, 9704); Leigh Lake, Teton County (Porter, 1192); around hot springs, Nez Perces Creek, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 6210), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(All as Racomitrium canescens) PARK CO., 2900 msm, W. A. Weber, B-44286 (RM, COLO). SUBLETTE CO.: (conforms to Lawton's var. ericoides) as ssp. canescens (Frisvoll), 11,200 ft., Holmes Rolston III (CS). TETON CO.: gravelly soil, dry stream bed, entrance to Leigh Lake, 7,000 ft., Aug. 2, 1932, C. L. Porter 1192 (WTU); Teton Natl. Park, Cascade Trail, Aug. 14, 1953, E. Lawton, 1764 (WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Aven & Elias Nelson 6210 (RM); In woods near Old Faithful geyser, Frye, Aug. 15, 1925 (WTU); near Roaring Mountain, Aug. 16, 1925, T. C. Frye (WTU); one mile north of Thumb, on dry rocky soil, July 7, 1934, T. C. Frye (WTU); Norris Geyser Basin, wet soil, Aug. 14, 1925, T. C. Frye. (WTU); about 5 miles from Canyon Lodge road to Norris, Aug. 29, 1951, E. Lawton 1500 (WTU); on boulder along Firehole River near Old Faithful, July 6, 1934, T. C. Frye (WTU). Frisvoll has determined two specimens from Wyoming as Rhacomitrium elongatum (Ehrh.) ex Frisvoll: YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: about Terrace Hotspring, June 20, 1931, T. C. Frye (WTU); in open dry place, sandy soil at West Thumb, Aug. 1, 1932, D. C. Smiley 126 (WTU).

 

(As Racomitrium canescens) since I have not made a study of American plants of Racomitrium canescens (Timm ex Hedw.) Brid. as to their distinction from R. ericoides (Web) ex Brid.) Brid. or R. elongatum, as per Frisvoll, 1983, I have chosen to follow Lawton (1971) and the conservative concepts of Crum and Anderson (1981), which lump these species under R. canescens (Hedw.) Brid. There is a var. latifolium C. Jens. in the 1990 checklist.

 

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Niphotrichum elongatum (Frisvoll) Bednarek-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al., Cens. Cat. Polish Mosses,  138. 2003

Racomitrium elongatum Frisvoll, Gunneria 41: 74, figs. 1983    (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Racomitrium elongatum Frisvoll..

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Niphotrichum ericoides (Bridel) Bednarek-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al., Cens. Cat. Polish Mosses, 138. 2003

Trichostomum ericoides Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1800(2): 290. 1801 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Bryum ericoides (Brid.) Dicks.

Grimmia canescens (Hedw.) Müller Hal. var. ericoides (Brid.) Müller Hal.

Racomitrium brevipes Kindb. var. ericoides (Brid.) Kindb.

Racomitrium canescens var. ericoides (Brid.) Hampe

Racomitrium ericoides (Brid.) Brid.

Trichostomum canescens Hedw. [unranked] ericoides (Brid.) Hartm.

Trichostomum ericoides Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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ONCOPHORUS (Bridel) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 389. 1826 (Dicranaceae)

Dicranum sect. Oncophorus Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 4: 53. 1819

 

Oncophorus virens (Hedwig) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 399. 1826

Dicranum virens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 142. 1801   (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Cynodontium virens (Hedw.) Schimp.

Dicranum virens Hedw.

Dicranum virens var. serratum B.S.G.

Oncophorus virens var. serratus (B.S.G.) Braithw.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, California, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, New Mexico; Minnesota, Michigan; Greenland, Nova Scotia, Quebec. Fairly common along streams from 9,000-10,000 ft. in southeastern Wyoming; Albany (Porter, 1372), [Carbon, Johnson cos.] Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: peaty vertical bank of streamlet in mountain meadow, 1 1/4 miles S of Brooklyn Lake, 10,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 9 miles W of Centennial, c. fr. Aug. 2, 1962, Hermann 17679 (RM). CARBON CO.: moss-covered, peaty bank of Trail Creek, W of Sand Lake Rd., 9,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 4.5 miles SW of Morgan, c. fr. Aug. 6, 1962, Hermann 17798 (RM). FREMONT CO.: 12,500 ft., wet places near small waterfall, Francis X. Jozwik 471, c.fr. August 6, 1963 (RM). PARK CO.: alpine bog, 3250 msm, W. A. Weber, B-44223 (RM, COLO); Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; alpine bog of east summit, east slope, head of Wyoming Creek, 3250 msm, Weber, B- 44264 (COLO, RM).

 

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Oncophorus wahlenbergii Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 400. 1826

Oncophorus wahlenbergii var. compactus (Bruch & Schimper) Braithwaite      (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

PARK CO: 2900 msm, W. A. Weber c. fr. Aug. 19, 1973, B-44288 (RM, COLO). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake with Campylium stellatum, Climacium americanum & Distichium capillaceum, Richard Andrus 7784a (BING). The Andrus specimen had a single stem with many flagellate branches with minute distant leaves in the apex! The costa has a tendency to come off the stem in a long strip in this species with decurrent leaves - both characters like Bryum pseudotriquetrum.

 

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ORTHOTRICHACEAE.

  The peristomes may be examined by selecting an old, well-developed capsule with the operculum still attached (capsules with the distinctively hairy calyptra are usually too young to yield characteristics for the species). The operculum can be removed by dripping a drip of KOH on it: the tissues swell and the operculum detaches leaving the peristome unaltered by dissection.

  The preperistome, or prostome, is on the front of the exostome (the endostome is behind it). The appearance of this character was described by Flowers (1973) for O. cupulatum: “preperistome often present, usually imperfect or irregular and fragmentary, sometimes pale and obscure but often appearing as darker blotches on the lower joints and plates of the teeth, sometimes much thickened and striate like the teeth.”

 

Note that goniautoicous indicates an autoicous or monoicous inflorescence with the male inflorescence small, gemmiform, and axillary on the same stem or branch as the female inflorescence.

 

Stomata immersed = cryptoporous. Stomata superficial = phaneroporous.

 

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ORTHOTRICHUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 162. 1801  (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Orthotrichum affine Schrader ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 22. 1801  (Orthotrichaceae) unillo

 

Not reported yet for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Albany County (Porter, 1004), [Washakie Co.], Porter, 1935.

 

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Orthotrichum alpestre Hornschuch ex Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 75, plate 213. 1849 (Orthotrichaceae) unillo

 

Orthotrichum alpestre var. majus Lesquereux & James

Orthotrichum alpestre var. watsonii (James) Grout

Orthotrichum occidentale James

Orthotrichum watsonii James (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany Co. (Porter, 1288), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: exposed crevices in granite boulder on grassland, Laramie Mts., Horse Creek drainage, 8000ft., 10 miles ENE of Laramie, Hermann 17112 (RM) Aug. 17, 1961; Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 8 air miles NE of Laramie city center; 7850-8000 ft, thin soil over limestone boulder, N. G. Miller 10,240 (NYS) June 7, 1993, c.fr. BIGHORN CO.: UTM 13 316537 E 4900238 N, on rock in forest; on forested, rocky north slope of weathered limestone, with Picea engelmannii; near Soldier Cr. Cow Camp; approx. 4.5 air mil WSW of West Tensleep Lake; Bighorn National Forest, elev. 8285 ft. (2526 m.) Aug. 28, 2005, M. J. Lenz no 2261 (MO). JOHNSON CO. UTM 13 342387 E 4902965 N, on rock under overhand; large rock outcrop with Populus tremuloides on N side and Pinus contorta around S side; approx. 6.6 air mi. E of Bighorn Peak; Bighorn National Forest, 8180 ft (2494 M), Aug. 29, 2005 M. J. Lenz no. 2367 (RM). PARK CO.: 7500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20062 (RM). FREMONT CO.: rock outcrop along stream, Fiddler's Lake Rd (Wyo. 131), 8600 ft, 14 miles SSW of Lander, Hermann 25310 (RM) June 18, 1973. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: 5500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20014 (RM).

 

A specimen of this species was noted to have a bright blue-green or verdigris-like color of the stems, and the bright red-brown tomentum, as  mentioned by Crum and Anderson (1981) citing Hinneri (Ann. Univ. Turku A, II, 58:1-37, 1976), who reported a “bluish color of the tufts and a rich, red-brown tomentum.” The loose leaves when dry and bright color are suggestive of other mosses, such as Hymenostylium recurvirostrum.

 

The capsule cell-walls are thin in the furrows and thicker in the ribs. Basal cells thin-walled and even, as is typical of Orthotrichum species with immersed capsules. In section, the cross-walls are thin, the outer surface thick, with tall simple or widely- forked papillae. The emergent capsules are strongly 8-ribbed and strangulate or constricted when dry. Peristome teeth are 8, together with 16 robust endostome teeth that may be erect, wide-spreading or typically strongly deflexed and lying along the capsule mouth. In the latter case, the distinctive endostome segments appear as erect filaments. Axillary perigonia occur in the leaf axils below the perichaetia (not at the ends of separate branches , as in O. pallens, which also has 16 endostome segments and a naked calyptra). The rather sparsely hairy calyptra hairs are papillose.

 

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Orthotrichum anomalum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 162. 1801 (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Orthotrichum anomalum var. americanum Macoun & Kindberg

Orthotrichum canadense Bruch & Schimper

Orthotrichum consimile subsp. anomaloides Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming; “The most useful character in distinguishing plants of this species is the exserted capsule with eight long ribs alternating with eight shorter ones” (Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany Co. (Porter, 756), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: On granite rocks, Hawk's Ranch, C. L. Porter, 756, April 26, 1931, c.fr. (NY). WESTON CO.: Newcastle, on arid rock in dryish canyon, Leroy Peiler, 17,030, July 16, 1942 (NY).

 

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Orthotrichum cupulatum Hoffmann ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 25. 1801  (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Orthotrichum leiodon Kindberg

Orthotrichum utahense Lesquereux

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Apparently our commonest species. Albany, Teton cos., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985, citing Porter. Albany Co., Telephone Canyon, Porter 606, 685, 1270 (TENN), Vitt (1973).

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mts., Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, 2400 msm, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck, 23151 (NY), capsules with calyptrae June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: 9300 ft., F.J. Hermann 25300 (RM). SHERIDAN CO. T 56N, R 87W S14 Big Horn Mts.; ca 4 air miles SSW of Dayton. Forested valley trhough Chugwater redbeds and limestone outcrops, and forest margin, 4800 Ft. Aug. 3, 1979, R. L. Hartman no. 10648 (RM).

 

The leaf lamina has an occasional bistratose patch or streak especially in the apical part. This feature is not rare, but is not evident in many cross sections even on the same leaf - certainly not as evidently bistratose as O. pellucidum, which was once considered to be a variety of this species. The 16 ribs in the dry capsule are conspicuous and the capsules are more immersed than emergent - in O. pellucidum the capsules are emergent to shortly exserted - in some collections most of the stems have shortly exserted capsules (a bit of the seta can be seen below the base of the capsule).

 

The leaf lamina is continuously bistratose throughout in O. hallii.

 

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Orthotrichum jamesianum Sull. in James. in Watson = Orthotrichum pellucidum Lindberg

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: OrthOrthotrichumCupulatum_Art_Web

 

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Orthotrichum hallii Sullivant & Lesquereux in W. S. Sullivant, Icon. Musc., suppl., 63, plate 45. 1874

 (Orthotrichaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany County (Porter, 485 & 638), [Natrona cos.], Porter, 1935. Wyoming, Flowers 1973. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: PM Eckel 871104 (RM, BUF); 8600 ft., on granite rocks, April 7, 1988 Vukelich (BUF); along Roger Canyon in the Laramie Mtns, 7 mi. due NE of Laramie city center, Artemesia scrub vegetation; limestone cliffs and outcrops, 7,600 ft. Vertical seeping crack in limestone cliff, W. D. Reese 18158 (LAF) June 7, 1993 with Grimmia anodon. FREMONT CO.; 9300 ft., F.J. Hermann 25298 (RM). PARK CO. T55N R104W, sec 5,6,7  5600-6000 feet; R. Hartman no 20603 a & b, with O. rupestre and O. laevigatum.

 

The lamina are essentially completely or continuously 2 (-3)-stratose, whereas in O. cupulatum it is only interruptedly bistratose in streaks, or, in O. pellucidum, the streaks are broader but never continuous.

 

The stomata of the capsule are immersed, the basal cells thin and even-walled. The capsules are emersed with only 8 (not 16) ribs. The most distinctive feature of this moss is the essentially completely bistratose laminae in the distal leaf and the papillae that are low and obscure (not high and forked). The peristome teeth may be striate with ridges or with small, conic papillae. They may be proximally coarsely papillose and distally with striae and papillae mixed (after Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Orthotrichum alpestre, O. pallens and O. pumilum are all unistratose, the last two with stems less than 0.5 mm long (O. hallii is 1-1.5 cm high).

 

Weber and Whittmann mention that this species, in Colorado, grows with O. rupestre and O. laevigatum “at lower altitudes” and mention it is “Probably the most common species on rocks in the outer foothills.”

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Orthotrichum holzingeri Renault & Cardot, Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 3: 270. 1895  (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

“Fremont Co.: Shoshone National Forest, Wind River Mountains, along Hwy 131, SW of Lander, between Sinks Canyon St. Pk. and Frye Lake, 10.0 km NE of Frye Lake, 2,200 m, Vitt 35377 (ALTA, C, CANM, COLO, MO, NY,, PMA, UBC); Popo Agie Falls, 2,320 m, Vitt 35420 (ALTA, C, CANM, COLO, MO, NY, PMA, UBC),” Vitt 1991.

 

FREMONT CO.: Vitt no. 35378 as cited above (MO) "On vertical ledges of calcareous rock in seasonally wet stream and on dry outcrops near stream in Pseudotsuga menziesii-Pinus contorta-Pinus flexilis forest." Dale H. Vitt with Ross Hastings June 5, 1990." PARK CO.: 6500 ft. granite, “new to Wyoming,” F.J. Hermann 20029 (RM).

 

Cited by Vitt (1973) and also: Vitt, D. H. 1991. Rediscovery of Orthotrichum holzingeri: its Morphology and Habitat in Western North America. Bryologist 94(1): 77-79. “The species occurs in a unique habitat of periodically inundated rock surfaces near streams in dry, montane forests.” Found on “vertical calcareous rock surfaces and at the bases of Salix bushes just above rock substrates. On these substrates it occurs in areas subject to periodic inundation by seasonally high water. In the Wind River Mountains it was collected in a dry stream bed about 2-3 m wide, and at the edge of a much larger, permanent stream, where it was wet due to spray from swiftly running water. In both instances Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp. occurred in association. The two collections were made in montane forests dominated by Pseudotsuga menziesii, Pinus contorta, and Pinus flexilis.”

 

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Orthotrichum laevigatum J. E. Zetterstedt, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 19: 363. 1862

 (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Orthotrichum hainesiae Austin

Orthotrichum kingianum Lesquereux

Orthotrichum laevigatum var. kingianum (Lesquereux) Grout

Orthotrichum lonchothecium Macoun & Kindberg

Orthotrichum macounii Austin

Orthotrichum macounii var. lonchothecium (Macoun & Kindberg) Grout

Orthotrichum raui Austin

Orthotrichum  roellii Venturi

Orthotrichum roellii subsp. schlotthaueri (Venturi) Kindberg

Orthotrichum roellii subsp. stenocarpum (Venturi) Kindberg

Orthotrichum schlotthaueri Venturi

Orthotrichum speciosum var. brevicaule Lesquereux

Orthotrichum speciosum var. hainesiae (Austin) Paris

Orthotrichum speciosum subsp. laevigatum (J. E. Zetterstedt) J.J. Amann

Orthotrichum speciosum var. polyanthum Lesquereux

Orthotrichum speciosum var. polycarpum Lesquereux & James

Orthotrichum speciosum var. raui (Austin) Lesquereux & James (all from FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(Synonymy from earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Orthotrichum laevigatum fo. macounii (Aust.) Lawt. & Vitt in Lawt.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As O. macounii) Wyoming, Flowers 1973. (As Orthotrichum macounii Aust.) Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. (As var. lonchothecium (C. Muell. & Kindb.) Grout.) Washakie Co., Porter, 1937. Am1 Wyoming, Flowers 1973. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

BIG HORN CO.: Middle Ten Sleep Creek, north side of a great rock, Aug. 1, 1901, Leslie N. Goodding no. 479 (MO); UTM 13 326560 E 4898333 N, on rock; subalpine lake margin & surrounding forest of Pinus contorta & Abies lasiocarpa, with Vaccinium scoparium; SE shore of East Tensleep Lake; Bighorn Natnl. Forest 9734 ft (2968 m), Aug. 25, 2005 M. H. Lenz no. 2148 (MO).  CAMPBELL CO. Richelle Hils, head of Wildcat and S Fork Keyton Creeks, T 41 N, R 69 W, Sec. 11, 12, 1500-1550 m; natural brick and sandstone of Fort Union formation, Pinus ponderosa-Juniperus-sagebrush associations; N-facing cliffs, 5-8 June, 1975 W. A. Weber B-49248, Powder River Basin Coal Strip Mine Ecological Impact Inventory (MO).  FREMONT CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest on US26 & US287, between Moran & Dubois ca. 9000' Alpine meadow, much herbage. Wet with flowing streams. Granite outcrops. N slopes of knoll, with Tortula ruralis, Eckel 9308102 (BUF); (as f. macounii) 9300 ft., F.J. Hermann 25299 (RM). JOHNSON CO., PM Eckel 24586; T52N, R 84 Sec. 25  5600-6000 ft.,. Odasz, coll. no. 1264 (RM). LINCOLN CO.; 6700 ft., F.J. Hermann 25601 (RM). PARK CO.; 6500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20032 1/2 (RM); Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Hwy; granitic ridges with Picea and Pinus flexilis, vicinity of Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm, on rock outcrops, Weber B-44240 (RM, COLO) Aug. 20, 1973; 7500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20054 (RM); dry, shaded rock under open canopy of Douglas-fir, at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1795 (MO) Aug. 12, 1990;  T55N R104W, sec 5,6,7  5600-6000 feet; R. Hartman no 20603 a & b, with O. hallii and O. rupestre. SHERIDAN CO.; 5400-6000 ft., Hartman 9402 (RM, BUF); T 56 N, R 90 W, Sec. 31& 32, 8800-8700 ft., Big Horn Mountains, Odasz no .866; Big Horn Mts., T57N R 87W S29; Freezeout Stock Trail; Sec. 29 & 30; east exposure on limestone and chugwater redbeds; mostly open with a few groves of Pinus ponderosa; 5400-6800 ft; 5400 ft.  Aug. 7, 1979; R. L. Hartman no. 10814 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: 10,300 ft., H.Rolston, 86024 (Colo St.U.); (as f. macounii) 7950 ft., F.J. Hermann 25322 (RM). TETON CO.; (as f. macounii) 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25551 (RM); Teton National Park, between Jenny Lake and Lake Solitude, granite, vertical; 7000-7800 ft Aug. 14, 1953, W. H. Welch no. 16239 (MO). YELLOWSTONE NATNL PARK: on the vertical face of a great shaded rock, Druid Peak, A. & E. Nelson 5791 (RM) July 12, 1899, capsules dehisced & old, exsiccat Plants of Yell. Nat. Pk. det. Holzinger; on rock at Lower Falls - Yellowstone Falls, Floyd Bartley & Leslie Pontious 8 (RM) Aug. 21, 1938; west of Bear Tooth Butte, along Clark Fork of Yellowstone River, 6940 ft. Aug. 22, 1953, Elva Lawton no. 1997 (MO).

 

Rather a distinctive Orthotrichum, with its thick-walled nodose basal cells, recurved margins, long-exserted unribbed capsules. In the Fremont specimen the cells of the leaf insertion were in a red row, clear under the dissecting scope. On rock (not trees, usually). Teeth are erect with grainy-papillose surface markings (not smooth).

 

The epithet refers to a capsule that is not ribbed when dry, as is usual in the genus, but essentially smooth.

 

The character most emphasized to separate this species from O. rupestre is the length of the seta: for O. laevigatum, the capsule is plainly exserted, the seta 2-5 mm long usually longer than the exserted capsule. The stems are relatively shorter (1-4 cm long ).

 

The capsules are smooth or slightly plicate distally; exothecial cells homogeneous, rarely slightly ribbed just below the mouth [L.]  Exothecial cells not much differentiated among the ribs. The calyptrae can be more copiously pilose than as illustrated here.

 

In O. rupestre the capsule is  immersed to emergent, the seta is usually less than 2 mm long [0.8-1.2 mm: less than the length of the capsule],  the stems are quite a bit larger (3-8 mm long), the seta usually  less than 1 mm long . Note that O. rupestre is very variable, sometimes the capsule length is hard to see because the neck and the tip of the seta cannot be distinguished. [characters after Lawton 1971]. The capsule is slightly or distinctly 8-ribbed 1/2--2/3 the length and ranges from nearly smooth to distinctly ribbed throughout, or ribbed only in the upper part when dry [L]; the exothecial  cells are often differentiated among the ribs [L].

 

Both these species often grow with O. hallii, q.v., a species with 2(-3)-stratose leaves.

 

Orthotrichum anomalum also has exserted sometimes smooth capsules, but its stomata are immersed and the basal leaf cells are rectangular and not nodulose.

 

Orthotrichum pylaisii is very similar to O. laevigatum: see discussion under the former species. The erect peristome teeth of O. laevigatum will separate this species from the strongly reflexed teeth of O. pylaisii. The long-decurrent, often excavate nature of the alar cells of both these species, and the red to orange coloration at the insertion occurs in both these species.

 

A specimen of Orthotrichum laevigatum from Sheridan Co. (Odasz no. 1133 Big Horn Mtns.) was strikingly similar to the description of O. macounii Aust. as described and figured by Flowers (1973): rather than the bluntly acute or obtuse leaf apex typical of O. laevigatum, the apices of all the cauline leaves were long acuminate to a slender, hair-like tip. The capsules were long and very smooth, the plants strongly yellow. Orthotrichum macounii intergrades with O. laevigatum so extensively that the former is synonymized with the latter.

 

 

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: OrthOrthotrichumLaevigatum_Art_Web

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Orthotrichum obtusifolium Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 23. 1801    (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Nyholmiella obtusifolia (Bridel) Holmen & E. Warncke

Orthotrichum inflexum Müller Hal.

 

Wyoming; “Orthotrichum obtusifolium is a pronounced xerophyte growing only in pioneer situations” (Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

CROOK CO.: Black Hills: 6.4 km N-NE of Warrens Peaks, along Beaver Creek; deciduous woods along creek, moss shaded trunk of Acer negundo. Churchill 8739, May 21, 1977 (MO).

 

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[[Orthotrichum pallens Bruch ex Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 788. 1827  s.l.

 

Orthotrichum immersum Bridel

Orthotrichum pallens var. immersum (Bridel) Müller Hal.

 

This species, or its three varieties, are not reported for Wyoming, although to be looked for (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1420) (Roell 1893).]

 

[ Orthotrichum pallens Bruch ex Bridel var. parvum Vent.

 

A var. parvum is not noted among the synonymy and three recognized varieties by Vitt (FNA Vol. 28, 2014), although the species, sensu lato, may be expected in Wyoming.

 

Wyoming, “Yellowstone National Park,” Flowers 1973. Excluded in 1990 checklist.] ]

 

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Orthotrichum pellucidum Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 23: 549. 1867 (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Orthotrichum cupulatum var. jamesianum (James) E. Lawton

Orthotrichum jamesianum James (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Orthotrichum cupulatum var. jamesianum (Sull.) comb. nov. (Lawton). Teton National Forest, Snake River, Red Canyon, Ellison 943-3 (UT) (Vitt, 1973). Teton Nat. For., Snake Riv., Red Canyon, Ellison 943-3 (UT) (Vitt, 1973). ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mtns., Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, 2400 msm, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck 23165 (NY), capsules old, some with calyptrae June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: 7800 ft., F.J. Hermann 25532 (RM); Shoshone national forest in Wind River Mns. Along Hwy 131 SW of Lander, between Sink State Park and Frye Lake 8.4 km NE of Frye Lake, 2260 m “On large, pitted, dry limestone boulders in Pinus contorta-P. flexilis-Pseudotsuga menziesii forest, June 5, 1990  D. H. Vitt & R. Hastings no. 35381 (MO). PARK CO., T55N, R 104 W Sec. 7, N, 6800-7000 ft., R. Hartman no. 12594; T 55 N, R 106 W, Sec. 14,15,22,23,26,27 6900-7800 ft. Hartman no. 21047. SHERIDAN CO.: Moist limestone, vertical rock face, calcareous region, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W Section 27, McKee 92-017, c.fr. calyptrate, immature capsules, June 16, 1992 (BUF, RM).

 

Note that in the Sheridan Co. specimens there were occasionally 16-ribbed capsules (alternate ribs less conspicuous than the main ones and often appearing to be 8-ribbed). These capsules were correspondingly larger. The leafy stems are somewhat glaucous in appearance, the leaves rather broad throughout and oblong-lanceolate to ligulate with broad apices often incurved when dry like a little fist. The stomata are immersed and the cells of the capsule are thick-walled and colored on the ridges, thinner and nearly hyaline in the furrows. Shorter stems are so densely foliose as to appear rosulate. The papillae are large, bi-fid ones mixed with large single ones.

 

Note that the lamina is not supposed to be bistratose in streaks in this species as described for O. cupulatum.

 

Orthotrichum pellucidum grows on rocks (calcareous) and the stems are short (to 1 cm or shorter. O. pallens and O. pumilum are “less than 0.5 cm long” (Lawton) and grow on bark. One handy difference is that the calyptra of O. pellucidum is rather conspicuously hairy, whereas that of O. pallens is not hairy and of O. pumilum is not or sparsely hairy (Weber and Whittmann 2007).

 

Both Orthotrichum cupulatum and O. alpestre are taller plants (usually 1 cm, sometimes to 2.5 cm for the former, and the same for the latter. O. cupulatum generally has bistratose streaks in the lamina and lower papillae, its capsules with 8 prominent ribs and also 8 less prominent ones. O. alpestre is distinguished by tall, rather delicate, stalked papillae, many bifid, the stomata are in the lower (not middle) regions of the capsule and is strongly 8-ribbed.  O. pellucidum has rather coarse papillae intermediate between the two species.

 

The glaucous character of O. pellucidum is not often distinct (the leaves can have a pruinose look, like the surface of a grape) and its thickness appears to be due to the coarseness of the pappillae on the laminae.

 

Orthotrichum strangulatum P. Beauv. has been reported from states west of the central states, but apparently without merit (Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). It is distinctive in the margins (not the lamina) of the leaf multistratose (2-8 layers).

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: OrthotrichaceaeOrthotrichumPellucidum_Web

 

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Orthotrichum praemorsum Venturi, Bot. Centralbl. 44: 418. 1890  (Orthotrichaceae) unillo

 

Orthotrichum affine ssp. praemorsum (Vent. in Roell) Kindb.

Orthotrichum arcticum var. praemorsum (Vent. in Roell) Wijk & Marg.

Orthotrichum idahense Card. & Thér.

Orthotrichum microblephare var. praemorsum (Vent. in Roell) Grout

 

Wyoming; “Orthotrichum praemorsum is rare, known only from a few collections” also from California, Nevada and Washington (Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Lawton notes Idaho, Wyoming and Nevada (1971).

 

Patria. Rocky Mountains: ad rupes Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming 1491) (Roell 1893).  “Orthotrichum praemorsum Vent. on rocks in Yellowstone Natnl. Park, Wyom.” (Roell 1893). “The type collection of this species was taken from Yellowstone National Park by Roell in about 1890. No other collection is known,” Porter, 1935. Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. ( = O. arcticum var. praemorsum (Vent.) Wijk. & Marg. Am1. in Index Musc.).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Yellowstone Falls, 7500 ft., P. A. Rydberg & Ernst A. Bessey, August 14, 1897, c. fr., old young middle (NY).

 

Vitt (1973) mentioned specimens: Yellowstone National Park, near Cascades, Firehole River, Flowers 3849 (UT, WTU). Vitt indicated this was endemic to the western U.S., “Probably restricted to the higher elevations in Pine forests.” It grows on rock in dry areas, whereas O. affine, close to it, grows “on trees in mesophytic areas.”

 

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Orthotrichum pylaisii Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 722. 1826 (as pylaisaei)   (Orthotrichaceae) unillo

 

Orthotrichum arcticum Schimper

Orthotrichum. arcticum subsp. blyttii (Schimper) Kindberg

Orthotrichum. arcticum var. groenlandicum (Berggren) Mönkemeyer

Orthotrichum blyttii Schimper

Orthotrichum blyttii subsp. arcticum (Schimper) Macoun

Orthotrichum blyttii var. arcticum (Schimper) I. Hagen

Orthotrichum blyttii var. groenlandicum (Berggren) C. E. O. Jensen

Orthotrichum blyttii subsp. microblephare (Schimper) Macoun

Orthotrichum blyttii var. microblephare (Schimper) C. E. O. Jensen

Orthotrichum groenlandicum Berggren

Orthotrichum idahoense Cardot & Thériot

Orthotrichum pylaisii subsp. arcticum (Schimper) Kindberg

Orthotrichum pylaisii subsp. groenlandicum (Berggren) Kindberg

Orthotrichum pylaisii subsp. microblephare (Schimper) Kindberg

Orthotrichum rhabdophorum Venturi (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Yellowstone National Park: Rydberg & Bessey no. 1897 (NY) (Vitt 1973).

 

Vitt (l973): listed for Wyoming. Lawton doesn’t mention it; see Vitt p. 77 ff.

 

The capsules are commonly exserted, the top of the seta exposed. Stomata superficial, the basal cells nodose.

 

The leaves of Orthotrichum pylaisii may be red at the insertion, with decurrencies, sometimes quite long, and moderately with excavate cells in the alar region. The basal cells are conspicuously nodose - a character most associated with superficial or phaneropore stomata in the capsules. Stomata in this species are located in a broad region mid-capsule.

 

The 8 exostome teeth are so strongly reflexed as to appear glued to the outer mouth of the capsule where they split (hence becoming 16). The cells of the exothecium (capsule) are differentiated in rows to mid capsule (reflecting the ribbed condition). In O. laevigatum many of the exostome teeth are erect and the exothecial cells are not or little differentiated as the capsule is generally unribbed (smooth). Note, however, that the capsules of O. laevigatum are smooth, but often somewhat ribbed or plicate to strongly furrowed in the same collection.

 

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Orthotrichum rivulare Turner, Muscol. Hibern. Spic., 96, plate 8. 1804    (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Wyoming; “Exposed tree roots, base of trees along streams, siliceous boulders at edges of streams and rivers, frequently inundated rock, aquatic habitats; low to moderate elevations (0--1000 m)”  (Vitt, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

A Lawton 1971 citation.

 

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Orthotrichum rupestre Schleicher ex Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(2): 27, plate 53 [top]. 1816  (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Dorcadion rupestre (Schleicher ex Schwägrichen) Lindberg

Orthotrichum bullatum Müller Hal.

Orthotrichum californicum Venturi

Orthotrichum douglasii Duby

Orthotrichum macfaddenae R. S. Williams

Orthotrichum rupestre var. globosum (Lesquereux) Grout

Orthotrichum rupestre var. macfaddenae (R. S. Williams) Grout

Orthotrichum texanum Sullivant & Lesquereux

Orthotrichum texanum var. globosum Lesquereux (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1486, 1487, 1489) (Roell 1893).

Albany, Carbon Cos., Yellowstone National Park. The var. sturmii (H. & H.) from Big Horn County, (Goodding, 479), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: crevices in vertical face of granite bluff on Sand Lake Rd., 1.3 miles NW of Rte. 130, 8500 ft., 3 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17751 (RM) Aug. 5, 1962; Medicine Bow National Forest, Laramie Range, Blair Picnic Area, N of Interstate 80, Aug. 21, 1987, M. R. Crosby 15348A (MO). BIGHORN CO.: UTM 13 325004 E 4894900 N, on large boulder; lower end of large meadow; along East Tensleep Crk.; approx. 1.7 air mi. NE of Meadowlark Lake; Bighorn National Forest; elev 9018 ft. (2749 m.) Aug. 25, 2005, M. J. Lenz no. 2165 (MO).  FREMONT CO.: Shoshone National Forest in Wind River Mts. Along Hwy 131, SW of Lander, between Sinks Canyon State Park and Frye Lake; 10.0 km NE of Frye Lake; elev. 2200 m.; on vertical ledges of calcareous rock in seasonally wet stream and on dry outcrops near stream in Pseudotsuga menziesii - Pinus contorta - Pinus flexilis forest; June 5, 1990 D. H. Vitt 35376 (MO); Shoshone National Forest in Wind River Mts. Along Hwy 131, SW of Lander, between Sinks Canyon State Park and Frye Lake; just E of Northern Meadows Reservoir (W of Frye Lake); 2650 m elev.; large boulder meadow with stunted Populus tremuloides, June 5, 1990, D. H. Vitt 35390 (MO).   JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn National Forest, Klondike Ranch Quadrant. (54) T49N R83W, Sec. 28, 6,600 ft. August 20, 1992. Rocks in Aspen grove. Katherine Zacharkevics (BING, BUF).   PARK CO.: 6500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20031 (RM);  T55N R104W, sec 5,6,7  5600-6000 feet; R. Hartman no 20603 a & b, with O. hallii and O. laevigatum.  SUBLETTE CO. on granite. Bridger National Forest ca. 6.5 mi. NE of Pinedale. Sept. 13, 1977, B. Allen no. 421 (! D.Vitt). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: just East of Western Jct. of Blacktail Deer loop road; Blacktail Deer Plateau, 2280 m elev, forming extensive mat on north side of 1.5 m high siliceous rock outcrop in open Pseudotsuga menziesii forest. Tortula ruralis and Orthotrichum laevigatum abundant on other rock surfaces. D. H. Vitt 27 Orthotrichaceae Boreali-Americanae Exsiccatae Fasciculus III Nos. 21-30, 1981 [label data misapplied to 30, Macrocoma tenue subsp. sullivantii. J. A. Christie, in sched.]

 

The leaf apex is a stumpy, broad acutation; frequently there is a broad leaf decurrency, and the basal angles are often excavate and thinner walled. The capsule is only emergent and still enclosed among the leaves to the middle of the capsule, the seta hidden in the leaves. Orthotrichum laevigatum and [O. anomalum ] have completely exserted capsules with the seta evident.

 

See discussion under O. laevigatum.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: OrthOrthotrichumRupestre_Art_Web

 

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Orthotrichum speciosum Nees in J. Sturm et al., Deutschl. Fl. 2 (17): 5. 1819 (Orthotrichaceae)

 

Orthotrichum killiasii Müller Hal.

Orthotrichum speciosum subsp. killiasii (Müller Hal.) Kindberg

Orthotrichum speciosum var. killiasii (Müller Hal.) Venturi (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany Co. (Porter, 865), [Yellowstone National Park], Porter, 1935; Yellowstone National Park, Firehole River, Chase no. 175, 1908 (NY) (Vitt 1973).

 

SUBLETTE CO.: 7950 ft., F.J. Hermann 25324 “new to Wyoming” (RM). see discussion in Vitt, 1973, p.51; a circum-boreal species, det. by Vitt as O. laevigatum.]

 

The species is separated from O. laevigatum “by the presence of thick endostome segments, recurved exostome teeth, and lack of a preperistome” (Vitt, 1973). It is “lightly ribbed, exserted capsules with eight recurved exostome teeth and eight stout, thick, endostome segments” (Vitt ,1973).

 

[Orthotrichum urnigerum Myr.

 

This species has been excluded from North America by Anderson et al (1990), nor is it cited in FNA Vol. 28, 2014.

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1884) (Roell 1893).]

 

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PALUDELLA Ehrhardt ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 3: 72. 1817  (Meesiaceae)

 

Paludella squarrosa (Hedwig) Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 3: 72. 1817  (Meesiaceae)

Bryum squarrosum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 186, plate 44, figs. 6–11. 1801

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming in: (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Lawton 1971 citation.

 

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PALUSTRIELLA Ochyra, J. Hattori Bot. Lab. 67: 223, figs. 5, 6. 1989 (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Palustriella commutata (Brid.) Ochyra, in North America = Palustriella falcata (Bridel) Hedenäs, q.v.

 

[Palustriella commutata (Brid.) Ochyra]. EXCLUDED This species appears to be excluded from North America (Hedenäs, FNA Vol. 28, 2014), most specimens of P. commutata are P. falcata (see below).

 

Cratoneuron commutatum (Hedw.) Roth

Cratoneuron commutatum var. falcatum (Brid.) Moenk.

Cratoneuron falcatum (Brid.) G. Roth

 

(As Palustriella commutata) Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Porter, 1457); Union Pass, Fremont County (Aven Nelson, 1078), Porter, 1935. Albany, Fremont cos., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. (As Cratoneuron falcatum (Brid.) Roth.) “Falls of Libby Creek,” Albany County (Porter, 1375), Porter, 1935. (As Cratoneuron falcatum (Brid.) Roth.) Albany Co., Porter, 1937.

 

(As Palustriella commutata) PARK CO.: wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1937 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. PARK CO.: west end of Bear Tooth Lake, E. Lawton, Aug. 20, 1953, 1956, n.fr. (WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: [as Hypnum aduncum Hedw.] In a bog, Obsidian Creek, Aven & Elias Nelson 6106, exsiccat Plants of Yellowstone Natl. Pk. det. Holzinger (the material was typical, numerous paraphyllia, strongly plicate leaves, falcate. leaves ovate-lanceolate, irregularly branching.) SUBLETTE CO.: 8,000 ft. C. L. & Marjorie Porter 9682 (RM); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake. Richard Andrus 7801a (BING). Stems coarse, thick walled inflated basal cells usually left on the stem.

 

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Palustriella decipiens (De Not.) Ochyra, see Palustriella falcata (Bridel) Hedenäs

 

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Palustriella falcata (Bridel) Hedenäs, Bryophyt. Biblioth. 44: 136. 1992   (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum falcatum Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 63, plate 1, fig. 6. 1801

 

(note, the specimens listed above for P. commutata appear to be P. falcata (Hedenäs, FNA Vol. 28, 2014) (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Hypnum falcatum Bridel

Cratoneuron commutatum var. falcatum (Bridel) Mönkemeyer

Cratoneuron commutatum var. sulcatum (Lindberg) Mönkemeyer

Cratoneuron falcatum (Bridel) G. Roth

Cratoneuron  falcatum var. williamsii (Grout) Flowers

Cratoneuron williamsii Grout

 

(Synonymy for Palustriella decipiens in earlier checklist:)

Cratoneuron falcatum var. williamsii (Grout) Flow.

Cratoneuron papillosum Grout

Cratoneuron williamsii Grout

Cratoneuron williamsii Grout. Grout

 

Wyoming; “Palustriella falcata is widespread in the northwest, less common in the northeast, and absent in northern-central and high-Arctic areas.  The species has been misunderstood in North America; most specimens identified as P. commutata (Hedwig) Ochyra [synonym Cratoneuron commutatum (Hedwig) G. Roth], and the few P. decipiens (Notaris) Ochyra records, belong to this species” (Hedenäs, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Palustriella decipiens) ALBANY CO.: F. J. Hermann 10,000 ft. streamlet in mountain meadow, boulder, 17725 (RM). PARK CO.: south slope of Bear Tooth Butte, E. Lawton, Aug. 23, 1953, 2051, c.fr. (WTU). TETON CO.: east of Teton Pass, E. Lawton, Aug. 15, 1953, no 1778, n. fr. (WTU).

 

Basal cells papillose on the back from the upper cell ends.

 

“The species has been misunderstood in North America; most specimens identified as P. commutata (Hedwig) Ochyra [synonym Cratoneuron commutatum (Hedwig) G. Roth], and the few P. decipiens (Notaris) Ochyra records, belong to this species” (Hedenäs in FNA Vol. 28, 2014). 

 

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PARALEUCOBRYUM (Lindberg ex Limpricht) Loeske, Allg. Bot. Z. Syst. 13: 162.

1907   (Dicranaceae)

Dicranum subgen. Paraleucobrym Lindberg ex Limpricht in G. L. Rabenhorst et al., Krypt.-Fl.

ed. 2, 4(1): 373. 1886

 

Paraleucobryum enerve (Thedenius) Loeske, Hedwigia 47: 171. 1908

Dicranum enerve Thedenius in C. J. Hartman, Handb. Skand. Fl. ed. 5, 393. 1849;   (Dicranaceae)

 

Dicranum albicans B.S.G.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Usually in artic or alpine regions. British Columbia, Alberta, Montana: Alaska, Colorado. Park Co., with Pogonatum urnigerum (Kosovich-Anderson 2011b).

 

PARK CO.: alpine bog, 3250 msm, W. A. Weber B-44256 (COLO, RM).

 

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PHILONOTIS Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 15, plate 6, fig. 5. 1827  (Bartramiaceae)

Bartramidula Bruch & Schimper

 

PHILONOTIS

The species in the genus in Wyoming seem to represent one polymorphic species. The names seem to correspond to stages in the lengthening of the stem: early stages are Philonotis fontana var. pumila. A subsequent stage may be var. heterophylla. Philonotis americana var. torquata seems to look like P. fontana var. falcata or intergrade depending on the degree of ranking of the leaves in the mid-section of the stem. In the end one might want to re-borrow the Philonotis specimens from RM to analyze the entire collection again with the aid of illustrations.

 

Philonotis caespitosa Jur. = Philonotis fontana (Hedw.) Brid.

 

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Philonotis fontana (Hedwig) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 18. 1827

Mnium fontanum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 195. 1801        (Bartramiaceae)

 

var. fontana

 

Philonotis caespitosa Jur.

Philonotis fontana var. caespitosa (Jur.) Limpr.

Philonotis fontana var. falcata (Hook.) Brid.

Philonotis fontana var. heterophylla Dismier

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Philonotis fontana) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1495, 1497, 1503) (Roell 1893).   Albany, Carbon, Sheridan, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: La Plata Mines, Aven Nelson 1800 (RM). CARBON CO.: 9500 ft., F. J. Hermann 17179 (RM). SHERIDAN CO.; 8400 ft., B.E.Nelson 4318 (RM, BUF); Dome Lake, July 16, 1896, in packet of Bryum (Rosulabryum) capillare, with Drepanocladus uncinatus, Aven Nelson 8826 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 2. 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake with Climacium americanum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Richard Andrus 7789 (BING).

 

(As var. caespitosa (Jur.) Schimp.) Montana; Minnesota, Ontario; Quebec, New England.

 

(As var. caespitosa (Jur.) Schimp.) ALBANY CO.: steep, wet, peaty bank of inlet, Towner Lake, 10,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 9 miles W of Centennial; Aug. 5, 1962, Hermann 17768 1/2 (RM). PARK CO.: wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1731 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990.

 

(as var. falcata (Hook.) Brid.:)ALBANY CO.: Centennial Valley. Aven Nelson 1756, Aug. 18, 1895, c. fr. (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: on the steep slopes near the river, Lewis River, Nelson 6381 (changed from 6391) (RM)

var. americana (Dismier) Flowers ex H. A. Crum, Bryologist 72: 244. 1969

Philonotis americana Dismier, Mém. Soc. Bot. France 17: 35. 1910        unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Philonotis americana (Dism.) Dism. Var. americana: Lawton.) ALBANY CO.: Sherman & Buford, spring bog, Macbride 2548 (RM). CARBON CO.: Sierra Madre Mtns: along Haggarty Creek, elev. 9680 ft., in wet meadow by creek, c. young fr., teratological (double capsules) July 11, 1991, Nancy Kastning-Culp 3073 (BUF, RM). PARK CO.; pond edge, 7500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20047 (RM) [this specimen corresponds nicely with Elva Lawton's illustrations for Ph. americana var. torquata (Ren. & Geh.) Flow. in Grout: the leaves are distant on the stem.] WASHAKIE CO.: Big Horn Mtns. ca. 33.5 air miles SE of Tensleep, 14.5 miles SSE Big Trails along Cherry Creek, c. fr. operculate, 10 July 1979, 7400 ft., B. E. Nelson 3445 (BUF, RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Aven & Elias Nelson 6062 [Holtzinger] (RM).

 

 var. pumila (Turner) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 20. 1827

Bartramia fontana var. pumila Turner, Muscol. Hibern. Spic., 107, plate 10, fig. 1. 1804     unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn National Forest, Lake Solitude Quadrant. T50N R87W, Sec. 12, 9,600 ft. August 5, 1992. Marshy area just W of Lily Lake + Drepanocladus aduncus var. kneifii. Katherine Zacharkevics (BING, BUF, RM). FREMONT CO.: 8400 ft., Absaroka Range, F. J. Hermann 25506 (RM). LINCOLN CO.: Salt River Range, 6400 ft., F. J. Hermann 25586 (RM). PARK CO.; 3250 msm W.A.Weber B-44262 (COLO, RM). SHERIDAN CO.: Wolf Creek, Nelson 2317, c. fr. July 12, 1896 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: C. L. Porter 1675 (RM).

 

Costa long excurrent, which is the only character I've used. “Pumilus” implies a dwarfed or shortened aspect. These specimens are very robust in general, at least as large as the typical variety. Note Crum & Anderson say they saw a specimen from Wyoming, p. 655.

 

 (As var. heterophylla Dismier) PARK CO.; 10,000 ft., tundra, F.J. Hermann 20074 (RM). Costa subpercurrent. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: (exsiccat) In a springy bog, Obsidian Creek, July 24, 1899, Nelson & Nelson 6110 (RM). Holzinger identified this specimen as var. alpina, apparently without noticing the dimorphous leaves.

 

Leaves dimorphic, the lower ones tyical, the upper ones shorter with margins plane or revolute only at the base; leaf cells short - Lawton, p. 212.

 

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Philonotis marchica (Hedwig) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 23. 1827

Mnium marchicum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 196. 1801             (Bartramiaceae)

 

Philonotis muehlenbergii (Schwägrichen) Bridel

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

[? Philonotis Mohriana (Müll. Hal.) A. Jaeger (basionym Bartramia mohriana Müll. Hal. = Breutelia mohriana (Müll. Hal.) Broth.

 

(As Philonotis muehlenbergii) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1552) (Roell 1893).

As Philonotis mohriana Lesqu. & James: Battle Lake Mountain, Carbon County (Aven Nelson, 4202, in part.) Not in checklist 1990; no reference in FNA Vol. 28, 2014]

 

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Philonotis yezoana Bescherelle & Cardot, Bull. Soc. Bot. Genève, sér. 2, 1: 123. 1909  (Bartramiaceae) unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming by Griffin in FNA Vol. 28, 2014; “Plants of Philonotis yezoana are easily recognized by their dark green color and centrally papillose laminal cells” (Griffin, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).]

 

However, the species has been reported in a paper by Kosovich-Anderson & Weber in 2011:

PARK CO.: SNF, Beartooth Plateau: Lake Creek: rapids, overlook “Lake Creek Waterfall” 50 m N of HWY 212, sheltered granite outcrops lining the waterfall, under the steep bank forested by Pseudotsuga menziesii, Pinus contorta, and Picea sp. on thin wet soil covering an outcrop’s surface, shaded by spruce, in splash zone of the waterfall, assoc.: Blindia acuta and leafy liverworts, T57N R107W S8, 44*55.485-490’N, 109*41.670-675’ W, elev. ca. 7,500 ft (2280m), 26 Aug 2009, Kosovich-Anderson 5850 (COLO, DUKE); also steep rocky bank forested with Picea sp., over rock on a patch of soil, in splash zone of creek, forms scarce admixture to Scapaia sp., T57N R107W S17, 44*55.350-355’ N, 109*42.430-435’W, elev. ca. 6,900 ft (2100 m), 5 Aug 2010, Kosovich-Anderson 8397 [no herbarium given]; “the irregularly subquadrate and rectangular leaf cells with single massive central papillae on both surfaces, along with the dark green color, make the species easy to recognize” (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

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PHYSCOMITRIUM (Bridel) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 815. 1827 ·(Funariaceae)  

Gymnostomum subg. Physcomitrium Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 97. 1826

 

Physcomitrium hookeri Hampe, Icon. Musc., 30.   1844       (Funariaceae) unillo

Gymnostomum latifolium Hooker in T. Drummond, Musci Amer., Brit. N. Amer., 16. 1828 not Bridel

 

Gymnostomum latifolium Hook. in Drumm. (not Bridel 1827)

Physcomitrium coloradense Britt.

Physcomitrium hians Lindb.

Physcomitrium latifolium (Hook.) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Montana, Wyoming; Utah; Manitoba, N. Dakota, Kansas, Minninnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin. (As Physcomitrium coloradense E. G. Britton) “A rare plant, collected but once. Stream bank, Millbrook.” Albany County (Porter, 602), Porter, 193. (= P. hookeri Hamp. fid. Crum et And. Bryologist 58: 10. 1955.) Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: Millbrook, on soil, along a stream bank, 7,600 ft., Porter 602, c. fr. May 20, 1930 (TENN, det. Grout as Ph. coloradense). CROOK CO.; near Hulett, on soil, Marion Ownbey coll. 556a (TENN) (Porter det. as Ph. turbinatum: “a form with some entire leaves, and costa somewhat excurrent!”, but note huge revoluble annulus.

 

In Grout, leaves may be percurrent, even though Crum & Anderson indicate they are subpercurrent to 4-5 cells below apex. Grout says leaves are mostly entire.)

 

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Physcomitrium pyriforme (Hedwig) Hampe, Linnaea 11: 80. 1837   1801     (Funariaceae) unillo

Gymnostomum pyriforme Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 38. 1801  

 

Physcomitrium californicum E. Britt.

Physcomitrium drummondii E. Britt.

Physcomitrium kellermanii E. Britt. [Anderson, Crum, Buck, 1990, which was accepted by Lawton]

Physcomitrium megalocarpum Kindb.

Physcomitrium pygmaeum James

Physcomitrium turbinatum (Michx.) E. Britt. [Earlier checklist authors = C. M. ex Lesq. & James   synonymy emended FNA Vol. 27, 2007

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Physcomitrium turbinatum (Michx.) Brid). Crook Co., Porter, 1937. (hom. illeg. = P. pyriforme (Hedw.) Hamp. fid. Crum et And., Bryologist 58: 5. 1955.) The Porter citation from Crook County may be Marion Ownbey's specimen which is Ph. hookeri. See discussion above. Note this species does not occur in the Pacific Northwest. Flowers includes it in Utah “from Manitoba to Utah and Texas” p. 311. Crum & Anderson also speculated that the species does not occur west of the Great Plains.

 

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PLAGIOBRYOIDES J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 24. 2005 (Bryaceae)

 

Plagiobryoides vinosula (Cardot) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 91: 499. 2009

Brachymenium vinosulum Cardot, Rev. Bryol. 38: 6. 1911     (Bryaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Brachymenium vinosulum) HOT SPRINGS. Thermopolis, Hot Springs State Park, east bank of the Big Horn River, Rainbow Terraces, on vertical surface of the terrace, washed with geothermal waters, Temp. ca 90-95 F (32-35C); T43N, R94W, Section 31 bc; 43*39' N, 108* 11'W, elev.: 4330 ft (1320m); 28 Sept, 2003 Kosovich-Anderson, N 81 (RM,COLO,ASC). not seen. See Y Kosovich-Anderson & Spence, 2008.

 

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PLAGIOBRYUM Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 19: 606. 1863 (Bryaceae)

Zieria Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 68. 1856, not Smith 1798 [Rutaceae]

 

Plagiobryum zierii (Dickson ex Hedwig) Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 19: 606. 1863 (as zierii)  (Bryaceae)

Bryum zieri Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 182, plate 44, figs. 1–5. 1801 (as zierii)

 

Pohlia zieri (Hedwig) Schwägrichen (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

“... the species is probably relictual in the Rocky Mountains south of the glacialm aximum and presumably reached its current distribution during the Pleistocene. Populations south of the glacial ice sheets in the Rockies survived in refugia such as Colorado and expanded north during the Holocene” (Spence in Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

PARK CO., SNF, foothills of the Beartooth Plateau, Clarks Fork of Yellowstone River, immediately SE of junction of Muddy Creek and Clarks Fork of Yellowstone River, gravel shore of Clarks Fork, massive granite boulders along the shore in seasonal splash zone, on wet clayey substrate in a rock crevice, not abundant, T57N R107W S28, 44*53.965-970’N, 109*40.310-315’W, elev. ca. 6,600 ft (2000 m), 26 Aug 2009, Kosovich-Anderson 5951 (ASC, COLO) “Det. by J. Spence”; also approx. 0.05 mi N-NE of Clarks Fork of Yellowstone River and Crazy Creek confluence, cataracts of Crazy Creek, seeping granite cliff, on a soaked humus soil, in shade, scattered among other bryophytes; Cephaloziella sp. and Mnium sp. T57N R107W S3&10, 44*56.600-620’N, 109*46.555-565’W, elev. ca. 6,900 ft (2100)m), 3 Aug 2010 Kosovich-Anderson 7972 [without herbarium designation] Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

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[Plagiomnium affine (Bland. ex Funck) T. Kop. (Mnium affine, Porter, 1935) = Mnium affine Bland. ex Funck, excluded from the North American flora by Anderson, et al., 1990. Not reported for the flora of North America (FNA VOl. 28, 2014).

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park,(1521) (Roell 1893)]]

 

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PLAGIOMNIUM T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 145, figs. 14, 15, 20, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 43, 47, 60, 69, 78, 81, 98, 100. 1968  (Mniaceae)

 

Plagiomnium ciliare (Müller Hal.) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 146. 1968   (Mniaceae)

Mnium affine var. ciliare Müller Hal., Syn. Musc. Frond. 1: 159. 1848, based on Bryum ciliare Greville, Ann. Lyceum Nat. Hist. New York 1: 273, plate 23 [upper left]. 1825, not Dickson 1801

 

Mnium ciliare (C. Muell.) Schimp.

Plagiomnium ciliare (C. Muell.) Koponen

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

ALBANY CO.: Antelope Basin, on wet banks of the stream, Aven Nelson 7500. Plants of Wyoming exs. det. Holzinger (RM), female plants. CARBON CO.: [female plants], 8,500 ft., C. L. & M. W. Porter 9714 (RM).

 

The leaf cells are thick walled and porose, the leaves long decurrent on fertile stems, “not or slightly decurrent on sterile stems” (Lawton).

 

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Plagiomnium cuspidatum  (Hedwig) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 146. 1968

Mnium cuspidatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 192, plate 45, figs. 5–8. 1801       (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Mnium cuspidatum Leyss.

Mnium cuspidatum var. tenellum Kindb. in Macoun & Kindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Rogers Canyon, Albany Co. (Porter, 768a); Little Goose Creek, Sheridan Co. (Aven Nelson, 2366 & 2376), Porter, 1935. (As Plagiomnium cuspidatum (Hedw.) T. Kop.) Teton Co., Spence 1985. (As M. cuspidatum var. tenellum Kindb.) Laramie Mts., Albany County (Aven Nelson, 4308), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO. (Laramie Hills), Aven Nelson, 1898, 4308 (RM); C.L.Porter, Aug. 6, 1934 (RM). CROOK CO.  Devil’s Tower National Monument; 4050 ft., no. 1698 (RM).  PARK CO., 7500 ft., F. J. Hermann 20046 (RM).

 

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Plagiomnium drummondii (Bruch & Schimper) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 146. 1968

Mnium drummondii Bruch & Schimper, London J. Bot. 2: 669. 1843 (as drummondi)     (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Mnium drummondii Bruch & Schimp.

Plagiomnium drummondii (Bruch & Schimp.) Kop.

 

Not noted for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Northern affinities (Brit. Colo. to Nova Scotia and S to Washington, Montana, Minn., Mich., New York, rep. from Penn., W. Va., and Maryland, sec. Crum & Anderson).

 

SHERIDAN CO.: July 16, 1896, Aven Nelson 2366 (RM).

 

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Plagiomnium ellipticum (Bridel) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 8: 367. 1971

Mnium ellipticum Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 3: 53. 1817                    (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Mnium affine Bland. ex Funck, sensu lato. excluded from N. Amer. by Crum et al. 1973.

Mnium affine var. rugicum (Laur.) B.S.G.

Mnium affine var. rugicum (Laur.) Bruch & Schimp. in B. S. G.

Mnium rugicum Laur.

Plagiomnium rugicum (Laur.) Kop.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Yuk., Cal.; in the mid west and in E. N. America from Labrador and Quebec to Penn.) (As Mnium affine Bland.) Albany, Big Horn cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. (As Mnium affine var. rugicum (Laur.) B.S.G. Park Co.: Plagiomnium ellipticum was reported growing with Polytrichum juniperinum, Sarmentypnum exannulatum, S. sarmentosum and Sanionia nivalis (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

 Co. unknown: Camp Davis, Willow Creek, 1942 Wehmeyer 3014 (MICH).” (Koponen, 1971).

 

ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., 8000 ft., F.J. Hermann 17723 (RM). ALBANY CO.: Centennial, 1896 Nelson 2670 (NY), 1902 Nelson 8819 (US, WTU) 8000 ft, 1962 Hermann 17723 (US); Antelope Basin, 1900 Nelson 7500 (K, NY, US, WTU); Pole Creek, 1932 Porter 1027 (WTU). FREMONT CO.: Dubois, Togwotee Pass, 9000 ft, 1931 Frye (WTU). TETON CO.: Grand Tetons Nat. Park, 1964 Sharp & Sharp D3-b (MICH). YELLOWSTONE NAT. PARK: Leg. Roell 1521 (P); Snake R., 1899 Nelson & Nelson 6426 (K, NY, US); Old Faithful, Firehole R., 1934 Frye (CAN, WTU).  (As P. ellipticum) ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn along WY11, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix dominant, Buck 23225 (NY). (As P. ellipticum) var. rugicum, FREMONT CO., 7800 ft., F.J. Hermann 25539 (RM). (As Plagiomnium rugicum) JOHNSON CO.; 5600 - 6000 ft., Odasz 1263 (RM, BUF).

PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; alpine bogs of east summit, east slope, head of Wyoming Creek, 3250 msm, W. A. Weber B-44258 (RM, COLO) Aug. 19, 1973; wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1780 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. PARK CO. T 54 N, R 104 W Sec. 15., 9600-9900 ft.,  H. no. 22341 (RM). (As Plagiomnium ellipticum var. rugicum): SUBLETTE CO.: Gros Ventre Mts., 8500 ft, 1900 Curtis (NY). SUBLETTE CO., 7950 ft., F.J. Hermann 25336 (RM); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/4 mile SW of Barnes Lake, 9780 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°36'W. Pothole fen. [variable teeth, blunt; thin transversely elongate cell walls] Richard Andrus 7810 (BING). TETON CO: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris, July 6, 1985 with Distichium capillaceum, Aulacomnium palustre, Brachythecium salebrosum, Cratoneuron filicinum, Mnium marginatum, Eckel 94082107 (BUF). TETON CO.: Grand Tetons Nat. Park, 1964 Sharp & Sharp D3-b (MICH). YELLOWSTONE NAT. PARK: Leg. Roell 1521 (P); Snake R., 1899 Nelson & Nelson 6426 (K, NY, US); Old Faithful, Firehole R., 1934 Frye (CAN, WTU). (As M. affine var. rugicum) YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: T.C. Frye, July 6, 1934 (RM).

 

The erect, fertile stems are shorter than the plagiotropic, sterile elongate stems that can form extensive mats. The laminal and bordering cells are very thin, porose, not thickened at the corners. The leaves may have rather long, thin decurrencies due to the narrow and ellongate marginal cells extending down the stem. Mats are a rather sordid yellow-green, with yellowish stems and leaves,  as opposed to the rustry-red mats of Mnium arizonicum (red stems with green leaves).

 

Both Plagiomnium ellipticum (Brid.) Kop. (= Mnium rugicum Laur.) and P. rostratum (Schrad.) Kop. overlap in characters. P. ellipticum has broader, more [transversely] elongate leaf cells, whereas P. rostratum has smaller and more isodiametric laminal cells (Koponen, Lindbergia 2: 160-184, A guide to the Mniaceae in Canada) p. 180 ff.) [Crum & And. also say the cells walls are collenchymatous p.599 but their illustration shows transversely elongate leaf cells, too]. Both species may show no teeth on the margins. Ultimately, P. ellipticum grows in fens and P. rostratum “prefers calcareous rocks”, and soil in woods. P. rostratum is said to have “no decurrent leaf bases, or only very shortly decurrent leaves” which accounts for its frequent confusion with P. ellipticum. The Teton Co. specimen has transversely elongate leaf cells, barely or hardly decurrent with stubby little teeth nearly to the base. Its costa is percurrent into a little reflexed cusp, whereas many Plagiomnia are subpercurrent. The cell walls are pitted, especially evident toward the costa and the bottom half of the big leaves. Note this species is quite rumpled up on drying, but it is elevated away from the stem, not twisted around it. To get leaves to lie flat for viewing on the slide, wet the stem in water and cover with a cover slip. Hold a lighter under the slide until it boils (wipe carbon away with a tissue). This is also a technique used to study the Polytrichaceae.

 

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Plagiomnium insigne (Mitten) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 146. 1968

Mnium insigne Mitten, Hooker’s J. Bot. Kew Gard. Misc. 8: 230. 1856         (Mniaceae)

 

Plagiomnium insigne (Mitt.) Koponen

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014). The species is more common along the west coast.

 

?SHERIDAN CO.: problem with packet.

 

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Plagiomnium medium (Bruch & Schimper) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 146. 1968

Mnium medium Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 4: 196, plate 398. 1838      (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Plagiomnium medium subsp. curvatulum (Lindberg) T. J. Koponen (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

Plagiomnium. medium var. curvatulum (Lindberg) H. A. Crum & L. E. Anderson (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

SHERIDAN CO.: “Floating on water and on logs and branches in slow flowing water” Bighorn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 28, McKee 92-049, c.fr. dehisced empty, June 25, 1992 (BUF, RM).

 

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Plagiomnium rostratum (Schrader) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 147. 1968

Mnium rostratum Schrader, Bot. Zeitung (Regensburg) 1: 79. 1802; M. longirostrum Bridel       (Mniaceae)

 

Bryum longirostrum (Brid.) Brid.

Hypnum rostratum (schrad.) Web. & Mohr

Mnium longirostrum Brid.

Mnium longirostrum Brid.

Mnium rostratum Schrad.

Plagiomnium rostratum (Schrad.) T. Kop.

 

Not noted for Wyoming in FNA Vol. 28, 2014.

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; in the Mid. west, and in eastern North America from New Jersey to South Carolina (Crum & Anderson, 1981 p.599). (As Mnium rostratum Schrad.) Albany, Carbon, Fremont cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. ALBANY CO.: wet shaded bank of stream in spruce grove 1 1/4 S of Brooklyn Lake, Medicine Bow Mts., 10,000 ft., 9 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17700 (WTU). Hermann identified this specimen as Mnium rugicum “form with entire leaf-margins”, a determination with which I am inclined to agree. However, T. Koponen determined this specimen as Mnium rostratum, and I defer to his experience. The latter, however, is characteristic of more mesic sites, growing on calcareous rocks - see discussion on Plagiomnium ellipticum above. JOHNSON CO.: c. fr. rostrate T52N, R84W, Sec. 25, 5600-6000’ No. 1262 M Odasz; T52N. R84W Sec. 25, 5600-6000 ft., Odasz no. 1260, c. fr.

 

Plagiomnium ellipticum does not have the collenchymatous cell walls of P. rostratum, whose cell walls are thicker and not porose.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: MniaPlagiomniumRostratum_Web
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PLAGIOTHECIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 179, plates 494–506. 1851 (Plagiotheciaceae)

Stereodon sect. Plagiothecium (Schimper) Mitten

 

[Plagiothecium cavifolium (Brid.) Iwats. Excluded, wrong det.]

 

Hypnum sullivantiae (Sull.) Sull. & Lesq.

Plagiothecium fallax Card. & Thér.

Plagiothecium roseanum B.S.G.

Plagiothecium sullivantiae Sull. in Gray

 

Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5242), Porter, 1935 (as Plagiothecium roseanum (Hampe) B.&S. [has been reidentified (RM) as Isopterygiopsis pulchella, q.v.]

 

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Plagiothecium denticulatum (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 190. 1851

Hypnum denticulatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 237. 1801          (Plagiotheciaceae)

 

Hypnum donnianum Smith

Hypnum obtusifolium (Turner) Bridel

Plagiothecium denticulatum var. bullulae Grout

Plagiothecium ruthei Limpricht

Plagiothecium sandbergii Renauld & Cardot

Plagiothecium sylvaticum var. squarrosum Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany County and Teton County, Porter, 1935. Albany, Carbon, Teton cos., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: 10,000 ft. Medicine Bow Mts., F.J. Hermann 17763 (RM); Centennial, Lake Marie, alt, 10,000 ft. T. T. Frye & R. Ireland, June 25, 1931, st. (WTU). CARBON CO.: on rotten wood & soil, lake shore, Stamp Mill Lake, 10,000 ft., C. L. Porter, Aug. 28, 1935, 2083, c.fr. (WTU). SUBLETTE CO.: Wind River site, Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range. 15/viii/1989, Barnes Lake, ca. 9,747 ft., 42°59'N, 109°36'W, Pothole fen, Richard Andrus 7809 (BING) in packet of Brachythecium oedipodium. TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25565 (RM, WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Crescent Hill, E. Lawton, Aug. 17, 1953, 1850 c.fr. (WTU).

 

A large, flabby, delicate plant with large, broad decurrencies of hyaline, rounded, thin-walled cells. The leaf cells are long- rhomboidal, vs. linear-flexuose as in P. laetum (cf. Crum & Anderson p. 1096. Care must be taken to remove the alar cells with their distinctive circular cells, which may be fragile and remain behind on the stem on dissection, in which case one might tend to the erroneous confusion with P. laetum.

 

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Plagiothecium piliferum (Swartz) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 186. 1851

Leskea pilifera Swartz in C. J. Hartman, Handb. Skand. Fl., 419. 1820        (Plagiotheciaceae)

 

Dolichotheca pilifera (Swartz) Podpĕra

Isopterygium piliferum (Swartz) Loeske

Plagiotheciella pilifera (Swartz) Brotherus (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Not yet noted for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

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[Platydictya confervoides (Bridel) H. A. Crum, Michigan Bot. 3: 60. 1964    EXCLUDED]

 

Amblystegiella confervoides (Brid.) Loeske

Amblystegium pseudoconfervoides Kindb.

Hypnum confervoides Brid.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Amblystegiella confervoides (Brid.) Loeske.) “On limestone rocks, Rogers Canyon, Albany County (Porter, 950). This is a somewhat doubtful determination” (Porter, 1935).

 

This species appears to be native to eastern North America, with specimens from Alaska and the Yukon (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)]

 

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PLATYDICTYA Berkeley, Handb. Brit. Mosses, 145. 1863  (Amblystegiaceae)

Serpoleskea (Hampe) Loeske

 

Platydictya jungermannioides (Bridel) H. A. Crum, Michigan Bot. 3: 60. 1964

Hypnum jungermannioides Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 2: 255. 1812     (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Amblystegiella sprucei (Spruce) Loeske (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Leskea sprucei Brush ex Spruce (earlier Wyoming checklist)

 

(As Amblystegiella sprucei (Bruch) Loeske) Mammoth, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mountains, Barber Lake Picnic area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek, 8720-8740 ft., Pinus contorta forest; at base of Populus tremuloides, N.G. Miller 10,253 (NYS) June 7, 1993. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, ss rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley, shaded sandstone rock, July 5, 1985. P. M. Eckel 9612510 (BUF) with Drepanocladus uncinatus. TETON CO.: 7,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25572 (RM); Pinus-Pseudotsuga-forests, primitive rocks about 2260 msm, on soil soc. Trichodon cylindricum c.sp., Duell 2245, Aug. 7, 1981 (NY); Teton Co., on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger- Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris, c.fr. July 6, 1985, with Brachythecium salebrosum, Campylium chrysophyllum, Cratoneuron filicinum, Distichium capillaceum, Mnium marginatum, Plagiomnium ellipticum, Drepanocladus aduncus, Aulacomnium palustre, Eckel 94082112 (BUF).

 

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PLATYGYRIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 95, plate 458. 1851, name conserved  (Hypnaceae)

 

Platygyrium repens (Bridel) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 98. 1851

Pterigynandrum repens Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 1: 131. 1806          (Hypnaceae)

 

Platygyrium orthoclados Kindberg

Platygyrium repens var. ascendens (Schwägrichen) Grout

Platygyrium repens var. orthoclados Kindberg (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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PLEUROZIUM (Sullivant) Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 12: 537. 1869, name conserved Mitten (Hylocomiaceae)

Hypnum sect. Pleurozium Sullivant in A. Gray, Manual ed. 2, 668. 1856

 

Pleurozium schreberi (Willdenow ex Bridel) Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 12: 537. 1869

Hypnum schreberi Willdenow ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 88. 1801      (Hylocomiaceae)

 

Calliergon schreberi (Bridel) Mitten

Calliergonella schreberi (Bridel) Grout

Calliergonella  schreberi var. tananae (Grout) Grout

Pleurozium schreberi var. tananae (Grout) Wijk & Margadant (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

All states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: wet soil, Norris Geyser Basin, Aug. 14, 1925, T. C. Frye (WTU); near Giant Paint Pot, Aug. 16, 1925, T. C. Frye (WTU).

 

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POGONATUM P. Beauvois, Mag. Encycl. 5: 329. 1804  (Polytrichaceae)

 

Pogonatum urnigerum (Hedwig) P. Beauvois, Prodr. Aethéogam., 84. 1805

Polytrichum urnigerum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 100, plate 22, figs. 5–  7. 1801   (Polytrichaceae)

 

Not reported for Wyoming in FNA Vol. 27, 2007 - new to Wyoming.

 

PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Shoshone National Forest, Little Bear Creek, ca. 100 m W of the National Forest Rd #151 dead end, north-facing granite cliff ledge, on sandy substrate, forming an admixture with Paraleucobryum enerve;  T57N R105W S11, 44*56.480-490’ N, 109*30.980-990’W, elev. ca. 9,700 ft (2950 m), 14 August 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 2712 (MO, RM) (in Kosovich-Anderson 2011b).

 

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POHLIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 171. 1801  (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Pohlia Hedwig (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

  Species in Wyoming with gemmae in the leaf axils are:

     Group A.  Pohlia andalusica,  P. drummondii, P.  tundrae [laminate]

     Group B.  Pohlia  camptotrachela,  P. proligera,               [peg-like]

 

  Those without gemmae are the species:

  P. bolanderi, P. cruda, P. elongate, P. ludwigii, P. ludwigii, P. nutans, P. obtusifolia and

  P.  wahlenbergii.

 

   These axial gemmae are composed of a gemma-body and little structures at the gemma apex known as  'leaf primordia'  presumably because these processes are the initial phases of leaves or develop into leaves once the gemma begins establishing itself as a plant. Actually the gemma-body itself may represent a primordial branch. Sometimes the leaf primordia are not confined to the gemma apex, but may appear lower down on the gemma body.

  These primordia are of two kinds:

     - those multicellular ones that actually look like leaves (laminate, or leaf-like processes)

       Group A

    -  and those generally unicellular ones that appear to be only elongate cellular extensions

       of the cells at the gemma apex (peg-like processes) (Group B).

  For an excellent treatment of the Pohlia species with propagules, see Shaw, Jonathan A. 1981. A taxonomic revision of the propaguliferous species of Pohlia (Musci) in North America. Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory. pp. 1-81 with good illustrations of the gemmae.

 

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Pohlia andalusica (Höhnel) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 218[I,3]: 551. 1903    (Mielichhoferiaceae) unillo

Webera andalusica Höhnel, Sitzungsber. Kaiserl. Akad. Wiss., Wien, Math.-Naturwiss. Cl., Abt. 1, 104: 326. 1895

 

Pohlia annotina var. glareola (Ruthe & Grebe in Grebe) Broth.

Pohlia glareola (Ruthe & Grebe in Grebe.) Broth. in Engl. & Prantl.

Pohlia hercynica Warnst. in Bauer.

Pohlia rothii var. compacta Ruthe & Loeske in Loeske

See also synonymy p. 41 in Shaw, 1981a.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Teton Co., Grand Teton National Park, 7 km W of Teton Park Rd. on Signal Mtn. Summit Rd., Shaw 2704 (ALTA) (Shaw, 19981a, p.43).

 

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[Pohlia annotina (Hedw.) Lindb. var. annotina: see Pohlia camptotrachela (Renauld & Cardot) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prant. Pohlia annotina is to be looked for in Wyoming as “Pohlia annotina is the most widespread and common gemmiferous species in eastern North America and along the Pacific coast” (Shaw, FNA Vol.28, 2014). Not yet reported for Wyoming. ]

 

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Pohlia bolanderi (Lesquereux) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 218[I,3]: 548. 1903

Bryum bolanderi Lesquereux, Mem. Calif. Acad. Sci. 1: 22. 1868          (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Pohlia bolanderi var. seriata A. J. Shaw

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Pohlia bolanderi var. seriata) ALBANY CO.: peaty vertical bank of trail along Lewis Lake, alt. 10,800 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., ca. 11 miles W of Centennial, F. J. Hermann 17716 (RM), Aug. 3, 1962. SUBLETTE CO.: 11,200 ft., alpine moist area, H. Rolston III 85122 (COLO State U.); under spruce in moist forest, 10,055 ft. H. Rolston III 86023 (CSU).

 

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Pohlia camptotrachela (Renauld & Cardot) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 218[I,3]: 552. 1903    (Mielichhoferiaceae) unillo

Webera camptotrachela Renauld & Cardot, Bot. Gaz. 13: 199, plate 16. 1888

 

(From the earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Bryum camptotrachelum (Ren. & Card.) Paris.

Bryum nutans ssp. camptotrachelum (Ren. & Card.) Kindb.

 

Wyoming (Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Teton Co.: Bradley Lake Trail, 7000 ft., Shaw 2692 (ALTA) (Shaw, 1981a, p. 72).

 

Pohlia annotina (Hedw.) Lindb. var. annotina:

Pohlia annotina has not been collected in the Rocky Mountains south of Canada ... (reports of P. annotina var. annotina are mostly P. camptotrachela).” (Shaw, 1981).

 

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Pohlia cruda (Hedwig) Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 18. 1879

Mnium crudum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 189. 1801        (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

(Synonymy from an earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Bryum crudum (Hedw.) Turn.

Webera cruda (Hedw.) Fuernr.

Webera macroapiculata C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun,

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1514), Upper Falls (1500) (Roell 1893).

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Cal., Ariz., Col; Minnes., Iowa, Ont.; Greenland, Quebec, New Brun., New Eng. Pennsyl. Albany, Carbon cos., Porter, 1935. “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: PM Eckel 871108 (BUF); woodland bog, Medicine Bow Mts., [published label Plants of Wyoming. coll. Aven Nelson, Det. J. M. Holzinger set 7823] c. fr. deoperculate July 30, 1900 (RM); young fruit, soil on wet, rocky edge of stream in aspens, 8590 ft., Laramie, Hermann 24867, June 7, 1972 (RM). CARBON CO.: moss-covered peaty bank of Trail Creek W of Sand Lake, 9000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 41/2 SW Morgan, c. fr. Aug. 6, 1962, Hermann 17805 (RM); southeastern county, Medicine Bow Mts., on the Sand Lake road at Trail Creek, 9,200 ft., Spruce-Fir zone, soil in forest, common, C.L. Porter 9700, c.fr. operculate Aug. 11, 1964 (RM). JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn Mtns. in mixed conifer forest, 9400 ft., Nelson & Fonken 7264, c.fr. Aug. 17, 1980, operculate (BUF, RM). PARK CO.: Hermann 25568 (RM). SHERIDAN CO.: Mineral soil on limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-023, c. fr. indehiscent, ecalyptrate, June 16, 1992 (BUF, RM), with Mnium blyttii. SUBLETTE CO.: moist soil on rock under ledge on west shore of Lower Green River Lake, 7950, Wind River Range, 50 miles N Pinedale, Hermann 25328 (RM); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake with Polytrichastrum alpinum (Hedw.) G.Sm. Richard Andrus 7791a (BING). TETON CO.: peaty soil in wet ditch along Hidden Falls Trail, NW shore of Jenny Lake, 7000 ft. Teton Range, Grand Teton Natl. Centennial Valley, c.fr. Aug. 17, 1896, Aven Nelson 2657 (RM).

 

Large flat leaves, distant on the bright red stem below where leaves are small and often hyaline. Stem is usually a bright or dark red compared to the glacine green yellow-white to blue-green (glaucous) leaves. Leaves NOT decurrent. Leaf margins PLANE (except in perichaetial leaves), no border, toothed [cf. Bryum wiegelii, with strongly decurrent leaf bases, distant on stem, bordered]. In fruiting or female plants the perichaetial leaves are conspicuously longer than the subtending leaves, quite thinner and in some contrast with the stem leaves (makes one want to jump at P. longibracteata). Is DIOICOUS, but also paroicous and synoicous). Can be a dull green, but especially in the upper leaves always with a vitreous or metallic superficial sheen. Confused with P. wahlenbergii - see key by Flowers p. 341-2. Crum & Anderson introduce the interesting observation that the exothecial cells irregularly thickened, wavy for P. wahlenbergii, but less so in P. cruda, so this is not very good. Perhaps the sheen is important to cruda. If fortunate enough to have perigonial bracts, both they and the perichaetial are to 7 mm long (Lawton): in P. wahlenbergii they are shorter: my specimen to 1.5 mm. Flowers makes the critical distinction based on leaf cell size and capsule. P. cruda: leaf cells 7-10 µm wide with elongate capsule, P. wahlenbergii 15-22 µm with short, pyriform capsule. Flowers says P. wahlenbergii leaf cells are 15-22 µm wide, whereas P. cruda have leaf cells 7-10um wide. Also leaves not much shriveled when dry whereas P. wahlenbergii is lax and shrivelled when dry.

 

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Pohlia drummondii (Müller Hal.) A. L. Andrews in A. J. Grout, Moss Fl. N. Amer. 2: 196. 1935

Bryum drummondii Müller Hal., Bot. Zeitung (Berlin) 20: 328. 1862 (as drummondi)      (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Pohlia commutata Lindberg

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Teton Co., banks of Bradley Lake Trail, Shaw 2695 ALTA (Shaw, 1981). “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981.

 

PARK CO.: (in specimen of Desmatodon latifolius) along stream near Bear Tooth Lodge at 9000 ft., Aug. 20, 1953, c.fr., E. Lawton 1933 (WTU) - red stem throughout, material fertile and fruiting.

 

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Pohlia elongata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 171. 1801

Pohlia acuminata Hoppe & Hornschuch (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Pohlia elongata var. greenii (Bridel) A. J. Shaw

Pohlia polymorpha Hoppe & Hornschuch

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014). The species is widespread in North America but not common (Shaw in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1723, in part), Porter, 1935.

 

[Pohlia lescuriana (Sullivant) Ochi, J. Fac. Educ. Tottori Univ., Nat. Sci. 19: 31. 1968, excluded.

 

Not reported for Wyoming; “Pohlia lescuriana is an inconspicuous woodland species in eastern North America” (Shaw, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935 (probably a misidentification).]

 

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Pohlia longicolla (Hedwig) Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 18. 1879 (as longicollis)

Webera longicolla Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 169, plate 41, figs. 1–5. 1801      (Mielichhoferiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming , a species that is “relatively rare in North America” (Shaw in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Pohlia longicollis (Sw.) Lindberg): Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Upper Fall, 7000 ped. alt., c. fr. (1498-99) (Roell 1893).

 

BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns; east end of Battle Park, ca. 9 air miles SW of Cloud Peak, ca. 20 air miles ESE of Basin. Sandstone ledges, elev. 9100 ft. Nelson & Fonken 7354, c. fr. deoperculated Aug. 19, 1980 (RM, Ithaca College, see Eckel, 1992.)

 

(Pohlia longicolla (Hedw.) Lindb. new to Wyoming. 1992. Evansia 9(2): 43-44.

 

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Pohlia ludwigii (Sprengel ex Schwägrichen) Brotherus, Acta Soc. Sci. Fenn. 19(12): 27. 1892

Bryum ludwigii Sprengel ex Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(2): 95, plate 68 [right]. 1816 (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Bryum bigelovii Sull.

Mniobryum ludwigii (Schwaegr.) Loeske

Webera ludwigii (Schwaegr. )Schimp.

 

Not reported from Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming; Colo. reported from Calif. Brooklyn Lake, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7883), Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.: Telephone Mines, A. Nelson 7883 (RM). FREMONT CO. 8600 ft. F.J. Hermann 25303 (RM).

 

NOTE: For distinction from P. wahlenbergii, see that species. P. ludwigii is the largest species of the genus and is closely related and similar to P. drummondii, which has propagula (branch primordia, see Andrews p. 196, Vol. 2). Both have recurved leaf margins in the upper part of the leaf, whereas P. wahlenbergii is plain.

 

[? var. microphylla Kindb. Not in 1990 checklist or in Index Muscorum]

Halleck Canyon, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7442), Porter, 1935.

 

Pohlia ludwigii is a rare alpine species, often found in habitats similar to those of P. obtusifolia and characterized by strongly decurrent leaves that are often slightly cucullate apically.  The older lower leaves generally have a pink to reddish tinge” (Shaw, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). 

 

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Pohlia nutans (Hedwig) Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 18. 1879

Webera nutans Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 168. 1801  (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Pohlia sphagnicola (Bruch & Schimper) Lindberg & Arnell

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1502, 1502, 1504) (Roell 1893).

In all st. and prov of the Pacific Northwest; Alska, Cal., Ariz., Nev., Colo.; in the Mid. West and eastern N. America from Nova Scotia to N. Carol. “Common throughout most of the State.” Albany, Big Horn, Carbon, Crook cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8000 ft., Schriever, 8 (RM). BIG HORN Co.: Hartman & Odasz 8800 c.fr. June; Nelson 4941 8600 c.fr. August. FREMONT CO.: on US26 & US287, 5 miles E of Togwotee Pass, S slope. Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000'. Picea-Pinus flexilis, Pinus contorta, xeric, c.fr. July 6, 1985 Eckel 94081606 (BUF). JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn Mts., on and around rotten log in mixed conifer forest, 9400 ft., Nelson & Fonken 7262, c.fr. operculate, Aug. 17, 1980 (BUF, RM). LINCOLN CO.: 7800 ft., Goodman 5135 (RM). PARK CO.: Absaroka Range, by mine effluent flow in soil wetted by the copper enriched water, Kastning-Culp 3101 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., openings in valley and on slopes, 8800 ft., Hartman & Odasz 9247, c.fr. June 23, 1979 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: in montane lake, 10,190 ft., H. Rolston III 85126 (COLO St. U.); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 4. 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/4 mile SW of Barnes Lake, 9780 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°36'W. Pothole fen. Richard Andrus 7808 (BING); Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, ss rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley. July 5, 1985, punky log, P. M. Eckel 9612513 (BUF, RM) + Saonia uncinata, Brachythecium salebrosum, Eurrhynchium. TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25573 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: A. Nelson & E. Nelson 5846 (RM). [Hayden Forest, head of Soldier Creek, 9500 feet, common on sour soils, abundant locally, Rose 220 1/2, c. fr., dehisced, Sept. 11, 1923 (RM). La Plata Mines, Nelson 5175, good, deoperculate fruit Aug. 25, 1898 (RM).

 

NOTE: When dissecting for sexual structures, the antheridia on the fruiting stem are usually very evident in this species (they are conspicuously large) - they will not appear so in fruiting stems of the other common Pohlia, P. wahlenbergii, or the rare P. drummondii, because these are dioicous.

 

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Pohlia obtusifolia (Villars ex Bridel) L. F. Koch, Leafl. W. Bot. 6: 20. 1950

Bryum obtusifolium Villars ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(3): 52. 1803         (Mielichhoferiaceae) unillo

 

Bryum cucullatum (Schwägrichen) Bruch ex Hochstetter

Pohlia cucullata (Schwägrichen) Bruch ex Hochstetter

Webera cucullata (Schwaegr.) Schimp.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

FREMONT CO.: Gannett Peak area, Wind River Range, base of Gannett Glacier, 12,000 ft., wet places near a creek, Jozwik 460, c. young fruit, Aug. 5, 1963 (RM). PARK CO.: 3200 msm, rills and snowbeds, W.A. Weber B-44319 (COLO, RM).

 

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Pohlia proligera (Kindberg) Lindberg ex Arnell, Bot. Not. 1894: 54. 1894

Webera proligera Kindberg, Forh. Vidensk.-Selsk. Kristiania 1888(6): 30. 1888     (Mielichhoferiaceae)

 

Not reported from Wyoming although it “is a relatively common species in boreal and high-montane habitats”  (Shaw, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Idaho. Wyoming; Alask, Yuk., Nev.; Minn.; Mich.; Greenland, Quebec. From Shaw, l981, v. P. andalusica, Teton Co., Spence 1985. ((Shaw Teton 2702 ALTA). ALBANY CO.: 7800 ft., F.J. Hermann 25929 (RM). CARBON CO.: Sierra Madre Range, on Bridger Peak, elev. 10,400-11,004', sub-alpine, Nancy Kastning-Culp 1063 (BUF).

 

The linear, twisted, vermicular or worm-like gemmae in the axils of especially the upper leaves of this species have either one or two erect unicellular extensions (leaf primordia) at the apex. Usually one of these apical primordial is longer than the other. These gemmae are distinguished from those of the eastern and western species, P. annotina, with similar gemmae but which have 2-5 leaf primordial at their apices.

 

The base of the leaf itself is not decurrent but the majority of leaves are transversely rather straight across. However strips of the stem-cells often may come away on the margins or across the base of the leaf and give some leaves decurrencies.

 

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Pohlia tundrae A. J. Shaw, Bryologist 84: 65, figs. 1–10. 1981  (Mielichhoferiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

“... all reports of P. annotina var. decipiens from the mountains of Utah and Colorado are referable to P. tundrae” (Shaw, 1981). Teton Co., Spence 1985. “Teton Co., 7 km W of Teton Park Rd. on Signal Mtn. Summit Rd., Shaw 2709 (ALTA)” (in Shaw, 1981).

 

CARBON CO.: (P. annotina var. decipiens Loeske) Sierra Madre Mtns: Haggarty Creek just below Ferris-Haggarty mine, 9520 ft., wet soil by streamside, Kastning-Culp 3082 (BUF, RM). TETON CO.: (P. annotina var. decipiens) Togwotee Pass, 9650 ft., F.J. Hermann 25542 (RM). Characterized by “1. its compact growth form with short stems, 2. leaves with a distinct sheen when dry, and 3. large (>ca. 300 µm long), cylindric to elongate-obconic propagula with conspicuous laminate leaf primordia.” in Shaw, 1981.

 

“In the central Rockies, it has been collected from Arizona and southern Utah northward to Wyoming and Idaho.” Propagula are “rarely few or absent.” “intermixed with P. drummondii in alpine tundra habitats ... difficult to distinguish...”

 

                

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Pohlia wahlenbergii (F. Weber & D. Mohr) A. L. Andrews in A. J. Grout, Moss Fl. N. Amer. 2. 203. 1935

Hypnum wahlenbergii F. Weber & D. Mohr, Bot. Taschenbuch, 280, 475. 1807    (Mielichhoferiaceae) unillo

 

Bryum wahlenbergii (Web.& Mohr) Schwaegr.

Mniobryum albicans (Wahlenb.) Limpr.

Mniobryum wahlenbergii (Web. & Mohr) Jenn.

Mnium albicans Wahlenb.

Pohlia albicans (Wahlenb.) Lindb.

Webera albicans (Wahlenb.) Schimp.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

In all states and prov of the Pacific Northwest. Alaska, Ariz, Colo.; widespread in the Mid. West and in eastern N. Amer. “Across the southern part of the State,” Albany, Carbon, Sweetwater, Uinta cos., Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: densely shaded bertical bank of streamlet under thicket in meadow, 10,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mtns., 9 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17727 (RM); Centennial Hills, Nelson 1285, c. young fr. June 9, 1895 (RM); northwest base of Sheep Mtn. along WY Rte. 11; ca. 4 mi. due ESE of Centennial, can. 7,700-7,800 ft fen with low forest of Populus, Betula, Salix in shallow water, a “hanging bog” on steep hillside, open area of bog, W. D. Reese, 18180 (LAF, BUF, RM) June 7, 1993. CARBON CO.: Sierra Madre Mtns, Haggarty Creek, 8440 ft., moist soil by creek, Kastning-Culp 3038 (BUF, RM). CARBON CO.: Battle Lake, Nelson 4180 (leaves long-decurrent) (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: wet area in alpine, 10,595 ft., H. Rolston III 85102 (COLO St. U.). SWEETWATER CO.: North Vermillion Creek, Nelson 3576 (RM). TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25564 (RM). Hat [Cat] Six Falls, Nelson 5035 (RM); La Platte Mines, Nelson 5248 (RM).

 

NOTE: Leaves serrulate at apex in Pohlia wahlenbergii, in Bryum weigelii margins are entire. Both have leaves distant on the stem. Bryum weigellii also seems to have a more well-developed marginal border (partly bistratose, according to Lawton). Pohlia wahlenbergii sometimes has cells so large they are readily apparent in the dissecting microscope. The distinction from P. ludwigii is minimal, according to descriptions. P. ludwigii is recurved in the upper leaves, P. wahlenbergii is not. P. ludwigii does not form a definite border, P. wahlenbergii apparently does not either! They both have equally large cells: see Andrews for discussion. The plain upper leaf margins distinguish P. wahlenbergii from both P. drummondii and P. ludwigii. The decurrencies on P. wahlenbergii are generally not as long, as distinctive: but occasionally they are (Nelson 4180). Take them off carefully: long strip of costa down the stem comes off, too, reminiscent of Bryum pseudotriquetrum. NOTE: Lawton has P. wahlenbergii in both places in the key: they have and they have not decurrencies. If fortunate enough to have perigonial bracts, both they and the perichaetial leaves are to 7 mm long (Lawton): in P. wahlenbergii they are shorter: my specimen to 1.5 mm. Flowers says P. wahlenbergii cells are 15-22 µm wide, whereas those of P. cruda are 7-10 µm wide. Leaves of P. ludwigii may be pink at the base, suffused with pink, the leaves. According to Andrews P. ludwigii cells are 1: 3, P. wahlenbergii 1: 5. P. wahlenbergii: the margins are plane or somewhat reflexed below; in P. drummondii more or less revolute below (at least in comal leaves) p. 518- 519 Crum & Anderson.

 

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Polytrichadelphus lyallii Mitt. = Polytrichum lyallii (Mitt.) Kindb.

 

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POLYTRICHASTRUM G. L. Smith, Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 21(3): 35. 1971  (Polytrichaceae)

 

Polytrichastrum alpinum (Hedwig) G. L. Smith, Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 21(3): 37. 1971

Polytrichum alpinum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 92, plate 19, fig. 2b. 1801

 

var. alpinum (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

Pogonatum alpinum (Hedw.) Roehl.

Pogonatum alpinum var. arcticum (Brid.) Brid.

Pogonatum alpinum var. brevifolium (R. Br.) Brid.

Pogonatum alpinum var. campanulatum (Hornsch.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G.

Pogonatum alpinum var. macounii (Kindb.) Card. & Thér.

Pogonatum alpinum var. simplex Schimp.

Pogonatum alpinum var. sylvaticum (Menz.) Lindb.

Pogonatum furcatum (Hornsch.) Brid.

Polytrichum brevifolium R. Br.

Polytrichum ferrugineum Brid.

Polytrichum furcatum Hornsch.

 

(as var. alpinum:)

Polytrichum alpinum var. arcticum (Bridel) Wahlenberg

Pogonatum alpinum var. brevifolium (R. Brown) Bridel (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

The var. alpinum not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); perhaps the following notes all pertain to var. septentrionale (Brid.) G. L. Smith, the only variety of P. alpinum noted for the state (FNA Vol. 27, 2007):

 

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, California, Colorado: Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan; widespread in eastern North America from Labrador to North Carolina. [as var. septentrionale] Washington, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Northwest Territory, California, Utah, Colorado; Quebec, Nova Scotia.] (As Pogonatum alpinum) Brooklyn Lake, Lake Marie, Albany County; Battle Lake, Carbon County; and Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (Porter, 1935). (As Pogonatum alpinum) “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. (As Polytrichastrum alpinum (Hedw.) G.L.Smith) Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994. [as var. septentrionale] Albany, Carbon cos., Yellowstone Natl. Pk., Porter, 1937. Crum & Anderson p. 1268, consider this variety “...a stunted alpine expression from which the var. brevifolium can scarcely be distinguished”). See var. brevifolium in Flowers.

 

ALBANY CO.: (As Pogonatum alpinum) La Plata Mines, Aug. 25, 1898, no. 5170; Aug. 28, no. 5233 (Nelson 1900); Medicine Bow Mts., 9,800 ft., R. Lichvar 1333 (RM); [as var. septentrionale] on the stony shore of an alpine lake, Telephone Mines, Nelson 7853 (RM) July 31, 1900 [papillose lamellae, see sub Polytrichum sexangulare]; (as var. septentrionale (Sw.) Brid.) ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., R. Lichvar 1346 (RM). CARBON CO.:(As Pogonatum alpinum) Battle LakeMt., Aug. 17, 1897, no. 4225 (Nelson 1900). [As var. septentrionale] BIG HORN CO., 10,400 feet. Fonken #994 (RM, BUF). PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, 3200 msm, W. A. Weber, B-44315 (COLO, RM);  [SNG, Beartooth Plateau, alpine snow melt area, small lake in vast depression, ca. 100 m N of Beartooth Scenic Byway, boggy shore crossed by rills, Carex spp. - Bryidae wetlands, wet tussocks, on clay soil, associated with Sciuro-hypnum glaciale [Kosovich-Anderson 3508 (MHA, MO, RM) N 44*58.510-515’, W 109*27.165-170’, alt. 10,500 ft (3200 M), 20 August 2008; . SUBLETTE CO.: 11,200 ft., H. Rolston, III 85098 (CSU); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake with Pohlia cruda (Hedw.) Lindb. Richard Andrus 7791b (BING). TETON CO.: Absaroka Range, 9650 ft., F.J. Hermann 25540 (RM).

 

On identifying this common species with a handlens: it is distinctive for its long red awn and for the leaf margins broadly and sharply folded inward over the lamellae. With a lens and when dry, the leaf edges present a smooth, shining edge rather like a spruce needle.

 

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Polytrichastrum alpinum (Hedw.) G. L. Smith

var. septentrionale (Bridel) G. L. Smith, Mem. N.Y. Bot. Gard. 21(3): 37. 1971

Polytrichum septentrionale Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1800(1): 285.1801      (Polytrichaceae)  unillo

 

Polytrichum septentrionale Brid.

Pogonatum alpinum var. septentrionale (Brid.) Brid.

Polytrichum alpinum var. septentrionale (Brid.) Lindb.

Polytrichum norwegicum Hedw.

 

Reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

[Polytrichastrum formosum (Hedwig) G. L. Smith, Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 21(3): 37. 1971 ]

Polytrichum formosum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 92, plate 19, fig. 1a. 1801

 

Polytrichum attenuatum Menzies. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA 2007). See note under Polytrichastrum longisetum (Brid.) G. L. Smith

 

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Polytrichastrum longisetum (Bridel) G. L. Smith, Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 21(3): 35. 1971

Polytrichum longisetum Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1800(1): 286.  1801          (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

Polytrichum formosum var. aurantiacum (Brid.) C. J. Hartm.

Polytrichum gracile Menzies

Polytrichum gracile var. anomalum (Milde) I. Hagen (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

 (Synonymy of Polytrichum longisetum Brid. from the earlier Wyoming checklist:) 

Catharinea dixonii Braith. in Dix.

Catharinella dixonii (Braith.) Kindb.

Polytrichum attenuatum var. aurantiacum (Brid.) Turn.

Polytrichum aurantiacum Hoppe ex Brid.

Polytrichum formosum var. gracile (Dicks.) Vent. & Bott.

Polytrichum gracile Dicks. in Menz.

 

Reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Note: Ireland (1982 p. 684) reported Polytrichum formosum Hedw. for Wyoming, with the synonym Polytrichum gracile var. anomalum (Milde) Hag.. The specimen on which this report is based may be Polytrichastrum longisetum.

 

(As Polytrichum longisetum) On soil from the lowlands to over 3300 m. British Columbia, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, California, Colorado, Arizona; Manitoba, Ontario, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois; Quebec, New England, and North Carolina.

 

(As Polytrichum gracile Dicks.) Sylvan Geysers, Yellowstone National Park (A. Nelson, [July 26] 6175), Porter, 1935. (As Polytrichum gracile Dicks.) Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. (As Polytrichum longisetum) Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994. PARK CO.: (As Polytrichum longisetum)  Beartooth Mts., 9700 ft., R.L. Hartman 18542 (RM).

 

SUBLETTE CO.: (As Polytrichum longisetum)Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 Terrace fen on Baldy Creek, 10,110 ft. elev. 42°58'N, 109°35'W. Richard Andrus 7856 (BING). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: (As Polytrichum longisetum) Sylvan Geysers, Aven & Elias Nelson, 6175 (RM); A. & E. Nelson, 6175 (RM).

 

When making sections of this moss, be careful to do it near midleaf, since the lamellae seem to be fewer in the upper and lower parts of the leaf, and one might be mislead into Atrichum or Oligotrichum (lamellae less than 20). Look at the number without sectioning by viewing the ventral surface of the midleaf.

 

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Polytrichastrum sexangulare (Bridel) G. L. Smith, Mem. New York Bot. Gard. 21(3): 37. 1971

Polytrichum sexangulare Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1800(1): 285. 1801

 var. sexangulare (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

(Synonymy from the earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Polytrichum crassisetum Lam. & DC.

Polytrichum norvegicum auct. mult. non Hedw.

Polytrichum sexangulare var. nivale Kindb. in Roell

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Polytrichum sexangulare) On soil in the mountains from about 1300 m to over 3300 m. British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; reported from Alaska and Greenland. Brooklyn Lake, Albany Co. (Elias Nelson 5232); Telephone Mines, Albany County (Aven Nelson 7853°); and Ten Sleep Lakes, Big Horn County (Goodding, 427), Porter, 1935. I found Nelson 7853 to have papillae on the lamellae and so to be Pogonatum alpinum var. septentrionale (Sw.) Brid.  Park Co.: Polytrichastrum sexangulare was reported growing with Polytrichum juniperinum, Brachythecium brandegeei and Sanionia nivalis (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

(As Polytrichum sexangulare) ALBANY CO.: La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5232 (RM) Aug. 28, 1898.

 

The species can be confused with Pogonatum alpinum var. septentrionalis, but for the papillose lamellae. The urns both appear to be small and round. The 5232 specimen showed little if any ridges in the urns - they were round (young?).

 

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POLYTRICHUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 88. 1801   (Polytrichaceae)

 

Polytrichum commune Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond.,  88. 1801

 

var. commune (Polytrichaceae)

Polytrichum commune var. uliginosum Wallroth

 

Polytrichum commune var. maximoviczii Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Sylvan Geysers, Norris, in Yellowstone National Park (A. Nelson, 6182 & 6144). Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, July 25, Norris no. 6144, (RM); T.C. Frye, July 7, 1934 (RM); T.C. Frye, July 6, 1934 (RM); Sylvan Geysers, July 26, no. 6182 (Nelson 1900). There are var. jensenii (Hag.) Moenk. in Warnst. and var. perigoniale (Michx.) Hampe in the 1990 checklist.

 

Specimen at RM: as P. jensenii Hagen. Aven & Elias Nelson 6131 YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - in great open beds on the shore of the lake (Beaver Lake) July 24, 1899. An annotation on the label reads: “discussed in Asa Gray Bulletin Vol. 8, p. 95 (1900). This specimen has large cuticular knobs on the terminal cells of the lamellae and teeth were not evident.”

 

Specimens of Polytrichum commune need to be reexamined to consider the variety perigoniale (Michx.) Hampe and P. jensenii I. Hagen. The Yellowstone quote above indicates Polytrichum jensenii, which, unlike P. commune, has entire or finely serrulate margins (not strongly toothed); P. commune has squarrose-recurved laminae when moist, but in P. jensenii they are essentially straight when moist (FNA 2007).

 

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Polytrichum commune var. perigoniale   (Michaux) Hampe, Linnaea 13: 44. 1839

Polytrichum perigoniale Michaux,  Fl. Bor.-Amer. 2: 293. 1803 (Polytrichaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

 Care must be taken with the map accompanying this variety in FNA 2007, as it does not correspond with the extensive distribution listed. The map indicates an Atlantic Coastal Plain distribution, but the variety also occurs in the plains states (Missouri, Oklahoma) and the Pacific Northwst in Washington State, British Columbia, the Yukon and Wyoming.

 

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Polytrichum commune var. maximoviczii Lindb. = Polytrichum commune Hedw. var. commune

 

Polytrichum formosum Hedw. = Polytrichastrum formosum (Hedw.) G. L. Smith

 

Polytrichum gracile var. anomalum (Milde) I. Hagen = Polytrichastrum longisetum (Brid.) G. L. Smith

 

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Polytrichum jensenii I. Hagen, Meddel. Grønland 15: 444. 1897 (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

Polytrichum commune var. jensenii (I. Hagen) Mönkemeyer

Polytrichum commune var. diminutum (I. Hagen) D. H. Long

Polytrichum commune var. yukonense (Card. & Thér.) Frye

Polytrichum yukonense Card. & Thér.  (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Polytrichum jensenii Hagen.) On the shore of Beaver Lake, Yellowstone National Park (A. Nelson, 6131). “This is the plant which is discussed at length by Holzinger (1900). It is apparently the only record for the United States,” Porter, 1935.

 

Polytrichum jensenii is a widely distributed plant of the high Arctic, with a sporadic disjunct occurrence southward ...” (G. L. Merrill in FNA Vol. 27, 2007 p. 137).

 

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Polytrichum juniperinum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 89, plate 18, figs. 6–10. 1801 (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

Polytrichum alpestre Hoppe (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Polytrichum juniperifolium Funck

Polytrichum juniperinum var. alpestre (Hoppe) Röhling (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Polytrichum juniperinum var. alpinum Schimp.

Polytrichum juniperinum var. waghornei Kindberg (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

On soil or soil over rock, from the lowlands to over 3300m. In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; widespread in the Middle West, and in eastern North America from Greenland and Labrador to North Carolina. Fairly common throughout the State; Albany, Crook, Sheridan, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994. Sublette Co. (Cooper & Andrus, 1994). Park Co. Polytrichum juniperinum was reported growing with Plagiomnium ellipticum, Sarmentypnum exannulatum, S. sarmentosum and Sanionia nivalis; in another site growing with Polytrichastrum sexangulare, Brachythecium brandegeei and Sanionia nivalis (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

ALBANY CO.: 9,200 ft., spruce fir zone, Porter, C.L. 9697 (RM). CARBON CO.: 9400-10,000 ft., ??? 4136 (RM, BUF). BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., ca. 1 air mi. SW of Tyrrell Ranger Station, sec 25 & 36. East-facing slope. Elev. 8800 ft., June 21, 1979, Ronald L. Hartman & Ann Odasz 9149 (BUF); Nelson 4868 (RH,BUF). PARK CO.: (Yellowstone Natl. Pk.) ??? 12779 (RM, BUF). SHERIDAN CO.: 8100', Nelson 4505 (RH, BUF). SUBLETTE CO.: 10,324 ft., Holmes Rolston III 85128 (CS). TETON CO.: 7,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25560 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: 8200 ft., D.L. Taylor 67-155 (RM). “La Plata Mines” E. Nelson 5231 (RM).

 

 

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Polytrichum juniperinum var. affine (Funck) Brid. = Polytrichum strictum Brid.

 

Polytrichum longisetum Brid. = Polytrichastrum longisetum (Brid.) G. L. Smith

 

Polytrichum lyallii (Mitt.) Kindb. = Meiotrichum lyallii (Mitt.) G. L. Smith

 

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Polytrichum piliferum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 90. 1801 (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, sterile (1528) (Roell 1893).

Albany, Carbon, Teton cos., Yellowstone Natl. Pk., Porter, 1935 & 1937. “Common in front of glaciers”, Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: (Willow Creek), Elias Nelson 2919 (RM); 10,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., F. J. Hermann 17695 (RM). BIGHORN CO.: 10,000-10,400 ft., Big Horn Mts., Odasz 737 (RM). CARBON CO.: summit Bridger Peak, 11,000 ft., C.L. Porter 1731 (RM). PARK CO.: 8600-9400 ft., 20702 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/2 mile southwest of Barnes Lake, 9760 ft. elev., 42°57'N, 109°36'W. Terrace fen. On N facing rock at edge of fen with Pohlia cruda. Richard Andrus 7817b (BING). TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25559 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: A. & E. Nelson, 6369 (RM); L. N. Goodding, 1983 (RM). “La Plata Mines,” A. Nelson, 1768 (RM).

 

Polytrichum sexangulare Floerke ex Brid. = Polytrichastrum sexangulare (Brid.) G. L. Smith

 

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Polytrichum strictum Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1800(1): 286. 1801 (Polytrichaceae) unillo

 

Polytrichum affine Funck (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Polytrichum juniperinum var. affine (Funck) Brid.

Polytrichum juniperinum var. gracilis Wahlenb. [sic]

Polytrichum juniperinum var. gracilius Wahlenb. [sic] (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Polytrichum juniperinum var. strictum (Brid.) Roehl.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, sterile (1527) (Roell 1893).

Usually in bogs, often with Sphagnum, from the lowlands to about 2400 m. British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon; New England. Woods Creek, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 2071); Mirror Lake, Albany County (Porter, 1276); Little Goose Creek, Sheridan County (Aven Nelson, 2363), Porter, 1935. Sublette Co., “occupies the tops of hummocks and other seasonally dry habitats,” Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: Wood's Creek, Aug. 11, 1896, Aven Nelson 2071 (RM). CROOK CO.: Sundance Mtn., A. Nelson 2180 (RM) (°use this one in checklist); Sundance Mtn., A. Nelson, July 3, 1896 (RM). PARK CO.: Beartooth Mts., R.L. Hartman 18541 (RM); Beartooth Plateau, 3250 msm, W. A. Weber B-44259 (COLO, RM). SHERIDAN CO.: Little Goose Creek, July 16, 1896, Aven Nelson 2363 (RM). SUBLETTE CO., In a peaty situation above the Lower Green River, a sterile specimen, but with characteristic white rhizoids, 7950 ft., Herman 25343 (RM).

 

Polytrichum strictum is widespread in the boreal regions of the Holarctic, and is one of the commonest low arctic representatives of the family (D. G. Long 1985), with survivals southward in relict bogs .... ... also in alpine situations in the ... mountains. ... Its characteristic habitat is on hummocks in Sphagnum bogs, in deep masses ...” (Merrill, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Pottia heimii (Hedw.) Hampe = Hennediella heimii (Hedw.) R. H. Zander

 

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PSEUDOCALLIERGON (Limpricht) Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 311. 1907 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum sect. Pseudocalliergon Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 3: 547. 1899 (as Pseudo-calliergon)

 

Pseudocalliergon angustifolium Hedenäs, Lindbergia 16: 85, fig. 1. 1992 (as augustifolium) (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Drepanocladus angustifolius (Hedenäs) Hedenäs & C. Rosborg

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Pseudocalliergon trifarium (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 311. 1907

Hypnum trifarium F. Weber & D. Mohr in F. Weber, Naturh. Reise Schweden, 177, plate 2, fig. 2. 1804  (Amblystegiaceae) unillo

 

Calliergon trifarium (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Kindberg

Drepanocladus trifarius (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Brotherus ex Paris

Scorpidium trifarium (F. Weber & D. Mohr) H. K. G. Paul (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Calliergon trifarium) Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus 1994.

 

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Pseudocalliergon turgescens (T. Jensen) Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 311. 1907

Hypnum turgescens T. Jensen, Vidensk. Meddel. Dansk Naturhist. Foren. Kjøbenhavn 1858: 63. 1858  (Amblystegiaceae) unillo

 

Calliergon turgescens (T. Jens.) Kindb.

Scorpidium turgescens (T. Jens.) Loeske

 

PARK CO. (As Scorpidium turgescens) alpine bogs, 3250msm, Weber, B-44257 (RM, COLO).

 

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PSEUDOLESKEA Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 147, plates 477, 478. 1852 (Leskeaceae)·

 

Pseudoleskea incurvata (Hedwig) Loeske, Hedwigia 50: 313. 1911

Leskea incurvata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 216, plate 53, figs. 8–14. 1801 (Leskeaceae)

 

Lescuraea incurvata (Hedwig) E. Lawton (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

The species and varieties are not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Pseudoleskea atrovirens) Yellowstone National Park, specimen numbers 1535-36a, and 1539 (Roell 1893); also as var. brachyclada, specimen number 1536; also as subspecies rigescens (Wils.) Lindberg (1538) (Roell 1893).

 

(As Pseudoleskea oligoclada Kindb.) Centennial, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 1724); Corral Ranger Station, Carbon Co. (Porter, 930), [Sheridan Co.], Porter, 1935. (As Lescuraea incurvata (Hedw.) Lawt. var. incurvata) Wyoming, Flowers 1973. (As Lescuraea incurvata (Hedw.) Lawt.) Teton Co., Spence, l985.

 

CARBON CO.: west slope of the Sierra Madre, in Battle Creek Canyon. 8,500 ft, streamside forest of Engelmann Spruce, moist rocks, Porter & Porter 9715 (RM) Aug. 18, 1964. SUBLETTE CO: , Shannon Pass, above Peak Lake, Wind River Mountains, Jim Bridger Wilderness, 43°08'N., 109°42'20” W. 3414 meters (11,200ft), Coll. Holmes Rolston III 85110 Aug. 23, 1985 (BUF, CS); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 17/viii/1989 Lake Sequa, 9940 ft. elev. 42°57'30”N, 109°34'W. Rock on shore. Richard Andrus 7881 (BING).

 

There is also a var. gigantea (Lawt.) Crum et al. and var. tenuiretis (Culm.) Crum et al. in 1990 checklist.

 

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Pseudoleskea patens (Lindberg) Kindberg, Canad. Rec. Sci. 6: 20. 1894

Lescuraea patens Lindberg, Meddeland. Soc. Fauna Fl. Fenn. 14: 75. 1888 (as Lesquereuxia)   (Leskeaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Lescuraea patens) Lawton. (As Lescuraea patens (Lindb.) Arn. & Jens.) Wyoming, Flowers 1973. (As Lescuraea patens) Ireland, 1982.

 

LINCOLN CO.: on basalt outcrop along Greys River, 1/2 mile N of North Twin Creek, alt. 6700 ft., Salt River Range, 36 miles SSE of Alpine Junction, F. J. Hermann 25599 (RM), Aug. 30, 1973 [dupl. det. E. Lawton]

 

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Pseudoleskea radicosa (Mitten) Macoun & Kindberg, Cat. Canad. Pl., Musci, 181. 1892

Hypnum radicosum Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 31. 1864  (Leskeaceae) unillo

 

Lescuraea radicosa (Mitten) Mönkemeyer (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (as var. radicosa) (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Leigh Lake, Teton Co. (Porter, 1177 & 1175), Porter, 1935. (As Lescuraea radicosa (Mitt.) Moenk.) Teton Co., Spence, 1985.

 

Var. radicosa: ALBANY CO.: vertical face of granite boulder on aspen slope, along N Fork of Little Laramie River, Sand Lake Rd., alt. 8500 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., ca. 3 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17742, Aug. 4, 1962 (RM). FREMONT CO.: thin soil on boulder on spruce-fir slope, Burroughs Creek Road, alt. 8400 ft., Absaroka Range, 14 miles N of Dubois, F. J. Hermann 25523 (RM), Aug. 28, 1973. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 19/viii/1989 42°57'30”, 109°36'W Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev. 1/4 mile south of Timico. On soil. Richard Andrus no.7897 (BING). TETON CO: on US26 & US287, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea -Pinus flexilis, Pinus contorta v. latifolia, xeric, some Artemisia, with Pohlia nutans, July 6, 1985 Eckel 94081602 (BUF), on wood.

 

Weber (1973) indicated this var. “seems to be intolerant of the drier conditions of the lower forested slopes and so far has been found only in the subalpine zone.” There is a var. compacta Best and a var. denudata (Kindb. in Macoun & Kindb.) Wijk & Marg., and var. pallida (Best) Crum et al. in the 1990 checklist.

 

var. compacta Best, Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 27: 231. 1900     unillo

 

Lescuraea radicosa var. compacta (Best) E. Lawton

Pseudoleskea pallida Best (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

(As Lescuraea radicosa var. compacta (Best) Lawt.) in Lawton.

 

var. denudata (Kindberg) Wijk & Margadant, Taxon 9: 191. 1960   unillo

Pseudoleskea sciuroides var. denudata Kindberg in J. Macoun and N. C. Kindberg, Cat. Canad. Pl., Musci, 181. 1892

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

var. pallida (Best) Crum, Steere & Anderson unillo

 

(As Lescuraea radicosa var. pallida (Best.) Lawt.) in Lawton.

 

The numerous [paraphyllia] of Pseudoleskea radicosa may first lead one to consider Helodium or Thuidium: the latter is strikingly papillose and both have branched paraphyllia, etc. etc.

 

This variety is not reported in FNA Vol. 28, 2014, but may be var. compacta, q.v.

 

Pseudoleskea stenophylla Renauld & Cardot, Bot. Centralbl. 44: 421. 1890  (Leskeaceae)

 

Lescuraea stenophylla (Renauld & Cardot) Kindberg

 

(As Pseudoleskea atrovirens subsp. P. rigescens (Wils.) Lindb. Yellowstone National Park, specimen number 1538 (Roell 1893). (As Lescuraea stenophylla (Ren. & Card.) Kindb.) Teton Co., Spence, l985 (citing Flowers specimen).

 

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Pseudoleskeella nervosa var. sibirica (H. Arnell) Lawton = Pseudoleskeella rupestris   (Berggren) Hedenäs & L. Soderström

 

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PSEUDOLESKEELLA Kindberg, Eur. N. Amer. Bryin., 47. 1897  (Leskeaceae)

 

Pseudoleskeella rupestris (Berggren) Hedenäs & L. Soderström, Lindbergia 17: 64. 1992

Leskea rupestris Berggren, Acta Univ. Lund. 3(7): 9, figs. 10–13. 1866             (Leskeaceae) unillo

 

Leskeella nervosa var. sibirica (Arnell) E. Lawton

Pseudoleskeella sibirica (Arnell) P. S. Wilson & D. H. Norris

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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Pseudoleskeella tectorum (Funck ex Bridel) Kindberg ex Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 229[I,3]: 997. 1907

Hypnum tectorum Funck ex Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 582. 1827      (Leskeaceae)

 

Pseudoleskea tectorum (Funck ex Bridel) Schimper (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(Synonymy from an earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Hypnum tectorum Funck ex Brid.

Leskea tectorum var. flagellifera Best

Leskea williamsii Best

Leskea williamsii var. flagellifera Best

Leskella tectorum (Brid.) Hag.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Leskea tectorum var. flagellifera) Rogers Canyon, Albany County (Porter, 1286); Yellowstone Falls, Yellowstone National Park (Porter, 1245), Porter 1935. (As Pseudoleskeella williamsii (Best) Crum, Steere & Anderson (As Leskeella williamsii Best) Near Fox Park, Albany Co. (Porter, 1267), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial, seep are (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23242 (NY); Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 8 air miles NE of Laramie city center, 7850-8000 ft. on thin soil over limestone boulder, N. G. Miller 10,247 (NYS) June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: limestone outcrop, Douglas fir slope, 1/2 mile E. of Horse Creek Campground, alt. 7800 ft., Absaroka Range, 11 miles N Dubois, Aug. 28, 1973, F. J. Hermann 25530 (with Tortella tortelloides, Gymnostomum aeruginosum) (WTU). NATRONA CO.: Hat Six Falls, S. E. of Casper, Elias Nelson 5036 (RM), Aug. 7, 1897, with Hymenostylium recurvirostrum. SHERIDAN CO.: on vertical rock face, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-020 (BUF, RM), June 16, 1992. WESTON CO.: PM Eckel 923686 (RM).

 

This moss, of the Thuidiaceae [now in the Leskeaceae, FNA Vol. 28, 2014], is distinct from those in the Leskeaceae by its frequently having no costa in smaller branch leaves. In the Leskeaceae, species appear to all have strong costae into the acumen, and Lindbergia brachyptera has a long acuminate apex, unlike Pseudoleskeella tectorum. Brachythecium collinum fruits readily around early July, whereas P. tectorum seldom does. The former species has a single costa and is regularly and distinctly serrate usually to the base: P. tectorum is generally entire except in young leaves where it may be somewhat serrulate in the apex. When P. tectorum is robust (non flagelliform), how to tell it from Homomallium mexicanum Card. of the southwest in sterile condition when the leaves are identical in areolation, variable costa, leaf-shape (longish acuminate), revolute at the base of the leaf is by LEAF SIZE: According to Crum & Anderson, H. mexicanum has leaves 0.8 to 1.3 mm and P. tectorum 0.45 - 0.6 mm: comfortably distinct. Furthermore, P. tectorum is characterized by an eagerness to develop reduced leaves, yielding branches flagelliform in appearance. When the largest of leaves of a collection is still less than 0.8 and there is an abundance of minute leaves on the stems, it is P. tectorum, in comparison with Homomallium. P. tectorum reminds one of the flagellate - attenuate branch ends of Anomodon attenuatus in the East. Anomodon is not an element of the western flora. Homomallium adnatum, the other species in that genus, is also an eastern taxon. H. mexicanum is to be looked for in Wyoming, but it would be north of its currently known range.

 

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PTERYGONEURUM Juratzka, Laubm.-Fl. Oesterr.-Ung., 95. 1882 (as Pterigoneurum),

name and orthography conserved (Pottiaceae)

 

Pterygoneurum ovatum (Hedwig) Dixon, Rev. Bryol. Lichénol. 6: 96. 1934

Gymnostomum ovatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 31, plate 2, figs. 1–3. 1801          (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Pottia cavifolia Ehrh. ex Fuernr.

Pottia pusilla Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming: Yukon, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado; Saskatchewan, North Dakota, Ontario, Quebec. (As Pterygoneurum cavifolium Jur.) On dry, sandy soil, Telephone Canyon, Albany Co. (Porter, 686), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn along WY 11, sandstone outcrops and chugwater redbeds with Artemesia, Buck, 23220 (NY) c. old fruit, June 7, 1993. CROOKE CO., PM Eckel 519686 (RM, BUF). HOT SPRINGS CO., PM Eckel 123686 (RM, BUF). LINCOLN CO: on US189 just N of border with Uinta Co., S of town of Kemerer, open sage prairie, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, on dirt polygons below shrubs. c.fr. July 4, 1985 mixed with P. subsessile, Eckel 94082205. NATRONA CO.: from soil on south bank of river shaded by slight overhang and tall grass in very dry land, sagebrush, bunchgrass habitat, Judy A. Hoy 315 (BUF) March 22, 1996. SWEETWATER CO: ca. 6,400,' on US (187)191, at 14-Mile Reservoir picnic area in Artemisia scrubland, moist shaded ravine over brook, with Hennediella heimii,

 Leptobryum pyriforme, Campylium chrysophyllum, July 5, l985 Eckel 312086 (BUF).

 

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Pterygoneurum subsessile (Bridel) Juratzka, Laubm.- Fl. Oesterr.-Ung., 96. 1882

Gymnostomum subsessile Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 1: 35. 1806     (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Gymnostomum acaule Floerke in Web. & Mohr

Pottia subsessile (Brid.) B.S.G.

 

British Columbia, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming; Yukon, Nevada, Utah, Arizona; Saskatchewan, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, Minnesota.

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie Plains, 2 air miles NE of Laramie, chugwater redbeds with Astragalus, Eriogonum, Pensstemon and grasses, Buck 23188 (NY) c.fr. June 7, 1993, old but intact, dehisced; open prairie, low grasses and forbs ca. 7300 ft., rim of breaks, among grasses, Reese 18164 (LAF) [his specimen no 18163B has Bryum argenteum]; Laramie Plains, 2 air miles NE of Laramie center, chugwater redbeds, rim of breaks, 7250-7300 ft., bare prairie soil between herbs, including Astragalus, Eriogonum, Penstemon, N. G. Miller 10, 251 (NYS) June 7, 1993, with Bryum argenteum.

 

GOSHEN CO.: 4350 ft., PM Eckel 871112 (BUF). HOT SPRINGS CO., PM Eckel 323686 (RM). LARAMIE CO.: PM Eckel 871113 (RM, BUF). LINCOLN CO: on US189 just N of border with Uinta Co., S of town of Kemerer, open sage prairie, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, on dirt polygons below shrubs, c.fr. July 4, 1985, mixed with P. ovatum, Eckel 94082206 (BUF). NIOBRARA CO.: 5000 ft., P.M.Eckel 871102 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: on US 191, 1.7 miles N of jct. with US 189. Artemisia tridentata, Sarcobatus, Shadscale grassland. On soil. July 5, 1985, P. M. Eckel 961254 (BUF, RM) + Tortula caninervis. SWEETWATER CO: on US (187)191, at 14 Mile Reservoir, picnic area, US Dept. Interior, dry slopes above pond, Sarcobatus, Artemisia tridentata scrub. With Tortula caninervis & T. mucronifolia. July 5, l985, Eckel 218186 (BUF, RH).

 

Awns up to twice the length of the leaf lamina: serrulate: capsules immersed, subhemispheric.

 

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PTERIGYNANDRUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 80, plates 16, 17, 18, figs. 1–5. 1801 (Pterigynandraceae)

 

Pterigynandrum filiforme Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 81. 1801     (Pterigynandraceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Yellowstone National Park: a specimen was noted by Roell (1893) for the park (numbers 1534, 1537a, and 1552).

 

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PTILIUM De Notaris, Comment. Soc. Crittog. Ital. 2: 283. 1867  (Hypnaceae)

 

Ptilium crista-castrensis (Hedwig) De Notaris, Comment. Soc. Crittog. Ital. 2: 283. 1867

Hypnum crista-castrensis Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 287, plate 76, figs. 1–4. 1801      (Hypnaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

PARK CO.: west of Bear Tooth Butte Crazy Creek Campground, along Crazy Creek, Aug. 22, 1953, E. Lawton, 2018 (WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Madison Junction, Aug. 18, 1953, E. Lawton, 1900 (WTU).

 

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PTYCHOSTOMUM Hornschuch, Syll. Pl. Nov. 1: 62. 1822 Spence (Bryaceae)

 

Ptychostomum arcticum (R. Brown) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 20. 2005

Pohlia arctica R. Brown, Chlor. Melvill., 38. 1823  (Bryaceae)

 

Bryum arcticum (R. Brown) Bruch & Schimper

Bryum bryoides (R. Brown) Ångstrom

Bryum purpurascens (R. Brown) Bruch & Schimper

Ptychostomum bryoides (R. Brown) J. R. Spence

Ptychostomum  purpurascens (R. Brown) J. R. Spence (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Ptychostomum bimum (Schreber) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 20. 2005

Mnium bimum Schreber, Bot. Zeitung (Regensburg) 1: 79. 1802;     (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Bryum bimum (Schreber) Turner

Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. bimum (Schreb. ex Brid.) Lilj.

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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[Ptychostomum cernuum (Hedwig) Hornschuch, Syll. Pl. Nov. 1: 64. 1822

Cynontodium cernuum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 58, plate 9. 1801        (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Bryum uliginosum (Bridel) Bruch & Schimper (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(Synonymy of Bryum uliginosum (Brid.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. in earlier Wyoming checklist:

Bryum cernuum (Sw.) Lindb.

Bryum conditum Williams

Bryum turbinatum var. pallens Drumm.

Cladodium uliginosum Brid.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

“Reported from Wyoming,” Lawton (1971). Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(As Bryum uliginosum) Flowers says p. 364 “The large curved capsule and large lax leaves make this moss easily recognizable.” Can have a big leaf, up to 5 mm!. Note that, like B. turbinatum, it has large more or less lax cells and the margins are not recurved (plane) but, unlike B. turbinatum which has no distinct border, B. uliginosum has cells “thin walled and lax, rather abruptly narrowly linear on the margins forming a strong border.” Note that Flowers indicates a 6 mm long capsule! B. uliginosum is also autoicous, B. turbinatum dioicous with a capsule to 3.5 mm and BROAD-pyriform, not curved or asymmetric (Andrews, p 226). B. uliginosum has a capsule “curved downward at the neck with a small mouth “often slightly oblique” (Flowers).]

 

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Ptychostomum creberrimum (Taylor) J. R. Spence & H. P. Ramsay, Phytologia 87: 23. 2005

Bryum creberrimum Taylor, London J. Bot. 5: 54. 1846  (Bryaceae)

 

Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum (Bruch & Schimper) Margadant (both FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum (B.S.G.) Marg. in earlier Wyoming checklist:

Bryum alaskanum Kindb.

Bryum bimum var. cuspidatum B.S.G.

Bryum creberrimum Tayl.

Bryum cuspidatum (B.S.G.) Schimp.

Bryum flagellosum Kindb.

Bryum hamicuspis Kindb.

Bryum intermedium (of American authors) sec. Crum et al. l973.

Bryum manitobae Kindb.

Bryum nano-caespiticium Kindb.

Bryum neomexicanum Card.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

[As Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum) [Note Bryum lonchocaulon C. Muell. is recognized in the new checklist, but Spence (1988) indicated that it is “an ecological variant of B. lisae with extremely long hairpoints.” p. 83. Bryum cirrhatum Hornsch. is in synonymy with B. lonchocaulon in the new list.]

 

(As Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum) In all states and provinces of the Pac. NW; Alask., Cal., Nev., Ariz; widespread in the Mid. West and in eastern N. Amer. (As Bryum intermedium Brid.) Laramie Mts. Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7274); Centennial Valley, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1263); Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. (As Bryum cirrhatum Hopp. et Hornsch.) Cummins, Homer Ranch, and Brooklyn Lake, all in Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1538°, in part, 6955, and 5235), Porter, 1937.

 

The specimen at RM was dioicous: Bryum caespiticium, q.v. “Bryum cirrhatum Hoppe & Hornsch. (B. lonchocaulon C. Muell.) is described as resembling B. creberrimum but with the excurrent costa longer and more strongly toothed and the seta and capsule longer. In Europe it is generally considered an alpine moss, but many specimens from the Pacific Northwest which have been determined as B. cirrhatum are from the lowlands and it is not clear whether they are distinct from B. creberrimum.” Lawton, p. 169.

 

(All as Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum) ALBANY CO.: Centennial Valley, Nelson 1263 (RM); Laramie Hills, Nelson 7274 (RM, US); (= B. lonchocaulon): long-awns; on the wet alkaline ditch banks, Homer's Field, exsiccat Plants of Wyoming, Aven Nelson 6955, det. Holzinger, c. fr. May 30, 1900 (RM). BIGHORN CO.: ca. 28.5 air miles east of Greyville, ca. 19.5 air miles NNE of Hyattville, 9200 ft., B. E. Nelson 3334 (BUF, RM), fruit operculate 9 July 1979; off Devil Canyon Rd. above Little Tepee Creek, on rotten logs, 8300 ft., Nelson 3658a (BUF), with Pohlia nutans, Leptobryum pyriforme and Distichium capillaceum; on disturbed soil just off US16 between TenSleep & Buffalo (near Sitting Bull Campsite). Pinus contorta v. latifolia being lumbered. Just N of Washakie Co. border. ca. 5000' c.fr. July 6, 1985, with Ceratodon purpureus, in fruit, Eckel 94092200 (BUF, RM). FREMONT CO.: 8400 ft., F. J. Hermann 25515 (RM). PARK CO.: 7400 ft., F. J. Hermann 20067 (RM). PARK CO.: 6000ft., Vukelich April 1, 1988 (BUF). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: (as Bryum torquescens) Druid Peak, July 12, 1899, Plants of Yellowstone National Park 5801 Aven Nelson & Elias Nelson, det. Holzinger, on the damp ground in the spruce woods, c.fr. (US, RM), growing amid fruiting Pohlia nutans [synoicous, rosulate specimens, lance-acuminate leaves with long awns, not ovate or obovate].

 

The Nelson specimen was synoicous, the cilia appendiculate, but the leaves were mostly ovate, ovate-lanceolate with incrassate cell walls 4, 5 and 6 to one in the upper leaves. NOTE: Nelson, 3658a is unusual in that the neck of the capsule is in some plants as long as the urn. It has low teeth on the lamina margins and hairpoints, as B. cirrhatum is described by Crum & Anderson (p. 556, Vol. 1) (note that B. pallescens is toothed). The habitat seems somewhat unusual for this widespread species (B. lisae var. cuspidatum) and perhaps more fieldwork would be of value. The synoicous condition is not always apparent, the Johnson Co. specimen: three stems had to be dissected before an antheridium could be located. My specimen from Big Horn is readily synoicous. Dissection of several capsules shows the cilia regularly well developed, as opposed to Ptychostomum inclinatum’s variability. Lawton indicates that descriptions of B. cirrhatum are plants “with the excurrent costa longer and more strongly toothed and the seta and capsule longer” (p. 169). In Europe this is considered alpine but there is no distinction in the US in elevation and is probably the same as (B. lisae var. cuspidatum). In the two Albany Co. specimens, the color looked bright red-green like caespiticium, the antheridia few but present; can caespiticium be occasionally synoicous? Note that the habit was elongate through the soil (doesn't look like caespiticium), NOT matted with rhizoids; straw yellow-green below, more yellowish, pale, red stems.

 

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Ptychostomum cyclophyllum (Schwägrichen) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 20. 2005

Mnium cyclophyllum Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 2(2,2): 160, plate 194 [bottom]. 1827    (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Bryum cyclophyllum (Schwägrichen) Bruch & Schimper

Bryum tortifolium Bridel (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum cyclophyllum (Schwaegr.) B.S.G.) in Lawton:

Bryum tortifolium Brid.

Bryum tortifolium Funck ex Brid. sec. Cr. et al. l973, non Index Muscorum which recognized B. cyclophyllum.

Mnium cyclophyllum Schwaegr.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

“The occurrence of P. cyclophyllum has probably declined in the United States, as the plants grow in wetlands and along streams in mid elevation regions, areas where human development is often concentrated” (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Bryum cyclophyllum) Wash., Alberta, Wyoming; Alask., Yuk., Ariz; Missouri. FREMONT CO.: 9300 ft., F. J. Hermann 25291 (RM). PARK CO.: tundra, 10000 ft., F. J. Hermann 20070 (RM & WTU). Both specimens pink. Tends to a bright red with age.

 

(As Bryum cyclophyllum)  In one instance it was found confused with B. gemmiparum which has not yet been found in Wyoming. The latter is without red pigmentation (Crum & Anderson), but most noteably is not or scarcely contorted when dry. As the epithet “tortifolium” suggests, plants of that species are strongly contorted when dry. Crum speculates that the epithet “gemmiparous” may “refer to a stunted kind of growth with leaves at stem tips crowded together in a budlike body (similar to perennating buds of some other “Brya” (p. 562), suggesting a habit quite unlike the unbudlike foliose habit of B. tortifolium. Although Flowers p. 382 indicates that the leaves of B. gemmiparum of the previous season are ferruginous, the specimen Hermann (20070) of B. tortifolium are all brick red. Need to verify the redness in gemmiparum, a species said to be devoid of that color. It differs from B. alpinum, miniatum and muehlenbeckii (small leaves, blunt apices, reddish color, etc.) by the latter all being scarcely contorted when dry, whereas B. tortifolium has B. tortiform leaves when dry!

 

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Ptychostomum inclinatum (Swartz ex Bridel) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 21. 2005

Pohlia inclinata Swartz ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(3): 144. 1803       (Bryaceae)

 

Bryum amblyodon Müller Hal.

Bryum stenotrichum Müller Hal.

Cladodium inclinatum (Swartz ex Bridel) Bridel (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum amblyodon in earlier Wyoming checklist:

Bryum acutiusculum C. Muell.

Bryum edwardsianum C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum froudei Kindb.

Bryum inclinatum (Brid.) Bland.

Bryum stenotrichum C. Muell. [1990 checklist]

Bryum stenotrichum C. Muell. sec. Crum et al, l973.

Bryum stenotrichum var. biddlecomiae (Aust.) Lawt. [1990 checklist]

Cladodium inclinatum (Brid.) Brid.

Pohlia inclinata Sw. ex Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Bryum inclinatum) Laramie Hills, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson 1928), Porter, 1935. (as cf. stenotrichum) “Common in front of glaciers”, Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

Weber (1973) indicated this species “occurs commonly in the alpine tundra, where it may replace B. pallescens on drier sites.” Note that Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum, which Flowers indicates is in Utah “our commonest species of Bryum,” p. 370, is not reported as growing in Colorado by Weber (1973).

 

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Ptychostomum knowltonii (Barnes) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 21. 2005

Bryum knowltonii Barnes, Bot. Gaz. 14: 44. 1889 (as knowltoni)     (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Ptychostomum lonchocaulon (Müller Hal.) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 21. 2005

Bryum lonchocaulon Müller Hal., Flora 58: 93. 1875 (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Spence (1988) indicated that [Bryum lonchocaulon] is “an ecological variant of B. lisae with extremely long hairpoints.” p. 83. Bryum cirrhatum Hornsch. is in synonymy with B. lonchocaulon in the new list (Anderson et al. 1990).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum cirratum (Hornsch.)  Lindb. - although this may be a different taxon than one in synonymy with P. lonchocaulon) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1506, 1509, 1510) (Roell 1893).

 

Ptychostomum lonchocaulon is very similar to P. creberrimum, differing in sexual condition [polyoicous, mixed synoicous and with male-only gametangia vs. synoicous] and its stronger non-yellowish limbidium” (Spence in FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Ptychostomum pallens (Swartz) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 21. 2005

Bryum pallens Swartz, Monthly Rev. 34: 538. 1801           (Bryaceae)

 

(As Bryum pallens (Brid.) Sw. in Roel. in earlier Wyoming checklist:

Bryum anoectangium C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum drepanocarpum Philib. in Card. & Thér.

Bryum heterogynum Philib. in Card. & Thér.

Bryum meesioides Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum subpurpurascens Kindb. in Macoun

Hypnum pallens (Sw.) Web. & Mohr

Pohlia pallens (Sw.) Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum pallens) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1505a) (Roell 1893). (As Bryum pallens) Brit. Colo. Wash., Oregon, Wyoming; Newfoundland, Quebec, NY.

 

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Ptychostomum pallescens (Schleicher ex Schwägrichen) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 21. 2005

Bryum pallescens Schleicher ex Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(2): 107, plate 75 [right]. 1816

(Bryaceae)

 

 (As Bryum pallescens Schleich. ex Schwägr. in previous Wyoming checklist)

Bryum microstegioides Kindb.

Bryum subrotundum Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum subrotundum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, parce sed fert. [sparing but fertile] (1511) (Roell 1893).

(As Bryum pallescens) In all states and prov. of the Pacific Northwest; Cal., Nev., Colo. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

(As Bryum pallescens) ALBANY CO.: Laramie Peak, in the shaded aspen groves, Nelson 7536 [det. by Holzinger as B. bimum Schreb.: printed label: Plants of Wyoming] (RM); on humus on bank of small stream Medicine Bow Mtns, Schriever, 9, 10,000 ft. (RM). BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns, off Devil Canyon Road above Little Tepee Creek, moist to wet meadow, 8300 ft., Nelson 3652, mature capsules July 13, 1979 (RM, BUF). CARBON CO.: peaty knoll on shore of Lake Marie, 10,000 ft., Snowy Range, Medicine Bow Mts., 13 miles E. of Ryan Park, Hermann 17146 [US], Aug. 19, 1961, good fruit [id'd as B. inclinatum], with Ceratodon purpureus; Ferris Mountains, Elias Nelson 4980 (US), c.fr. July 25, 1898 (id'd as B. cirratum), cladautoicous + free endostome. JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn Mtns., along middle fork Crazy Woman Creek, cf. fr. deoperculate, July 11, 1979, 8200 ft., Nelson 3584 (BUF, RM), with Leptobryum pyriforme and Ceratodon purpureus. SHERIDAN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., limestone outcrops and adjacent forest, 8000 ft. Hartman 10253 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: 10,325 ft., H. Rolston, III 85101 (CS). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: 1942 Witch Creek Fire Scar west of Flat Mn, 8000 ft., hillside, dry area, Taylor 67-159 (RM).

 

“Ptychostomum creberrimum is similar, but has smaller spores, synoicous sexual condition, and ovate segment perforations” (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

NOTE: This plant has complex sexuality, with male buds on separate branches. The stems are many-branched and felted with rhizoides, unlike B. lisae. The Albany specimen had thick-walled cells, but rather rhomboidal and elongate, not short (3: 1 or less). The fruiting stem may have an archegonium or two, and be apparently synoicous and then easy to mistake as B. lisae. The bulb-like habit of B. caespiticium with little branches should be looked at in comparison with this species. The Yellowstone specimen also has many branches, up to six with innovations on the branches. One of the side branches of the fruiting stem bore archegonia and no antheridia could be found on the stem examined. If you dissect a plant of this type and it has copious antheridia, it is probably this species, not B. lisae. The cell dimensions are indistinguishable from B. lisae, frequently being quite long. Note the toothed awn. Flowers has a good discussion of B. pallescens based on the habit: “stems abundantly branched with numerous short innovations ... very densely interwoven with rhizoids ... Well-developed, much branched typical specimens in very dense cushions are easily identified and it is usually easy to demonstrate the autoicous habit. Much care will need to be exercised in separating the shoots to make certain that some of the numerous branches are not broken off, or that closely adhering stems of a separate shoot are not taken to be part of only one plant.” p. 372. Has good illustration of the sexuality.

 

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Ptychostomum pendulum Hornschuch, Syll. Pl. Nov. 1: 64. 1822

Bryum algovicum Sendtner ex Müller Hal. (Bryaceae) unillo

 

(As Bryum algovicum Sendtn. ex C. Muell. of previous Wyoming Checklist:)

[var. algovicum; var. rutheanum (Warnst.) Crundw. in Anderson et al. 1990].

 

Bryum algovicum is “reserved for the autoicous form and B. algovicum var. rutheanum (Warnst.) Crund. should be used for the synoicous form. We find that the species is actually polygamous (usualy syoicous but sometimes also producing perigonial buds on the same plants)” Crum & Anderson p. 544, so they reject the varieties. But see the most recent checklist where both varieties are recognized. cf. discussion in Crum & Anderson l981. “The name B. angustirete Kindb. ex Macoun (Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 16: 94, 1889) has been rejected because the type could not be found either in Macoun's or Kindberg's herbarium, and such specimens as occur in those herbaria under that name are not B. algovicum,” p. 544, Vol. 1. Lawton's B. angustirete is synonymous with Bryum pendulum, as is Cr. & Anderson's B. algovicum. It is through Bryum pendulum that I identify Lawton's references to B. angustirete with B. algovicum.

 

Bryum pendulum (Hornsch.) Schimp.

Bryum roellii Philib.

Ptychostomum compactum Hornsch.

Ptychostomum pendulum Hornsch.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum pendulum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Upper Fall, 7000 ped. alt., c. fr. (1500, 1507) (Roell 1893).

(As Bryum algovicum) British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Northwest Terr. Cal., Nev., Colo.; Sask., Manit., S. Dakota, Iowa, Nebr., Minn., Mich., Ont., Indiana; Quebec to District of Columbia. (As Bryum angustirete Kindb. ex Macoun in Lawton).  (As Bryum angustirete Kindb.) Cokeville, Lincoln Co. (Aven Nelson, 4656), Porter, 1935. (As Bryum pendulum Schimp.) Albany, Carbon, Johnson, Sheridan, Sweetwater cos., Porter, 1935.

 

(As Bryum algovicum) ALBANY CO.: Centenial Valley, Aven Nelson 2654 (RM), Aug. 17, 1896, c. fr. (small mouth obvious here); also Sherman and Buford, wet granite swales, Macbride 2547 (RM) July 27, 1913. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., east facing slope, 8800 ft., Hartman & Odasz 9152, c. fr. not dehisced June 21, 1979 (BUF, RM). CARBON CO.: rocky hillside, Rawlins, on flat, wet ground, c. fr. Otto Degener 17,049 (US), July 13, 1942. JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn Mts., canyon along N fork Crazy Woman Creek; calcareous boulders in creek and wet cliffs at edge of creek, 6600 ft., Nelson 6837, c. f. half deoperculated Aug. 6, 1980 (BUF, RM), with Hymenostylium recurvirostrum. FREMONT CO.: in big spring about 4 miles eastward of Dubois, June 23, 1931, T. C. Frye (WTU). Steamboat Mountain, on a boggy flat, c.fr. June 9, 1900, Nelson 7045 printed label, Plants of Wyoming, det. by E. G. Britton & R. S. Williams (RM), synoicous + male buds on tips of branches, large spores, small mouths.

 

The Johnson Co. specimen had leaf cells shorter and thicker than B. lisae var. cuspidatum, but not as short as B. pseudotriquetrum, which in addition has decurrencies. The peristome is peculiar as described. SYNOICOUS. Weber: “The lamellae (divisions separated by horizontal walls) have several cross-walls which are irregularly widened; this is most easily seen from the ventral side.”

 

(As Bryum algovicum) Spence (1988) says the species “can be distinguished by its fused peristome, large spores, and small pendulous capsule with a small red mouth.” It occurs at low elevations and in dry regions. The Degener 17,049 specimen did have a small mouth, as Spence indicated, and with a nice red ring around it. The capsules appear to be as small as those of B. caespiticium, with which the Degener specimen had first been identified - but the stem was many branched and not rosulate (resembling B. pallescens in this regard) and not bulbous with long leaf apices as in caespiticium.

 

(As Bryum algovicum) The Nelson, 4656, specimen mentioned by Porter above seen at (US) had capsules that were too young, but the tufts were dense and green or yellow-green, as Crum & Anderson say (p. 542). The plant I examined was synoicous, note “innovations on fruiting plants often terminating in a perigonium” - which reminds me of pallescens. In the Nelson specimen the exostome segments appeared to be free of the endostome and curving. “The peristome is unique because of a chambered appearance, especially observable before complete soaking, caused by the adherence of lower half or more of the endostome to the exostome at its articulations. As seen with a lens, the species appears to lack an endostome, and the teeth tend to stand erect, rather than incurved as in mosses with inner and outer peristomes separate.” p. 542, Crum & Anderson.

 

This “chambering” has bedeviled me for the longest time. It is Flower's illustration that cleared up what I was to be seeing: in “normal” exostome teeth, there is an evenness of color up and down the tooth. In this species the color, orange at the base, is mottled like old dried up glue, appearing irregularly thickened. “Adherence” can only be guessed unless you can see the tooth in three dimensions.

 

Capsules are needed for identification (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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Ptychostomum pseudotriquetrum (Hedwig) J. R. Spence & H. P. Ramsay ex Holyoak & N. Pedersen, J. Bryol. 29: 120. 2007

Mnium pseudotriquetrum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 190. 1801  (Bryaceae)

 

Bryum pseudotriquetrum (Hedwig) P. Gaertner, B. Meyer & Scherbius  FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum pseudotriquetrum in earlier Wyoming checklist:)

[Note in 1990 checklist the var. bimum is subsumed under var.

pseudotriquetrum!]

Bryum bimum Schreb. ex Brid. [= Ptychostomum bimum (Schreber) J. R. Spence]

Bryum crassirameum Ren. & Card.

Bryum crassirameum Ren. & Card.

Bryum dimorphophyllum Card. & Thér.

Bryum euryloma Card. & Thér.

Bryum haematocarpum C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

[Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. bimum (Schreb. ex Brid.) Lilj. = Ptychostomum bimum (Schreber) J. R. Spence]

Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. crassirameum Ren. & Card.

Hypnum pseudotriquetrum (Hedw.) Web. & Mohr

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014) “Ptychostomum bimum is smaller, with much weaker decurrencies, and is synoicous” (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Bryum pseudotriquetrum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c.fr. (1515) (Roell 1893).  A form with short, obtuse leaves with the margins strongly revolute was also found at Yellowstone, as was var. gracilescens Schimper, sterile (1508) (Roell 1893).

 

(As Bryum pseudotriquetrum) In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest: Alask., Yuk., Cal., Nev., Colo.; widespread in the Middle West and from New England to N. Carolina. Sand Creek, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7002); Centennial, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1259); Medicine Bow Mts., Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7822 - see below), Porter, 1935. (As Bryum bimum Schreb.) Laramie Peak, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7536); Big Sandstone Creek, Carbon Co. (Porter, 914), Porter, 1935. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

(As Bryum pseudotriquetrum) (Dioicous - no antheridia seen): ALBANY CO.: wet rocks, Sheep Mountain (as B. alpinum L.): c. fr., Sept. 2, 1903, Goodding 2098, det. Holzinger (Plants of Wyoming, printed label) [RM, US]; In spruce woods, Medicine Bow Mts, July 30, 1900, Aven Nelson 7822 (RM) in exsiccat Plants of Wyoming. FREMONT CO: swampy border of Fiddler's Lake (Wyo. Rte.131), alt. 9300 ft., 22 miles SSW Hermann 25294, June 18, 1973 (RM). PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Hwy; W side Beartooth Pass, under late snow patch on steep slope N of switchback; rills & snowbeds, 3200 msm, Weber, Aug. 18, 1973 B-44305 (COLO, RM). (Var. bimum Schreb. ex Brid.) Lilj. = synoicous), SHERIDAN CO.: wet ground, A. Nelson 2416 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake. Richard Andrus 7798 (BING). var. bimum Schreb. ex Brid.) Lilj. = synoicous) [see note above] TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F. J. Hermann 25574 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Black Sand Basin, in specimen of Hygrohypnum bestii, Lawton 1871 [WTU] [s.l. no sexl. struct.]; Beartooth Plateau, Cook City to Red Lodge Highway; alpine bogs of east summit, east slope, head of Wyoming Creek, 3250 msm (as B. pallens), W. A. Weber B-44224 (RM, COLO -redet. Spence). [?]”Ferris Mountains, Carbon Co. (Elias Nelson, 4977). The determination is by Holzinger, and he has questioned its accuracy,” Porter, 1935.

 

(As Bryum pseudotriquetrum) This is supposed to be a West Coast species, with red capsules and leaves imbricate, i.e., barely contorted. [See note under B. pallens - the specimen of Nelson, 4977 at US was B. pallens.] One specimen of Bryum pseudotriquetrum s. lat. seen from RM had brown capsules and was synoicous, perhaps indicating that the dioicous-synoicous condition is variable.  [Specimen = Nelson, A. 7002 Plants of Wyoming exsiccat, Holzinger Det. Sand Creek, Albany Co., June 1, 1900, on the river banks under a cliff. The determination had a query. As Lawton says: p. 172 The stems are red. The branching is by innovation with slender delicate branches with small, distant leaves growing out of the rosulate stem apex, often surrounding the seta. The leaves are erect-spreading and twisted, contorted when dry. Slightly to conspicuously decurrent; margins recurved near to apex. Costa strong. The walls are rather thick and pitted. The conspicuous dense growth of reddish brown rhizoids extends nearly to the top of the stem. The decurrencies are conspicuous in sterile specimens with leaves distant on stems: the red and green are bright, dense, the stem surface comes off in long strips from the base of the costa (Park Co. spm.). It appears that the costa is percurrent, rather than long awned.

 

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Ptychostomum turbinatum (Hedwig) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 22. 2005

Mnium turbinatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 191. 1801       (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Bryum turbinatum (Hedwig) Turner

Mnium turbinatum Hedwig (both FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

 (Synonymy as Bryum turbinatum (Hedw.) Turn. in earlier Wyoming checklist:

Bryum anceps Card. & Thér.

Bryum denticulatum Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum extenuatum Ren. & Card.

Bryum haematophyllum Kindb. in Macoun

Hypnum turbinatum (Hedw.) Web. & Mohr.

Mnium turbinatum Hedw.

 

(As Bryum turbinatum) Brit. Colo., Mont., Wyoming; Yuk., Nev., Utah, Colo.; Sask; reported from Idaho, Cal., Ariz.

 

(As Bryum turbinatum) Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (collector unknown), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(All as Bryum turbinatum) ALBANY CO.: La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5176 (RM) Aug. 25, 1898, with Leptobryum pyriforme, Mnium marginatum (in packet of) and Distichium capillaceum. CARBON CO: Ferris Mts., Flora of Wyoming, Elias Nelson 4978, July 25, 1898 (NY); (as var. latifolium Schimp.) Ferris Mts., Elias Nelson 4978 with Cratoneuron filicinum, July 25, 1898 (US, RM). PARK CO.: Togwotee Pass, 9658 ft., Elva Lawton, 1725, Aug. 13, 1953, c. fr. (indehiscent) (NY). SUBLETTE CO.: 11,200 ft., alpine, moist area, H. Rolston III, 85098 (Colo. St. U.). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. Slough Creek, 1000 m, P. H. Hawkins, Aug. 22, 1922 (NY); P. H. Hawkins, 538, July 2-7, 1922, c. fr. (NY). CARBON CO.: [As Bryum crassirameum R. & S.”?”] Ferris Mountains, [Carbon Co.] Elias Nelson 4977 (US & RM) is beautiful material - the cilia are poorly developed, the leaves not contorted, the cells lax, and the plants dioicous (male plants in the specimen with buds at the stem tips). It fruited July 25, 1898. The margins were recurved, but not consistently so to the apex - mostly appearing not recurved. The dioicous condition was distinctive, as far as descriptions are concerned. The capsules were relatively short, the operculum not particularly small, and not zygomorphic - see discussion in Flowers who often found the capsules straight.

 

(As Bryum turbinatum) The distinction from B. uliginosum is apparently sexual (uliginosum is autoicous, small mouthed with a longer, long necked capsule). Also in B. pallens, according to Lawton, the cilia are appendiculate, in B. uliginosum they are rudimentary - in this specimen the cilia were variously developed and appendiculate. I originally called this B. pallens, but according to Spence, the leaves in that species are narrowly ovate: these are broadly ovate-lanceolate. To separate it from B. pseudotriquetrum, the leaf cells were large as in measurements described below, and the capsules were short and fat. There may be sterile B. pseudotriquetrum in which the B. turbinatum was growing. See comparison with B. uliginosum below. The Nelson 4978 specimen had tiny male plants, that is, the antheridia were found with some effort. The plants were DIOICOUS. This specimen was striking by the broad pyriform capsules. The leaves when dry were NOT contorted, but erect and undulate, with leaves a DULL yellow-green. The plant is striking by its erect leaf margins (not recurved) and the lax to firm-lax leaf cells. The stem was not rosulate. Note, however, the (to me) distinct leaf border which in older leaves is BISTRATOSE in parts in OLDER leaves - this differs from all descriptions of this taxon (indistinct and unistratose) but SPENCE's. I found the peristome teeth yellow-brown and not very distinctive. B. schleicheri is said to be of the Pacific coast and coast ranges, with leaves that are SHINY and erect. Since this specimen (Nelson 4978) is clearly in the interior I have concurred with the designation B. turbinatum.

 

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Ptychostomum weigelii (Sprengel) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 87: 22. 2005

Bryum weigelii Sprengel, Mant. Prim. Fl. Hal., 55. 1807 (Bryaceae)

 

 (As Bryum weigelii Spreng. in Biehler in earlier checklist)

Bryum duvalii Voit in Sturm

Bryum leucobasis Kindb.

Mnium duvalii (Voit) Schwaegr.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum weigelii) Brit. Colo., Wash., Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Alaska, Cal., Utah. Colo.; Mich., Ont.; Quebec, New Berun, Nova Scot., New Eng. (As Bryum duvalii Voit. in Sturm) Laramie Peak, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7553), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(As Bryum weigelii) CARBON CO.: Medicine Bow Mountains, 8600 ft., F. J. Hermann 26717 (RM). Laramie Peak, shaded stream banks, Nelson 7553, Plants of Wyoming 7553, sterile.

 

(As Bryum weigelii) NOTE: leaves serrulate at apex in Pohlia wahlenbergii, in Bryum weigelii, margins are entire. Both have leaves distant on the stem (see Pohlia wahlenbergii). This species may look strikingly like a Mnium in etiolated forms of wet habitats. The stems are long, tangled and reclining to matted in appearance like some Mnia. It is separated from species in that genus by the toothless margins and the long decurrencies. As far as I know, there are no toothless Mnia coupled with these long decurrencies. The apiculate apex of B. weigelii, in the upper leaves, is also diagnostic.

 

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PYLAISIA Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 87, plate 455. 1851 (as Pylaisaea), name and orthography conserved (Hypnaceae)

Pylaisiella Kindberg ex Grout

 

Pylaisia polyantha (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 88. 1851 (as Pylaisaea)

Leskea polyantha Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 229. 1801 (Hypnaceae) unillo

 

Leskea polyantha Hedw.

Isothecium polyanthum (Hedwig) Spruce

Pterogonium polyanthos (Hedwig) Muhlenberg

Pylaisia cyrtophylla Kindberg

Pylaisia. denticulata Schimper ex Sullivant

Pylaisia filari-acuminata Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Pylaisia. jamesii Sullivant & Lesquereux

Pylaisia. ontariensis Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Pylaisia. polyantha var. jamesii (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Rau & Hervey

Pylaisia. polyantha var. subdenticulata (Schimper) Rau & Hervey

Pylaisia. pseudoplatygyrium Kindberg; P ylaisia. subdenticulata Schimper

Pylaisia. suttonii Jennings

Pylaisiella polyantha (Hedwig) Grout

Pylaisiella subdenticulata (Schimper) Grout

Stereodon polyanthos (Hedwig) Mitten

Stereodon subdenticulatus (Schimper) Mitten (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Not yet listed for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Pylaisiella polyantha var. pseudoplatygyria (Kindb.) Grout. Hawk's Ranch, Colorado- Wyoming State line, Albany County (L.O. Williams, 100), Porter, 1935. A sterile and unidentifiable specimen of Pylaisiella (as Pylaisia) was collected in Yellowstone National Park by Roell (1893), specimen number 1533.

 

Pylaisiella polyantha (Hedw.) Grout = Pylaisiella polyantha (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper

 

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RACOMITRIUM Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 4: 78. 1818   (Grimmiaceae)

Grimmia sect. Racomitrium (Bridel) Müller Hal.; Racomitrium Bridel sect. Lanuginosa (Kindberg)

Noguchi; Rhacomitrium Lorentz, orthographic variant; Trichostomum sect. Racomitrium (Bridel)

Duby

 

Racomitrium canescens (Hedw.) Brid. = Niphotrichum canescens (Hedw.) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

Racomitrium canescens (Hedw.) Brid. var. ericoides (Brid.) Hampe = Niphotrichum ericoides (Brid.) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

Racomitrium fasciculare (Hedw.) Brid. = Codriophorus fascicularis (Hedw.) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

Racomitrium heterostichum var. macounii (Kindb. in Macoun) G. Jones in Grout = Bucklandiella macounii (Kindb. in Macoun) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

Racomitrium heterostichum var. sudeticum (Funck) Bauer = Racomitrium sudeticum (Funck) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. = Bucklandiella sudetica (Funck) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

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[Racomitrium lanuginosum (Hedwig) Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 4: 79. 1818

Trichostomum lanuginosum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 107. 1801 (Grimmiaceae)

 

 Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) where the species is reported from regions north of the Wyoming area.

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1473, 1474), Lower Geyser (1475) (Roell 1893).  Crum & Anderson, 1981]

 

Racomitrium sudeticum (Funck) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. = Bucklandiella sudetica (Funck) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

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RHIZOMNIUM (Mitten ex Brotherus) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 142. 1968  (Mniaceae)

Rhizomnium

Mnium sect. Rhizomnium Mitten ex Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 219[I,3]: 612. 1904

 

In Park Co. Elodium blandowii, forms a rich bryophyte community combined with Aulacomnium palustre, Climacium dendroides, Hylocomium splendens, Helodium blandowii, Rhizomnium spp.,  Marchantia alpestris, [Thuidium recognitum, q.v.] and others “ (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

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Rhizomnium andrewsianum (Steere) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 143. 1968

Mnium andrewsianum Steere, Bryologist 61: 175, figs. 1–12. 1958    (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming; its habitat and distribution are “Wet areas (depressions) in tundra; low elevations; Greenland; Alta., Nfld. and Labr., N.W.T., Nunavut, Yukon; Alaska; Europe; Asia” (McIntosh & Newmaster, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Note that this species is not recorded for Colorado by Weber and Wittmann [Bryophytes of Colorado, 2007, Pilgrims Process, Inc.].

 

PARK CO.; 2900 msm, Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, W. A. Weber B-44267, Aug. 19, 1973 (RM, COLO).

 

Although the specimen was sterile the leaf dimensions correspond with the description in Lawton (1971), the costa was decidedly below the apex of the leaf, more than in M. pseudopunctatum, and the leaves were more evidently crisped, whereas in M. pseudopunctatum they lie flat and are crisped more around the edges. The specimen from Park Co. was so crisped that the plants looked small in striking contrast to typical broadly expanded M. pseudopunctatum. The subalpine zone station also approximates the habitat noted for M. andrewsianum.

 

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Rhizomnium magnifolium (Horikawa) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 10: 14. 1973

Mnium magnifolium Horikawa, J. Jap. Bot. 11: 503, figs. 4, 5. 1935  (Mniaceae)

 

Mnium punctatum var. elatum Schimp.

Rhizomnium magnifolium (Horik.) T. Kop.,

Rhizomnium perssonii T. Kop.,

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Rhizomnium perssonii Koponen) Lawton. Albany County, Carbon County, and Teton County, Porter, 1935. (As Rhizomnium magnifolium (Horik.) T. Kop.) Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.; D. L. Sturges #247, (RM); 10,600 ft. R. Lichvar 1331 (RM); Medicine Bow Mountains, 10,000 Ft., F.J. Hermann 17697 (RM). BIGHORN CO. T50N, R 86 W, Sec. 4; 10,000-10,400 ft. Odasz no. 743 (RM). PARK CO.; 7500, F.J. Hermann 20058 (RM). TETON CO.: Teton Range, 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25580 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: T.C. Frye, July 7, 1934 (RM).

 

In the Odasz no. 743 specimen, the costae ended well below the apex, mostly forked, but with several leaves percurrent or subpercurrent. The laminal cells were weakly (not strongly) collenchymatous, and also weakly (not strongly) pitted. The marginal border was 2-stratose (which R. pseudopunctatum never is (McIntosh & Newmaster FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Rhizomnium punctatum is described by these authors as having an apiculus or short mucro. The illustration of R. punctatum by Crum and Anderston (1981) shows a strong apical border of several rows of cells, even in small forms. The apex of Mnium punctatum var. elatum (=R. magnifolium) shows a single row of elongate marginal cells at the apex which seems in keeping with the abbreviated costa. The apex is also often notched (emarginate) in leaves with subpercurrent costae.

 

Note should be made that the laminal cells near the leaf margins are very much smaller than those toward the costa, many isodiametric (not elongate-rectangular).

 

The leaf bases are broadly decurrent or sometimes the leaf margins end nearly against or flush with the base of the costa.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: MniaRhizomniumMagnifolium_Web

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Rhizomnium pseudopunctatum (Bruch & Schimper) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 143. 1968

Mnium pseudopunctatum Bruch & Schimper, London J. Bot. 2: 669. 1843 (Mniaceae)

 

Mnium subglobosum B.S.G.

Rhizomnium pseudopunctatum (Bruch & Schimp.) T. Kop.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

ALBANY CO.: Centennial Hills, A. Nelson 2702, Aug. 20, 1896 (RM); Centennial Valley, A. Nelson 1744, Aug. 19, 1895 (RM). CARBON CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., 9000 ft., moss-covered, peaty bank of Trail Creek, W of Sand Lake Rd., 4 1/2 miles SW of Morgan, F.J. Hermann 17799 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake Richard Andrus 7797 (BING).

 

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Rhizomnium punctatum (Hedwig) T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 5: 143. 1968

Mnium punctatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 193. 1801  (Mniaceae) unillo

 

Mnium punctatum Hedwig var. punctatum

Rhizomnium punctatum (Hedwig) T. J. Koponen subsp. chlorophyllosum (Kindberg) T. J. Koponen

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol.28, 2014).

 

[Carbon, Teton cos.], Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. (As Rhizomnium punctatum (Hedw.) T. Kop.) Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

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RHYTIDIADELPHUS (Limpricht) Warnstorf, Krypt.-Fl. Brandenburg 2: 917. 1906  (Hylocomiaceae)

Hylocomium subg. Rhytidiadelphus Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 3: 590. 1901; Hylocomiadelphus Ochyra & Stebel

 

Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus (Hedwig) Warnstorf, Krypt.-Fl. Brandenburg 2: 920. 1906

Hypnum triquetrum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 256. 1801  (Hylocomiaceae)

 

Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus var. beringianus (Cardot & Thériot) Grout (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Yellowstone National Park (Smiley, B. F. Harrison, and Porter), Porter, 1935.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: F. Bartley & L. Pontious, Aug. 21, 1938 (RM); B.F. Harris 219 (RM); T.C. Frye July 6, 1934 (RM).

 

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RHYTIDIUM (Sullivant) Kindberg, Bih. Kongl. Svenska Vetensk.-Akad. Handl. 6(19): 8. 1882 (Rhytidiaceae)

Hypnum sect. Rhytidium Sullivant in A. Gray, Manual ed. 2, 675. 1856

 

Rhytidium rugosum (Hedwig) Kindberg, Bih. Kongl. Svenska Vetensk.-Akad. Handl. 7(9): 15. 1883

Hypnum rugosum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 293. 1801   (Rhytidiaceae)

 

Hylocomium rugosum (Hedw.) De Not.

 

Wyoming, “Though widespread, Rhytidium rugosum is infrequent, presumably because of a preference for exposed calcareous or mafic bedrock in a cool habitat” (Rohrer, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Hawk's Ranch, Colorado-Wyoming State line, Albany County (Porter, 1445), Porter, 1935.

 

PARK CO.: road from Bear Tooth Lodge to Red Lodge, near summit at 10,940 ft., Lawton, 1981, Aug. 21, 1953 (WTU).

 

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Roellia roellii (Broth. in Roell) Andrews in Crum = Roellobryon roellii (Brotherus) Ochyra

 

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ROELLOBRYON Ochyra, Polish Bot. J. 56: 119. 2011 · [Invalid genus name Roellia and Greek bryon, moss, to coin a valid name for the genus]  (Roellobryaceae)

Roellia Kindberg, Gen. Eur. N.-Amer. Bryin., 37. 1897, not Roella Linnaeus 1753 [Campanulaceae]

 

Roellobryon roellii (Brotherus) Ochyra, Polish Bot. J. 56: 119. 2011

Mnium roellii Brotherus, Bot. Centralbl. 44: 420. 1890  (Roellobryaceae)

 

Bryum sandbergii Holzinger

Mnium lucidum (E. Britton) Brotherus

Roellia lucida Kindberg

Roellia roellii A. L. Andrews ex H. A. Crum

Roellia simplex Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(Synonymy of Roellia roellii in earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Bryum lucidum Britt.

Bryum sandbergii Holz.

Bryum simplex Kindb. in Macoun

Mnium lucidum (Britt.) Broth.

Mnium roellii Broth. in Roell

Mnium simplex (Kindb.) Kindb.

Roellia roellii (Broth.) Andrews in Crum

Roellia simplex (Kindb.) Kindb.

 

Wyoming; “Roellobryon roellii is rare in Alaska, Nevada, and Utah, and is most common in areas south of the Pleistocene ice-sheets in western North America.  Coastal Alaskan-northern British Columbia populations probably survived glaciation in refugia.  The species has been found near sea level in coastal Alaska but generally occurs at 500--3200 m.” (Spence, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific North West.; Cal. Colo. (As Bryum lucidum E. G. Britton) Carbon, Teton cos., Porter, 1937. (As Roellia roellii) Teton Co., Spence, 1985. Vitt (1993, gives the same Wyoming distribution with no citations of specimens.

 

TETON CO.: Teton National Park, Cascade Trail, E. Lawton, Aug. 14, 1953, 1749, c.fr. (WTU); Cascade Canyon, Marion Ownbey, Aug. 19, 1935 (WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: on ground in woods, Lower Falls of Yellowstone River, Bartley & Pontious 4 (RM).

 

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ROSULABRYUM J. R. Spence, Bryologist 99: 222. 1996  (Bryaceae)

 

[Rosulabryum canariense (Bridel) Ochyra, Biodivers. Poland 3: 162. 2003

Bryum canariense Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 3: 29. 1817  (Bryaceae) Excluded.

 

Not reported from Wyoming; “Moist soil banks, soil over rock; low to high elevations (0--1600 m); B.C.; Calif., Oreg., Wash. (Spence, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

 [Bryum canariense Brid., Musc. Rec. Suppl. 3: 29. 1817. neither this Bryum or the following synonyms occur in the treatment of the Bryaceae by Spence (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)]

 

(Synonymy of Bryum canariense from the earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Bryum provinciale Philib. in Schimp.

Bryum hendersonii Ren. & Card.

 

British Columbia, Washington, Oregon; California. (As Bryum provinciale Philib.) Medicine Bow Mts., Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7814), Porter, 1935.

 

Examination of this collection at RM and US shows this [Wyoming specimen] is Bryum caespiticium Hedw. The geographic anomaly is striking, but more particularly the Nelson specimen had long awns in fertile stems, was not rosulate in stem leaf arrangement, and it had strongly developed cilia that were clearly appendiculate. Sterile stems of this species approximate B. canariense in their short, reflexed mucros and the numerous tiny innovative branches that may serve as propagules. No tubers were seen. The propagulaceous tiny stems (not often described for caespiticium) seem to have confused early workers in the western flora with bulbils (cf. B. dichotomum). Leaves “large with short recurved hairpoint, often in 2 or more interrupted comal tufts along stem; leaf border weak or lacking at apex; tubers brown” (Spence, 1988). Spence also says “predominantly coastal Mediterranean climates: British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California. “Bryum canariense is dioicous and lacks tubers, while B. provinciale is autoicous or synoicous and produces rhizoidal tubers. Some gatherings from western North America are dioicous and produce tubers, hence I prefer to regard B. provinciale as a variety of B. canariense.” DIOICOUS. Teeth brownish yellow, reddish orange at the base, hyaline at the apex; endostome nearly as long as the teeth. Segments open on the keel, cilia usually three, appendiculate. Ochi in Mexico says nodulose to short-appendiculate cilia [in B. caespiticium they are “well developed, long-appendiculate”]. B. canariense: “with short axillary branches becoming detached and acting as asexual reproductive structures, the BRANCHES JULACEOUS (imbricate wet or dry). Costa usually ending before the apex. Leaves crowded in rosulate tufts, at least on FERTILE stems. THESE plants from Wyoming have the cute recurved mucros only in sterile stems: fertile ones are long awned.]

 

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Rosulabryum capillare (Hedwig) J. R. Spence, Bryologist 99: 223. 1996

Bryum capillare Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 182. 1801   (Bryaceae) unillo

 

(Synonymy from previous Wyoming checklist as Bryum capillare)

Bryum capillare ssp. heteroneuron C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun (in Lawton) sec. Crum & And.

Bryum oreganum Sull.

Mielichhoferia cuspidifera Kindb. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Bryum capillare) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1517 f. sterilis, ad var. carinthiacum vergens (Roell 1893).   (All as Bryum capillare)  Brit. Colo., Wash., Ore., Ida., Mont., Wyoming; Cal. Nev., Ariz; widspread in the Middle West and in eastern N. Amer from Quebec to Fla. (As Bryum oreganum Sulliv.) Centennial, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 2707, in part & 2708); Dome Lake, Sheridan Co. (Aven Nelson, 8826), Porter, 1935. (As Bryum capillare) Antelope Basin, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7484); Loomis Creek, Natrona Co. (Goodding, 180), Porter, 1935. (As Bryum capillare ssp. herpetoneuron) Albany, Natrona cos., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994. (As Bryum torquescens) Druid Peak (Aven Nelson, 5801); and Norris (Smiley), both in Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. See discussion in Crum & Anderson p. 574. The 5801 specimen of Nelson at Druid Peak I have redetermined as Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum (q.v.).

 

(All as Bryum capillare)  ALBANY CO.: Antelope Basin, Damp woods, July 9, 1900, deoperculate, Nelson 7484 (Holzinger exsiccat) (RM & US). NATRONA CO.: Big Horn Mts., First Water Creek, dry creek bed and road crossing, 7700 ft., Hartman 10452, c.fr. operculate Aug. 1, 1979, with Funaria hygrometrica (BUF, RM). NATRONA CO.: Moist places under a ledge, Loomis Creek, July 3, 1901, Leslie N. Goodding 180, Det. Holzinger, Plants of Wyoming 180, (US) c.fr. operculate. SHERIDAN CO.: Dome Lake, July 16, 1896, c. fr., Aven Nelson 8826 (RM), with Drepanocladus uncinatus & Philonotis fontana var. fontana. TETON CO.: Lower Slide Lake, growing along a intermittant stream on dark sandy soil, common, Lichvar Non. 115, 7,000 ft., c. deoperculate fruit (old), May 25, 1977 (RM). WASHAKIE CO.: Big Horn Mtns., along red fork Powder River, 7300 ft., river bank, Nelson 3556, operculated July 11, 1979 (BUF, RM).

 

(All as Bryum capillare)  NOTE: Most descriptions of this species emphasize the sterile plants. Characteristics of the fruiting stems are leaves that are much like Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum, only very thin (lax) walled. The Washakie Co. specimen was synoicous, the antheridia relatively large (larger than what I've been calling Bryum lisae var cusp.). The plants can form polsters or cushions: B. lisae doesn’t, that I know of. The sterile stems with percurrent but generally not long-excurrent costae are more diagnostic than the fruiting stems. Collections with a lot of fertile stems have long awns (Teton Co.). The Washakie Co. specimen had two setae coming from one archegonium, plus antheridia! The Teton specimen also was synoicous with strikingly large archegonia.

 

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[Rosulabryum flaccidum (Bridel) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 89: 114. 2007

Bryum flaccidum Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 667[“665”]. 1826 (Bryaceae)

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming although noted in Colorado and Nevado and so to be expected (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

“In North America there has been significant confusion over the identity of the small species that produce filiform gemmae in the leaf axils.  H. Syed (1973) named the common widespread species with short, rosulate innovations Rosulabryum flaccidum, and described a new species, R. laevifilum, for specimens with smooth gemmae.  However, these two species completely intergrade, and the name R. flaccidum was incorrectly applied.  The correct name is thus R. laevifilum for what has passed as R. flaccidum in North America.  True R. flaccidum is a very different species related to R. pseudocapillare, with a type from Hispaniola” (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).]

 

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Rosulabryum laevifilum (Syed) Ochyra, Biodivers. Poland 3: 162. 2003

Bryum laevifilum Syed, J. Bryol. 7: 293, figs. 13, 14. 1973   (Bryaceae) unillo

 

Bryum laevifilum Syed

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

“Rosulabryum laevifilum is the [North American] flora’s most widespread species of the genus with filiform gemmae, and is the most common corticolous species.  The sporophytes are rare.  Specimens on bark are often very small compared with those on other substrates.  See also the discussion under R. flaccidum” (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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[Rosulabryum torquescens (Bruch ex De Notaris) J. R. Spence, Bryologist 99: 223. 1996

Bryum torquescens Bruch ex De Notaris, Syllab. Musc., 163. 1838  (Bryaceae)

 

Bryum capillare subsp. torquescens (Bruch ex De Notaris) Kindberg

 

Not yet known for Wyoming, but to be looked for. Reported for Nevada (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)]

 

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SAELANIA Lindberg, Utkast Eur. Bladmoss., 35. 1878 (Ditrichaceae)

 

Saelania glaucescens Hedwig) Brotherus in J. O. Bomansson and V. F. Brotherus, Herb. Mus. Fenn., Musci, 53. 1894

Trichostomum glaucescens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 112. 1801 (Ditrichaceae)

 

Ditrichum glaucescens (Hedw.) Hampe

Saelania caesia (P. Beauv.) Lindb.

 

 

Not reported for Wyoming ((FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Alberta, Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon, Colorado, Arizona; Manitoba, Minnesota, Iowa; Ontario, Greenland and Nova Scotia south to New Jersey.

 

PARK CO.: west of Bear Tooth Butte, Crazy Creek campground, E. Lawton, Aug. 22, 1953, 2020, old fruit (WTU).

 

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SANIONIA Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 309. 1907  (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Sanionia georgico-uncinata (C. Muller) R. Ochyra & L. Hedenäs in R. Ochyra has been excluded from North America (Hedenäs 2011); the name to be used for North American species formerly under this name is rather Sanionia nivalis L. Hedenäs, q.v.

 

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Sanionia nivalis Hedenäs, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 26: 411, figs. 10–12. 1989 (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

PARK CO.: SNF, Beartooth Plateau; alpine Caltha leptosepala + Sedum sp. + Carex spp. - Bryidae fen in small depression beside the head of National Forest Trail #623, 100-150 m E of Beartooth Scenic Byway, on wet peaty soil, locally abundant, forms pure mats and assoc. with Plagiomnium ellipticum, Polytrichum juniperinum, Sarmentypnum exannulatum, S. sarmentosum, S+, T58N R104W S28, 44*58.770-775’N, 109*25.530-540’ W, elev. ca. 10,700 ft (3260 m), 19 Aug 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 3430 (COLO, MO, S).  PARK CO.: unnamed tributary of Frozen Lake, seepage slope, on soaked peaty soil and wet clay along streamlets, snow melt area, in pure mats and assoc.: Polytrichastrum sexangulare, Polytrichum juniperinum, and Brachythecium brandegeei, S+, T58N R104-105W S31&36, 44*58.050-060’N, 109*28.870-890’ W, elev. ca. 10,500 ft (3200 m), 14 Aug 2088, Kosovich-Anderson 2626A. Other Park Co. specimens are cited also without herbarium designation; see citations in Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011.

 

Hedenäs (2011) reported that Sanionia georgico-uncinata and S. nivalis are morphologically indistinguishable and are separated by molecular information, the former belongs to the Southern Hemisphere, the latter to the Northern.

 

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Sanionia uncinata (Hedwig) Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 309. 1907   (Amblystegiaceae) unillo

Hypnum uncinatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 289. 1801

 

Drepanocladus uncinatus (Hedw.) Warnst.

Drepanocladus uncinatus var. plumosus (Schimp.) Warnst.

Drepanocladus uncinatus var. subjulaceus (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Warnst.

Hypnum uncinatum subsp. moseri (Kindberg) Kindberg [FNA, 2014]

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

(As Hypnum uncinatum Hedw.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1570-74) (Roell 1893).

[All as Drepanocladus uncinatus (Hedw.) Warnst.] Albany County, Big Horn County, Carbon County, Teton County, and Yellowstone National Park. “The following varieties have been recorded: var. auriculatus, plumosus and symmetricus,” Porter, 1935. Albany, Big Horn, Carbon, Fremont, Johnson, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mtns., Medicine Bow National Forest, Barber Lake Picnic Area 2.5 miles NW of Centennial, 2660 msm, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, Buck 23195 (NY); on leaf mold in woods 1 1/4 miles S of Brooklyn Lake, alt. 10,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 9 miles W of Centennial Hermann 17693 (RM) Aug. 3, 1962. CARBON CO.: on a rotten log, Battle Creek Canyon, 7,000 ft, Porter 1736 (RM), June 26, 1934. FREMONT CO.: on moderately dry soil and humus, Brooks Lake, To-Gwo-Tee Pass, C. L. Porter 1614 (RM), Aug. 15, 1934. PARK CO.: 3250 msm, W.A.Weber B-44265 (COLO, RM); Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm, Weber B-44276 (COLO, RM) Aug. 19, 1973; basaltic sand, 6000ft., Vukelich April 1, 1988 (BUF), det. Crum; wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1725 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990; PARK CO. (with Hygrohypnum styriacum specimen, q.v.):  Beartooth Lake, W and SW shore, Picea engelmannii forest along the shore, on wet clay, assoc.: Sanionia uncinata, Calliergonella cuspidata, T57N R105W S6&7, 44*56.500-520’N, 109*35.980-990’W, elev. ca. 8,900 ft (2700 m), 24 Jul 2010 Kosovich-Anderson 6652 [no herb. cited]; SHERIDAN CO.: (as var. uncinatus) conifer litter over mineral soil in spruce/fir forest, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-F2 (RM), June 19, 1992, with Tortula ruraliformis; in packet of Bryum capillare, with Philonotis fontana var. fontana, Dome Lake, July 16, 1896 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 South fork Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°34'W. Along small stream, on rocks. Richard Andrus 7840 (BING); Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, ss rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley. July 5, 1985, shaded sandstone rock, P. M. Eckel 9612516 (BUF, RM) + Brachythecium salebrosum. TETON CO: , on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters. Soil, forest floor, over organic debris, including punky wood, July 6, 1985, w. Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum, Eckel 9408200. YELLOWSTONE NATNL PARK: in the spray of the falls, Tower Falls, Aven & Elias Nelson 5911 (RM) exsiccat Plants of Yellowstone Natl. Park, det. Holzinger.

 

There is a var. symmetrica (Ren. & Card.) Crum & Anderson in the 1990 checklist, which is accepted as Sanionia symmetrica (Renauld & Cardot) Wheldon (FNA Vol. 28, 2014). It is a western taxon to be looked for in Wyoming - capsules are needed for identification.

 

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SARMENTYPNUM Tuomikoski & T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 16: 223. 1979  (Calliergonaceae)

 

Sarmentypnum exannulatum (Schimper) Hedenäs, J. Hattori Bot. Lab. 100: 132. 2006

Hypnum exannulatum Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 110, plate 603. 1854  (Calliergonaceae)

 

Hypnum exannulatum Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper

Drepanocladus exannulatus (Schimper) Warnstorf

Drepanocladus. exannulatus var. purpurascens (Schimper) Herzog

Drepanocladus. exannulatus var. rotae (De Notaris) Loeske

Warnstorfia exannulata (Schimper) Loeske

Warnstorfia exannulata var. purpurascens (Schimper) Tuomikoski & T. J. Koponen

 

(Synonymy for Warnstorfia exannulata (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Loeske in earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Drepanocladus exannulatus (B.S.G.) Warnst. var. exannulatus

Drepanocladus exannulatus var. alpinus (Grav.) Wijk & Marg.

Drepanocladus exannulatus var. brachydictyon (Ren.) G. Roth

Drepanocladus exannulatus var. falcifolius (Ren.) Grout

Drepanocladus exannulatus var. rotae (De Not.) Loesk.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Park Co.: Sarmentypnum exannulatum was reported growing with Plagiomnium ellipticum, Polytrichum juniperinum, Sarmentypnum. sarmentosum and Sanionia nivalis(Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

[All as Drepanocladus exannulatus (B.S.G.) Warnst. var. exannulatus]: Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co. “species occupying peatland expanses and spring fens ... tolerant of long periods of saturation and submersion,” Cooper & Andrus (1994. var. typicus Grand Teton Nat. Park 3765 (NY) Wynne, 1944. ALBANY CO.: 10,800 ft., H. Rolston III, 86090 (CS U); La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5262 (RM), Aug. 30, 1898; northwest base of Sheep Mtn., along WY Rte. 11; ca. 4 miles due ESE of Centennial; ca. 7,750 ft., fen with low forest of Populus, Betula, Salix in shallow water, a “hanging bog” on step hillside, open area of bog, W. D. Reese 18174 (LAF) June 4, 1993 with Bryum pseudotriquestrum, Cratoneuron filicinum. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn National Forest, Lake Solitude Quadrant. Cloud Peak Wilderness area. T50N R86W, Sec. 7, 9,720 ft. August 5, 1992. Streamside below Elk Mountain, Katherine Zacharkevics (BING). CARBON CO.: 9,200 ft., C.L.Porter 9698 (RM); Sierra Madre Range, 9600 ft., wet area by stream, Kastning-Culp 754 (BUF, RM); emergent in pool in marsh near North French Creek at logging road crossing alt. 8600 ft., Medicine Bow Mountains, 6 miles E of Ryan Park, Hermann 26718 (RM), Aug. 27, 1975. PARK CO. 3200 msm, W.A.Weber B- 44310 (COLO, RM); wet soil in white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1929 (BUF) April 19, 1992. SUBLETTE CO.: 11,200 ft., Holmes Rolston III 85109 (CSU).

 

[All as var. rotae (De Not.) Loesk.] “Leaves more widely spaced and costa shortly to long filiform excurrent.” Flowers p. 502. ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., Silver Lake, growing 1/2 mile N of lake in a bog. Abundant, Lichvar, Robert 1335 (RM), 10,000 ft., Sept. 18, 1977. Specimen with large, distinct auricles to costa, long, filiform apices, leaves distant on stem. SUBLETTE CO.: (var. rotae) Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/4 mile SW of Barnes Lake, 9780 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°36'W. Pothole fen. Richard Andrus 7807 (BING). I thank J. Janssens for identification of this Weber specimen: PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Hwy; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm; in shallow water of small lakes, W. A. Weber B-44252 (RM, COLO) Aug. 19, 1973 [originally id'd as D. trichophyllus].

 

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Sarmenthypnum sarmentosum (Wahlenberg) Tuomikoski & T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 16: 223. 1979

Hypnum sarmentosum Wahlenberg, Fl. Lapp., 380. 1812      (Calliergonaceae) unillo

 

Hypnum sarmentosum Wahlenberg

Warnstorfia sarmentosa (Wahlenberg) Hedenäs (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(Synonymy from earlierWyoming  checklist:)

Calliergon sarmentosum (Wahlenb.) Kindb.

Calliergon sarmentosum fo. heterophyllum Arnell & C. Jens.

Calliergon sarmentosum fo. homophyllum Arnell & C. Jens.

Calliergon sarmentosum var. beringianum (Card. & Thér.) Grout

Calliergon sarmentosum var. crispum Karcz.

Calliergon sarmentosum var. fallaciosum (Milde) G. Roth

Calliergon sarmentosum var. flagellare Karcz.

Calliergon sarmentosum var. fontinaloides (Berggr.) G. Roth

Calliergon sarmentosum var. subpinnatum Warnst.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol.28, 2014).

 

Park Co.: Sarmentypnum sarmentosum was reported growing with Plagiomnium ellipticum, Polytrichum juniperinum, Sarmentypnum exannulatum and Sanionia nivalis (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011). Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co., “species occupying peatland expanses and spring fens ... tolerant of long periods of saturation and submersion,” Cooper & Andrus (1994). Cited for Wyoming by Crum & Anderson p. 1998.

 

PARK CO.: 3250 msm, Weber, W.A. B-44254 (RM, COLO). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 South fork Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°34'W. In small fen. Richard Andrus 7828 (BING).

 

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Sarmentypnum tundrae (Arnell) Hedenäs, J. Hattori Bot. Lab. 100: 133. 2006

Amblystegium tundrae Arnell, Kongl. Svenska Vetensk. Acad. Handl., n. s. 23(10): 128. 1890  (Calliergonaceae)

 

Drepanocladus exannulatus var. tundrae (Arnell) Warnstor

Drepanocladus tundrae (Arnell) Loeske

Warnstorfia tundrae (Arnell) Loeske

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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SCHISTIDIUM Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 93. 1845, name conserved (Grimmiaceae)

 

Schistidium agassizii Sullivant & Lesquereux, Musc. Hepat. U.S., 104. 1856

   (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia agassizii (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Jaeger & Sauerbeck

Grimmia alpicola Hedw. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia alpicola var. angusta (I. Hag.) Moenk.

Schistidium agassizii Sull. & Lesq. in Sull.

Schistidium angustum I. Hag.

Schistidium lineare Limpr.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Brit. Colo., Oregon, Alberta, Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Alaska, Northwest Territory, Cal., Colo.; Michigan, Ontario; New Brunswick, Quebec Maine, New York. Carbon Co.: inlet to Lake Marie, Medicine Bow Mts. (Hermann 17147), Robinson & Herman, 1964. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

CARBON CO.: 10,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 17147 (RM).

 

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[Schistidium apocarpum (Hedwig) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 99. 1845

Grimmia apocarpa Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 76. 1801 (Grimmiaceae)

 

[there are no varieties recognized in the 1990 checklist. Not reported for Wyoming in FNA (Vol. 27, 2007).]

 

There is some controversy whether this species occurs only in the eastern United States or has a more widespread distribution. For now it is reported here as excluded from Wyoming (McIntosh in Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Only three synonyms are given for this species in FNA Vol. 27, 2007:

Grimmia apocarpa Hedw.

Schistidium lancifolium H. H. Blom

Schistidium umbrosum (J. E. Zetterstedt) H. H. Blom

 

(Synonymy listed in the earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Grimmia alpicola var. dupretii (Thér.) Crum

Grimmia apocarpa Hedw.

Grimmia apocarpa car. conferta (Funck) Spreng.

Grimmia apocarpa var. ambigua (Sull.) G. Jones in Grout

Grimmia apocarpa var. atrofusca (Schimp.) Husn.

Grimmia apocarpa var. brunnescens (Limpr.) Moenk.

Grimmia apocarpa var. conferta (Funck) Spreng. in Linn.,

Grimmia apocarpa var. dupretii (Thér.) Sayre

Grimmia apocarpa var. gracilis Web. & Mohr ex Nees et al.

Grimmia apocarpa var. nigrescens Mol.

Grimmia apocarpa var. obscuroviridis Crum

Grimmia apocarpa var. stricta (Turn.) Hook. & Tayl.

Grimmia apocarpa var. tenerrima Nees & Hornsch. in Nees et al.

Grimmia atricha C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun & Kindb.

[Grimmia conferta Funck = Schistidium confertum (Funck) B.S.G.,  recognized below]

[Grimmia dupretii Thér., = Schistidium dupretii (Thér.) W. A. Weber recognized below]

Grimmia fasciculata Brid.

Grimmia glacialis Nees, Hornsch, & Sturm

Grimmia gracilis (Web. & Mohr ex Nees et al.) Schleich. ex Limpr.

Grimmia gracillima Bartr.

[Grimmia platyphylla Stirt. = Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp. q.v.]

Grimmia stricta Turn.

Grimmia strigosa Brid.

Grimmia trichodon Brid.

 [Schistidium apocarpum var. dupretii (Thér.) Wijk & Marg. = Schistidium dupretii (Thér.) W. A. Weber, recognized below]

[Schistidium confertum (Funck) B.S.G., recognized below]

Schistidium gracile (Schleich. ex Schwaegr.) Limpr.

 

The species is not reported for Wyoming and appears to be absent from central Canada and the United States. It appears to occur north of the boundary with Canada, except in the Great Lakes area and Washington State (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Due to the recent extensive revisions of nomenclature, the following information is conjectural:

 

In all states and prov. of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Cal., Nev., Ariz., New Mex; widespread in central and eastern North America. Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1937. Brit. Colo., Wash., Oregon, Idaho, Mont. Wyoming; Michigan, Ont. Quebec, New York. Wyoming, Flowers 1973. Little Goose, Creek, Sheridan County (Aven Nelson, 2416, in part), Porter 1935. (As Grimmia atricha C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun & Kindb., Cat. Canad. Pl. 6: 65. 1892.) (As Schistidium apocarpa) Teton Co., Spence 1985. Telephone Canyon, Albany County (Porter, 607); Long Canyon, Albany Co. (Rollins, 63), [Sheridan Co.], Porter, 1935.. (As G. dupretii Thér.) Plumbago Canyon, Albany County (Porter, 482); Hoback Canyon, Teton Co. (Porter, 1162), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mtns., Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, 2400 msm, Buck 23174 (NY), old fruit, some with opercula, June 7, 1993. PARK CO.: 6500 ft., small plants with yellowish red per. teeth, moderately cribrose, F. J. Hermann 20032 (RM). FREMONT CO.: thin soil on undersurface of granite ledge on slope. W slpe of Fiddler's Lake (Wyo. Rte. 131) 9300 ft., 22 miles SSW of Lander, Hermann 25297 (RM), June 18, 1973. LINCOLN CO.: 6700 ft., F.J. Hermann 25597 (RM). PARK CO.: granite bluff along Route 212, Shoshone Natl. Forest, 7500 ft., 46 miles NW of Cody, Hermann 20063 (RM), July 19, 1965. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: on US14, 16 & 20 just before E entrance to Park, border with Shoshone National Forest. 6951'. Granitic rocks, Spruce-Pine woods, Juniperus woodland, xeric, S slope, c.fr., July 6, 1985 with Dicranoweisia crispula, Eckel 94082303 (BUF).

 

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Schistidium confertum (Funck) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 99. 1845

Grimmia conferta Funck, Deutschl. Moose, 18. 1820  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Grimmia apocarpa var. conferta Fk.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1470). Upper Falls (1454, 1458, 1461, 1468 and f. rivularis Nees et H. (1485) (Roell 1893).

 

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Schistidium dupretii (Thériot) W. A. Weber,  Phytologia 33: 106. 1976

Grimmia dupretii Thériot, Bryologist 10: 63, plate 8. 1907      (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Schistidium apocarpum var. dupretii (Thér.) Wijk & Marg.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Schistidium frigidum H. H. Blom, Bryophyt.  Biblioth. 49: 181, fig. 70. 1996  (Grimmiaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

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Schistidium occidentale (Lawton) Churchill, Advances Cladist. 1: 143. 1981

Grimmia occidentalis Lawton, Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 94: 461, figs. 1–15. 1967 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia alpicola var. rivularis f. acutifolia Grout

Grimmia occidentalis Lawt.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Montana, Wyoming; California, Nevada, Colorado.

 

ALBANY CO.: 9000 ft., F.J. Hermann 17761 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Lake Jacqueline, ca. 9,800 ft elev. 42°57'30”N, 109°37'W on rocks in stream, Andrus 7779 (BING).

 

 

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Schistidium rivulare (Bridel) Podpera, Beih. Bot. Centralbl. 28(2): 207. 1911

Grimmia rivularis Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1800(1): 276. 1801      (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia alpicola of American authors

Grimmia alpicola var. rivularis (Brid.) Wahl.

Grimmia platyphylla Mitten

Schistidium platyphyllum (Mitten) Persson

Schistidium rivulare subsp. latifolium (Zetterst.) Bremer

Schistidium submuticum subsp. arcticum H. H. Blom (all FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Yellowstone National Park: (as Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp. ssp. rivulare) 1938 Bartley & Pontius (NY) in Bremer, 1980. Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp. Teton Co., Spence 1985. See Roell citation under Schistidium confertum f. rivularis.

 

ALBANY CO.: (var. rivulare) moist soil in shaded crevice of calcareous sandstone bluff, Roger Canyon, 8000 ft, 10 miles NE of Laramie, Hermann 17156 (RM) Aug. 19, 1961. CARBON CO.: (var. rivularis) W slope of Sierra Madre, Battle Creek Canyon, 8,500 ft, streamside forest of Engelmann Spruce, on rocks in dry places, C. & M. W. Porter 9718 (RM) Aug. 18, 1964. FREMONT CO.: (as var. rivulare) wet rock in stream on partially shaded slope, along Fiddler's Lake Rd (Wyo. 131) 8600 ft., ca. 14 miles SSW of Lander, Hermann 25304 (RM) June 18, 1973. SUBLETTE CO.: (var. rivulare) Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 17/viii/1989 Lake Sequa, 9940 ft. elev. 42°57'30”N, 109°34'W, R. Andrus 7882 (BING); Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley, shaded sandstone rock, July 5, 1985 P. M. Eckel 961258 (BUF). TETON CO.: (var. rivularis) vertical face of boulder on bank of Cascade Creek, near mouth of Cascade Canyon, W shore of Jenny Lake, 7000 ft., Teton Range, Grand Teton Natl. Pk. Hermann 25583 (RM), Aug. 29, 1973.

 

Note the specimen 9718 from Carbon Co. is the largest of its kind, with very elongate stems and leaves to 3.5 mm. The leaves were ovate-lanceolate to nearly triangular. Note it is Flowers that describes the group of Grimmia species including 3.5 mm. Others (Crum & Anderson and Lawton) 2.5 and 2.8 mm. Lawton indicates the stems of var. rivularis can be to 10 cm long.

The following are probably all Schistidium rivulare var. rivulare: (As Grimmia alpicola Sw. ex Hedw. = all following synonymy) Note in 1990 checklist Grimmia alpicola auct. Amer. = Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp. var. rivulare.

 

Grimmia apocarpa var. alpicola (Hedw.) Roehl.

Grimmia helvetica Schkuhr

Schistidium alpicola (Hedw.) Limpr.

 

In all states and prov of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Cal., Colo., Manitoba, S. Dakota, Michigan, Ontario; Newfoundland and Labrador to North Carolina. Grimmia alpicola Hedw. Big Sandstone Creek, Carbon Co. (Porter, 927), Porter, 1935.

 

LINCOLN CO.: on boulder in partial clearing in spruce-fir woods along Porcupine Creek, Greys River Valley, 6600 ft., Salt River Range, 18 miles SE of Alpine Junction, Hermann 25594 (RM) Aug. 30, 1973. PARK CO.: granite outcrop on bank of Crandall Creek, 6500 ft., Shoshone Natl. Forest, 36 miles NW of Cody, Hermann 20038 1/2 (RM) July 19, 1965, with Orthotrichum sp. SHERIDAN CO.: Crevice in limestone boulder in spruce/fir forest, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-F5 c. fr., dehisced young (not eroded), June 19, 1992 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: (var. alpicola) on boulder on open slope, W shore of Lower Green River Lake, 7950 ft., Wind River Range, 50 miles N of Pinedale, Hermann 25321 (RM) June 19, 1973.

 

Schistidium rivulare var. latifolium (Zett.) Crum & Anderson = Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

The following synonymy was originally published here for the var. latifolium:

 

Grimmia alpicola var. latifolia (Zett.) Moell.

Grimmia apocarpa f. latifolia Zett.

Grimmia platyphylla Mitt.

Schistidium alpicola var. latifolia (Zett.) Limpr.

 

Brit. Colo., Alberta, Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Alaska, New Brunswick.

 

PARK CO.: 6000 ft. on basaltic sand or rock, Vukelich April 1, 1988 (BUF) [leaves 0.7-1 mm broad].

 

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Schistidium tenerum (J. E. Zetterstedt) Nyholm, Ill. Moss. Fl. Fennoscand., Musci, 775. 1969

Grimmia tenera J. E. Zetterstedt, Kongl. Svenska Vetensk. Acad. Handl., n. s. 13(13): 17. 1876      (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia tenuicaulis Williams

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Alberta, Mont., Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon, Northwest Territory, Col; Greenland. (As Grimmia tenuicaulis Williams) Dale Creek, Albany Co. (Porter, 979), Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8500 ft., F.J. Hermann 17751 1/2 (RM).

 

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SCIURO-HYPNUM (Hampe) Hampe, Linnaea 38: 220. 1874 (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum sect. Sciuro-hypnum Hampe, Flora 50: 76. 1867

 

Sciuro-hypnum glaciale (Schimper) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 270. 2003

Brachythecium glaciale Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 15, plate 542. 1853   (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming; “Soil, rock, near glaciers, open, cold habitats; low to high elevations (0--3200 m); Greenland; Wyo;” “Sciuro-hypnum glaciale has a wide distribution globally, but is probably locally common only in Scandinavia.  In North America it is confirmed in Greenland and high mountains in Wyoming, but probably occurs also in other regions of the North American Arctic” (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

PARK CO.: SNG, Beartooth Plateau, alpine snow melt area, small lake in vast depression, ca. 100 m N of Beartooth Scenic Byway, boggy shore crossed by rills, Carex spp. - Bryidae wetlands, wet tussocks, on clay soil, associated with Polytrichastrum alpinum (Hedw.) G. L. Smith; N 44*58.510-515’, W 109*27.165-170’, alt. 10,500 ft (3200 M), 20 August 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 3508 (MHA, MO, RM).

 

Range is bipolar arctic-alpine. “... the collection from Wyoming is the only one in continental North America. It extends the known range by no less than 4400 km representing an extraordinary arctic-alpine disjunction in the Rocky Mountains” (Kosovich-Anderson & Ignatov 2010).

 

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Sciuro-hypnum latifolium (Kindberg) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 270. 2003

Brachythecium latifolium Kindberg, Forh. Vidensk.-Selsk. Kristiania 1888(6): 8. 1888  (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

 

Brachythecium nelsonii Grout

Sciuro-hypnum nelsonii (Grout) Ochyra & Żarnowiec (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium nelsonii) Pole Mt., Albany County (Porter, 537); Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5172); Lake and Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley). Elias Nelson's 5172 is the type referred to by Dr. Grout (1902), Porter, 1935. [Albany Co. (Porter 1433; 537); Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1934. Albany Co., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.] Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

(As Brachythecium nelsonii) ALBANY CO.: wet bank of pond in mountain meadow, 1 1/4 miles S of Brooklyn Lake, 10,000 ft. Medicine Bow Mts. 9 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17690 (RM); Medicine Bow Mountains, Barber Lake Picnic area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek, 8720-8740 ft. Pinus contorta forest; streamside, on rock, N.G. Miller 10,259 (NYS) June 7, 1993. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mts. Aven Nelson 2234 (RM) July, 1896. SUBLETTE CO.: 10,324 ft., Holmes Rolston, III 85103 (CS); 10,595 ft., Holmes Rolston, III 85096 (CS). YELLOWSTONE NATONAL PARK: slope along old road, Crescent Hill, H. Conard 2045, Sept. 3, 1948 (NY).

 

(As Brachythecium nelsonii) Grout placed this species right beside B. rivulare, which it resembles except for [Albany specimen] its flat leaves (stems appear complanate, flattened, not dendroid), nearly entire leaf margins and extensive area of inflated hyaline cells extending to near the costa [note in the Albany specimen the leaf cells were 6: 1 and in many cases even shorter! The specimen was sterile, but the alar cells and entire leaf margins were decisive]. Flowers wrote that B. starkei did not have the linear upper leaf cells of nelsonii: the Hermann specimen shows this (the leaves in this specimen had almost no acumination). Starkei has serrulate leaf margins, B. nelsonii generally not. LEAVES DELTOID-OVATE like B. starkei. “Apex is usually sharply and abruptly acuminate but sometimes long and slender” (Flowers): Lawton and others emphasise a long acumen or narrowly acute leaf. Note in B. rivulare, the apices are broad near the apex. Nelsonii frequently has a short acumination, but is not broad. It is flat above, not bowling out like B. rivulare. The alar cells of B. rivulare may be large and appear to fill the same spaces as B. nelsonii (to 1/2 the leaf base and more), yet they are never as numerous as nelsonii. If B. rivulare does not look particularly concave, it will appear plicate or somewhat so. Nelsonii is flat. Both have non serrulate leaf margins. In B. rivulare, the inflated cells appear much more abruptly differentiated and defined, in B. nelsonii they appear to spread across the lamina, flat or auriculate. Porter (1934) indicated intergrading between B. nelsonii and B. rivulare, and that B. nelsonii was only a subspecies of B. rivulare. In Nelson No. 2234 the plants were bright yellow-green and complanate, spreading wet or dry, and stoloniferous. Flowers describes B. nelsonii as “sometimes thin and straggling, mostly bright green, often becoming yellowish or straw colored.” The specimen was first identified as B. rutabulum, which has this vivid green, but the plant was apparently dioicous (only males seen) and the alar cells were abruptly inflated and decurrent. [Porter, 1934, as B. rutabulum]

 

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Sciuro-hypnum oedipodium (Mitten) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 270. 2003

Hypnum oedipodium Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 32, plate 5 [lower right]. 1864    (Brachytheciaceae)

 

Hypnum oedipodium Mitten

Brachythecium collinum var. holzingeri Grout

Brachythecium holzingeri (Grout) Grout

Brachythecium oedipodium (Mitten) A. Jaeger (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(Synonymy of  Brachythecium oedipodium from earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Brachythecium curtum (Lindb.) Limpr. [1990 checklist]

Brachythecium curtum (Lindb.) Limpr. [in Lawt.]

Brachythecium starkei subsp. oedipodium (Mitt.) Ren. & Card. [1990 checklist]

Brachythecium starkei var. curtum (Lindb.) Warnst. [1990 checklist]

Brachythecium starkei var. explanatum (Brid.) Moenk.

Brachythecium starkei var. explanatum (Brid.) Moenk. [1990 checklist]

 

(As Brachythecium oedipodium) “The following features distinguish B. starkei from B. curtum: plants smaller, having longer-pointed leaves with a longer costa (in branch leaves at least) and narrower cells. Brachythecium starkei differs from B. reflexum in having narrower leaf decurrencies and narrower cells” Crum & And. p. 1032. Lawton indicates that in B. reflexum, the costa extends to the apex or nearly so: this may help to distinguish B. starkei.

 

Brachythecium starkei is currently Sciuro-hypnum starkei (Bridel) Ignatov & Huttunen, not reported from Wyoming, a species of northeastern North America with a western outlier in Wisconsin (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium starkei, Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, subspecies Oedipodium Mitt. f. depauperata [sic] (1593) (Roell 1893).

 

(As Brachythecium oedipodium) Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

(As Brachythecium oedipodium) ALBANY CO: carpeting floor of spruce forest, Little Brooklyn Lake, 10,400 ft, Medicine Bow Mts, 7 miles NW of Centennial, Hermann 26721 (RM) Aug. 27, 1975. FREMONT CO.: thin soil on boulder on spruce-fir slope, Burroughs Creek Rd., 8400 ft., Absaroka Range, 14 miles N of Dubois, Hermann 25524 (RM) [det. Lawton]. PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway, under late snow patch on steep slope N of switchback; rills and snowbeds, 3200 msm, Weber, B-44307 (COLO, RM, US) [with B. salebrosum]. LINCOLN CO: clay bank of Greys River in meadow, alt. 6600ft. Salt River Range, 18 miles SE of Alpine Junction, Hermann 25596 (RM), Aug. 30, 1973. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 2. 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake. Richard Andrus 7792b (BING). TETON CO: on US26 & US287, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000,' Picea-Pinus flexilis, Pinus contorta v. latifolia, xeric, some Artemisia, forest floor, c.fr. July 6, 1985, Eckel 94081601 (BUF, RM).

 

(As Brachythecium oedipodium) A specimen from Poland (Ochyra Musci Poloniae Exsiccati 280) seems to suit general descriptions of B. starkei var. explanatum. However, its medial leaf cells were as elongate as any seen in B. nelsonii or B. rivulare. They were sharply serrulate and the leaves were more narrowly oblong-lanceolate, rather than the deltoid things of B. nelsonii and B. rivulare.

 

(As Brachythecium oedipodium) The basal cells are indeed larger and clearer than the other cells, but they are nowhere near as numerous as in B. nelsonii nor as abruptly inflated or otherwise differentiated as in B. rivulare. The best that can be said about them is that they are not abruptly or strikingly differentiated as in these other two taxa. Note Weber (1973) indicates that B. nelsonii is “quite close to B. starkei and sterile specimens are not easy to separate.” The Ochyra specimen showed leaves very distant on the stem... Crum & Anderson: p. 1030, the serrulate midrib: B. rutabulum has no spines.

 

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Sciuro-hypnum plumosum (Hedwig) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 270. 2003

Hypnum plumosum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 257. 1801    (Brachytheciaceae)

 

Hypnum plumosum Hedwig

Brachythecium plumosum (Hedwig) Schimper

Eurhynchium semiasperum Müller Hal. & Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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SCORPIDIUM (Schimper) Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 3: 570. 1899  (Calliergonaceae)

Hypnum subg. Scorpidium Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur., 650. 1860; Limprichtia Loeske

 

Scorpidium revolvens (Swartz) Rubers in A. Touw and W. V. Rubers, Nederl. Bladmoss., 380. 1989

Hypnum revolvens Swartz ex Anonymo, Monthly Rev. 34: 538. 1801     (Calliergonaceae)

 

Drepanocladus revolvens (Swartz) Warnstorf

Drepanocladus revolvens var. miquelonensis (Renauld & Cardot) Grout

Limprichtia revolvens (Swartz) Loeske (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

 [As Drepanocladus revolvens (Sw.) Warnst.]: Wynne, 1944; who gives a dot map showing a station in the Big Horn Mountain area of Wyoming.

 

(As Limprichtia revolvens) SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/2 mile southwest of Barnes Lake, 9760 ft. elev., 42°57'N, 109°36'W. Terrace fen. In Eleocharis stand. Richard Andrus 77816c (BING).

 

(As Limprichtia revolvens) Beautiful lustrous golden-coppery to red moss with inflated cortical cells, small central strand and thick-walled alar cells often not coming off with the dissected leaf. They are described variously as few and hyaline (Weber & Lawton who says they are rather quadrate, which they are - making one pause a bit) with pitted basal cells. Crum & Anderson make the useful observation that the cells across the insertion are somewhat darker “oblong-linear, with thickened, porose walls” grading to the variety intermedius where the cells across the insertion are “not much differentiated.” The few cells at the basal angles “hyaline and slightly enlarged.” It appears that the costa is somewhat short for the genus, too. The presence of a central strand separates this from D. vernicosus (C&A 971).

 

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Scorpidium scorpioides (Hedwig) Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 3: 571. 1899

Hypnum scorpioides Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 295. 1801.        (Calliergonaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

PARK CO.: wet marl in calcareous fen complex at the base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 miles E of Crandall Ranger Station, Shoshone Natl. Forest, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1749 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990.

 

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SCOULERIA Hooker, Bot. Misc. 1: 33. 1829  (Scouleriaceae)

Grimmia sect. Scouleria (Hooker) Müller Hal.; Grimmia subgen. Scouleria (Hooker) Lesquereux &

James

 

Scouleria aquatica Hooker in T. Drummond, Musc. Amer., 63. 1828 (Scouleriaceae)

 

Guembelia scouleri C. Muell.

Scouleria aquatica var. catilliformis C.  Muell.

Scouleria aquatica var. nigrescens Kindb. in Macoun

Scouleria aquatica var. virescens Kindb. in Macoun

Scouleria muelleri Kindb. in Macoun

Scouleria nevii C. Muell. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and prov. in the Pacific Northwest: Alaska, Calif. Laramie Peak, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7559); Little Goose Creek, Sheridan Co. (Aven Nelson, 2416, in part); Amphithestre Lake, Teton Co. (L. ). Williams, 1035b); Leigh Lake, Teton Co. (Porter, 1189), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Type of var. catilliformis C. Muell. in Roll, Bot. Centralbl. 44: 389, 1890. Yellowstone River, Wyoming (Churchill, 1985). “Scouleria catilliformis C. Müll. on stones in water in Yellowstone Natnl. Park, Wyom.” (Roell 1893); also as the new variety Scouleria aquatica var. catilliformis (1456) of which Yellowstone Park would be the type locality.

 

ALBANY CO.; 7,800 ft., F.J. Herman 25926 (RM); Laramie Peak, A. Nelson 7559 (MO, NY, RM, US). PARK CO.: Crandall Creek, 6500 ft., F. J. Hermann 20041 (RM);

PARK CO.: [associated with Hygrohypnum styriacum specimen, q.v.: SNF, Beartooth Plateau: Beartooth Creek, granite debris along the creek; attached to boulders periodically wet by spray and seasonally covered with fast flowing water, assoc. with Scouleria aquatica, T57N R105W S7, 44*36.270-280 N, 109* 36.010-020’W, elev. ca. 8,900 ft (2700 m), 23 Aug 2009, Kosovich-Anderson 5431 (COLO); SHERIDAN CO.: Big Goose Creekm Reed C. Rollins 360 (RM); Little Goose Creek, A. Nelson July 18, 1896 (RM). TETON CO.: Teton Range, 7,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25582 (RM).

 

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SELIGERIA Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 7. 1856 (Seligeriaceae)

 

Seligeria campylopoda Kindberg in J. Macoun and  N. C. Kindberg, Cat. Canad. Pl., Musci, 41. 1892 (Seligeriaceae) unillo

 

Seligeria recurvata (Hedwig) Bruch & Schimper var. arcuata Lesquereux & James

Seligeria  subcampylopoda Kindberg [FNA Vol. 27, 2007]

 

SWEETWATER CO.: Teton National Forest, 5.3 mi N of Bondurant on US 191 and 189, Hoback River Valley, N-facing slope, rich moist valley woodland, 5 July, 1985, Eckel 1121885 (ALTA, BUF, RM).

 

Note that although Seligeria campylopoda is not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), this was probably an oversight as the author of Seligeria (D. H. Vitt) in FNA also verified the species noted (Eckel 1986).

 

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SPHAGNUM Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 1106. 1753; Gen. Pl. ed. 5, 487. 1754  (Sphagnaceae).

 

SPHAGNUM (Sphagnaceae).

 

Wyoming seems to be rather depauperate of plants of this genus (14 species), and Colorado with even less (11 species). This depauperation in Colorado is attributed to the “elevated landscape [which] provides mineral-rich aquatic habitats [cf. soligenous water from run-off, mineral-rich]; we have no areas in which the wetlands are dependent upon rain-water alone [ombrotrophic, ‘poor in nutrients’]. Our fens are not very acid [acid = oligotrophic, ‘poor in minerals’], hence many of the northern Sphagnum species are excluded from this area” (Weber & Wittmann 2007). The moss flora of the Aleutian Islands, in contrast, has 23 species (Schofield & Talbot, in prep.).

 

[Sphagnum acutifolium Ehrh. (Sphagnaceae)

 

Shoshone Lakes in Yellowstone National Park (Coulter, in 1872) [from Nelson 1900], “no material seen” (Porter, 1935). Note: “The names Sphagnum acutifolium Schrader and S. nemoreum Scopoli (doubtful name) have also been used [for S. capillifolium, q.v.] (FNA Vol. 27, 2007). Otherwise, S. acutifolium is a name not used for the flora of North America.]

 

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Sphagnum angustifolium (Warnstorf) C. E. O. Jensen, Bih. Svenska Vetensk.-Akad. Handl. 16(9): 46. 1891

Sphagnum recurvum var. angustifolium Warnstorf, Nyt. Mag.  Naturvidensk. 31: 213. 1888.

(Sphagnaceae) (sect. Mollusca) unillo

 

Sphagnum amblyphyllum var. parvifolium (Sendtner) Warnstorf

Sphagnum flexuosum var. tenue (H. Klinggraff) Pilous;

Sphagnumparvifolium (Warnstorf) Warnstorf; S. recurvum var. parvifolium Warnstorf

Sphagnum recurvum var. tenue H. Klinggraff [FNA Vol. 27, 2007]

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), including a boreal distribution extending down into states just north of those bordering the southern United States and absent from the central plains states.

 

PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm, W. A. Weber B-44268 (COLO, RM), Aug. 19, 1973 [annot Andrus].

 

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Sphagnum annulatum Warnstorf, Bot. Centralbl. 76: 422. 1898 (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Mollusca)

 

Sphagnum jensenii var. annulatum (Warnst.) Warnst. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); with generally a boreal distribution just entering the northern United States.

 

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Sphagnum annulatum var. porosum (Warnst.) W. S. G. Maas = Sphagnum jensenii H. Lindb.

 

[Sphagnum capillifolium (Ehrhart) Hedwig, Fund. Hist. Nat. Musc. Frond. 2: 86. 1782   (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Acutifolia) excluded

 

Sphagnum palustre var. capillifolium Ehrhart, Hannover Mag. 18: 235. 1780

Sphagnum capillaceum (Weiss) Schrank

Sphagnum capillifolium var. viride Jennings

Sphagnum margaritae H. A. Crum [FNA Vol. 27, 2007]

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); with a boreal to northern American states distribution.

 

 (As Sphagnum capillaceum) Yellowstone National Park, Porter 1937.

 

[annotated in first checklist: Excluded. I have no records for this species. I've determined several Porter #'s (1198 & 1199) from 1932 as S. russowii so I expect that's what the record of S. capillifolium is; Weber and  Wittman ( (2007) also exclude S. capillifolium from the Colorado flora.]

 

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Sphagnum contortum Schultz, Prodr. Fl. Starg. Suppl., 64. 1819  (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Subsecunda) unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), with a mid-boreal, northern American states distribution in the east and west, with plains states and provinces absent.

 

Specimen from Wind Rivers is in BING.

 

Sphagnum dusenii Russow & Warnst. = Sphagnum majus (Russow) C.E.O. Jensen subsp. majus

 

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Sphagnum fimbriatum Wilson & Hooker in J. D. Hooker, Fl. Antarct., 398. 1847 (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Acutifolia) unillo

 

Sphagnum bolanderi Warnstorf (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Not recorded for Wyoming; ); the subsp. concinnum (Berggren) Flatberg & Frisvoll grows in Alaska (McQueen & Andrus, FNA Vol. 27, 2007); s.l., the species is boreal and north to middle American states, with a corridor of absence in the central plains states.

 

“Sphagnum fimbriatum Wils. var. densum m. and var. gracilescens .m. in Yellowstone Nat.-Park, Wyom.” (Roell 1893). Note that it is Roell himself who identified his own collections (the Torfmoosen). “In Great beds on wet bottoms: Obsidian Creek, Yellowstone National Park July 24, 1899, no. 6118; Sylvan Geysers, July 26, no. 6181” (Nelson 1900).

(Porter, 1935). Beaver Lake and Sylvan Geysers in Yellowstone National Park (A. Nelson, 6118 & 6181) (Porter, 1935). Yellowstone National Park, Porter 1937.

 

PARK CO: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm, W. A. Weber B-44287 (COLO, RM), Aug. 19, 1973 [annot Andrus]. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: in great beds on the shores of the lake, Beaver Lake, Aven & Elias Nelson 6118 [printed label, annot. Andrus] July 24, 1899; in the bogs or the open woods, Sylvan Geysers, Aven & Elias Nelson 6181 (RM), July 26, 1899 [annot Andrus]; geothermal fen complex, with Sphagnum capillifolium and S. platyphyllum: along Bog Creek at 2500 m (8200 ft); the species occurred “on the tips of strings above pools with pH as low as 2.9 (Lemly & Cooper #848, COLO, YELL, BING)” (Lemly, Andrus & Cooper 2007).

 

Note that Lemly, Andrus and Cooper (2007) describe this species as a first record for Wyoming.

 

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Sphagnum fuscum (Schimper) H. Klinggraff, Schriften Phys.-Ökon. Ges. Konigsberg 13: 4. 1872

Sphagnum acutifolium var. fuscum Schimper, Mém. Hist. Nat. Sphaignes, 64. 1857

 (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Acutifolia) unillo

 

Sphagnum acutifolium var. fuscum Schimp.

Sphagnum tenuifolium Warnst.

Sphagnum vancouveriense Warnst. (synonymy FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); the species is boreal and north to middle American states, with a corridor of absence in the southern and central plains states.

 

Porter, 1935. Fox Park, Albany County (A. Nelson, 9054), Porter, 1935. Albany Co., Porter 1937.

 

[ALBANY CO.: or Carbon?: ] Medicine Bow Mts., bogs, in Fox Park, Aven Nelson 9054 (RM), “Plants of Wyoming from the Rocky Mtn Herbarium” [printed label, annot Andrus]

 

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Sphagnum jensenii H. Lindberg, Acta Soc. Fauna Fl. Fenn. 18(3): 13. 1899 (Sphagnaceae) (section Mollusca)

 

Sphagnum annulatum var. porosum (Warnst.) W. S. G. Maas

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); there are no records reported for American States (other than Alaska) south of the border with Canada.

 

ALBANY CO.   (as Sphagnum annulatum var. porosum) Medicine bow Mts., bog below lookout west of Snowy Range, Solheim 388 (RM) July 18, 1930 [annot Andrus]

CARBON CO.   (as Sphagnum annulatum var. porosum): Medicine Bow Range between Silver Lake and Headquarters Park on Highway 130. 10,000 ft. Small pond in meadow below the road. Forming beds at edge of pond. Plants bright green, C. L. & Marjorie W. Porter 9727 (RM), Aug. 26, 1964 [annot Andrus].

 

The following additional specimens were noted by Andrus and Kosovich-Anderson (2011):

 

ALBANY CO. Medicine Bow National Forest, ca. 1 mile from trailhead of North Gap Lake Trail, growing around several small ponds located adjacent to the trail, Aug., 2001, Booth and Jackson (BING).

ALBANY CO., Medicine Bow Mountains, near Headquarters of the Park, elev. 10,500 ft (3170 m), July 29, 1934 Porter no. 1693 (CU).

CARBON CO.:  near SIlver Lake, elev. 10,400 ft. (3170 m) Aug. 15, 1962, Shushan (CANM).

CARBON CO., W slope of Snowy Range, elev. 10,000 ft (3050 m), Aug. 18, 1930, Solheim no. 388 (CU).

CARBON CO., Medicine Bow Range, NW of Silver Lake, July 10, 1960 (DUKE).

CARBON CO., Medicine Bow Mountains, North Fork of Rock Creek Fen Complex, elev. 9,600 ft. (2925 m), Sept. 22, 2007, Kosovich-Anderson no. 1725, 1754 (both BING, COLO, MO, RM).

CARBON CO. Medicine Bow Mountains, floating in an alpine stream, Aug. 11, 1953, Welch no. 15926 (CU, NY).

CARBON CO.   (as Sphagnum annulatum var. porosum): Medicine Bow Range between Silver Lake and Headquarters Park on Highway 130. 10,000 ft. Small pond in meadow below the road. Forming beds at edge of pond. Plants bright green, C. L. & Marjorie W. Porter 9727 (RM), Aug. 26, 1964 [annot Andrus].

 

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Sphagnum lindbergii Schimper, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 14: 126. 1857 (Sphagnaceae) (section Mollusca) unillo

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); the species is boreal-Canadian with outliers in New York State and New Hampshire in the east, Alaska, Washington and Colorado in the west.

 

The report of this species for Colorado “in the Flora of North America (2007). The specimen of record is actually from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming” (Weber & Wittmann (2007).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: from a geothermal fen, 8200 ft (2500 m) near headwaters of Sulphur Creek. forming mats near bubbling pools (Lemly & Cooper #887, 888, 890 (COLO, YELL, BING). “Water within the site had a pH of 3.3 to 5.1 and temperature of 17 to 23̊ C,with the most acid water being the warmest,” growing with liverworts and Drepanocladus sp.”(Lemly, Andrus & Cooper 2007). “At the eastern, downslope end of the site, it formed a continuous lawn beneath Carex aquatilis and Eriophorum angustifolium. At the western, upslope end of the site, it cocurred at the base of low hummocks in association with S[phagnum] riparium Ångstr.... The hummocks also supported a few Pinus contorta and several species of ericaceous shrubs, including Kalmia polifolia and Vaccinium scoparium.” Rare and endangered in the conterminous United States (Andrus et al. 1992).

 

[Sphagnum majus (Russow) C. E.O. Jensen in Botaniske Forening København, Festskrift, 106. 1890 subsp. majus

Sphagnum cuspidatum var. majus Russow, Arch. Naturk. Liv- Ehst- Kurlands, Ser. 2, Biol. Naturk. 7: 136. 1865  (Sphagnaceae) (section Mollusca)]  

 

Sphagnum contortum var. platyphyllum (Lindb.) Åberg

Sphagnum dusenii Russow & Warnst. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); a report for Wyoming would be a first for the western and plains states. It seems to be associated with eastern and western boreal canada and the Great Lakes provinces and states.

 

(As Sphagnum dusenii) Medicine Bow Mts., Carbon County, W.G. Solheim, 388. Det. by Andrews (Porter, 1935). (As Sphagnum dusenii) Carbon Co., Porter 1937.

 

[ Annot: from first checklist: “Excluded. (Porter, 1935; Crum 1984.) No records from Wyoming. I've looked at everything I could find and it was all S. annulatum. Sphagnum majus has actually never been collected in the western U.S. as far as I can tell. The nearest sites would be in B.C., central Alberta and Minnesota.”]

 

[Sphagnum palustre L. (Sphagnaceae)]

 

Excluded. I have yet to see any section Sphagnum from Wyoming. This species has only been found along the west coast by Andrus (in litt.).

 

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Sphagnum platyphyllum (Lindberg) Warnstorf, Flora 67: 481. 1884

Sphagnum laricinum var. platyphyllum Lindberg, Not. Sällsk.Faun. Fl. Fenn. Förh. 13: 403.  1874

(Sphagnaceae) (sect. Subsecunda) unillo

 

Sphagnum contortum var. platyphyllum (Lindb.) Åberg

Sphagnum grasslii Crum

Sphagnum laricinum var. platyphyllum Lindb. ex Braithw.,

Sphagnum subsecundum var. platyphyllum (Braithw.) Cardot

[synonymy FNA Vol. 27, 2007)].

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007). The species is boreal, western and clustered around the Great Lakes with a southern states and north-south corridore in the central plains states where it is absent.

 

Ireland, 1982. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994. Wyoming (Crum 1984). Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm, W. A. Weber B-44271 (COLO, RM), Aug. 19, 1973 [annot Andrus]. SUBLETTE CO. (as S. subsecundum var. platyphyllum), Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range, 14/viii/1989 Lake Jacqueline, ca. 9,800 ft elev. 42°57'30”N, 109°37'W; at lake edge, Richard Andrus 7778 (BING).

 

[Sphagnum recurvum P. Beauv.]

 

Excluded. All the material from the interior is referrable to S. angustifolium. Sphagnum recurvum s.str. is a coastal plain species from the East.]

 

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Sphagnum riparium Ångström, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 21: 198. 1864 (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Cuspidata) unillo

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol.27, 2007); again a boreal-Canadian distribution with some states along the Canadian border and Great Lakes states in the east.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: from a geothermal fen, 8200 ft (2500 m) near headwaters of Sulphur Creek. “Water within the site had a pH of 3.3 to 5.1 and temperature of 17 to 23̊ C,with the most acid water being the warmest,” growing with liverworts and Drepanocladus sp.”(Lemly, Andrus, & Cooper 2007). “ At the western, upslope end of the site, it occurred at the base of low hummocks in association with S[phagnum][lindbergii Lindb.]... The hummocks also supported a few Pinus contorta and several species of ericaceous shrubs, including Kalmia polifolia and Vaccinium scoparium.”  Lemly & Cooper #892, COLO, WELL, BING (Lemly, Andrus & Cooper 2007).

 

[Sphagnum robustum (Russ.) Roell.  (Sphagnaceae)]

 

This species is not reported for the North American flora area (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Leigh Lake, Teton County (Porter, 1198 & 1199), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Porter 1937.

 

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Sphagnum russowii Warnstorf, Hedwigia 25: 225. 1886. (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Acutifolia) unillo

 

Sphagnum acutifolium var robustum Russow (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); a boreal Canadian and temperate American State distribution with a southern states and a north-south central plains corridor where it is absent.

 

Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

[ALBANY CO., but probably Carbon: ] pond above headquarters Park, Medicine Bow Mts., W. [G.] Solheim [no number], July 17, 1933 (RM) [annot Andrus]

 

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Sphagnum squarrosum Crome, Samml. Deut. Laubm., 24. 1803  (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Squarrosa) unillo

 

Sphagnum squarrosum var. imbricatum Schimper

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); boreal-Canadian, temperate American States, avoiding the southern States and central plains except South Dakota. A robust Sphagnum “tyically in loose carpets in coniferous forests” (McQueen & Andrus, FNA Vol. 27, 2007). May be recognized “at a glance” by its large size and abruptly acuminate, conspicuously squarrose branch leaves (H. Crum, Moss Flora of Mexico).

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

TETON CO: Grand Teton National Park, Swan Lake, near Coulter Bay, 6,500 ft, on a floating island in the lake, with sedges and Menyanthes, C. L. Porter 7323 (RM) [annot Andrus]

 

Sphagnum subsecundum Nees in J. Sturm et al., Deutschl. Fl. 2(17): species 3. 1819  Sphagnaceae) (sect. Subsecunda) unillo

 

Sphagnum crispum R. E. Andrus (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); boreal-Canadian and temperate America with a corridor in the southern and central plains states where it is absent..

 

Crum, l984. Park Co. & Wind Rivers (BING). Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994. “seasonally flooded sites, not hummocks or higher terrain,” Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

Sphagnum subsecundum var. platyphyllum = Sphagnum platyphyllum, q.v.

 

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Sphagnum teres Ångström in C. J. Hartman, Handb. Skand Fl. ed. 8, 417. 1861

Sphagnum squarrosum var. teres Schimper, Vers. Entw.-Gesch. Torfm., 64. 1858. (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Squarrosa) unillo

 

Sphagnum teres var. squarrosulum (Schimp.) Warnst. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); boreal Canadian, temperate American states generally with a southern states and plains state’s corridor where it is absent.

 

Carbon Co., Porter 1937. Several locations (BING) Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994. “seasonally flooded sites, not hummocks or higher terrain,” Cooper & Andrus, 1994. Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Sphagnum warnstorfii Russow, Sitzungs.-Ber. Naturf.-Ges. Univ. Dorpat 8: 315. 1888   (Sphagnaceae) (sect. Acutifolia) unillo

 

 Sphagnum warnstorfianum Du Rietz (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), with a boreal, northern American states distribution.

 

Washakie Co., Porter 1937. Park Co. with Aulacomnium palustre, Campylopus schimperi (Kosovich 2011a).

 

PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm; W. A. Weber B-44272 (COLO, RM), Aug. 19, 1973. [annot Andrus].

 

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Splachnum sphaericum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 55. 1801   (Splachnaceae)

 

Splachnum ovatum Hedw.

Splachnum ovatum var. sphaericum (Hedwig) Dixon [FNA Vol. 28, 2014]

Splachnum pedunculatum Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Alberta, Wyoming, Alaska; Labrador, New Brunswick. Cited for WY in Steere, l978, The Mosses of Arctic Alaska. Strauss And Cramer, Hirschsberg, Germany. For North American citations of distribution v. Cameron, R. G. l984, Splachnum sphaericum from Isle Royale, Michigan. Bryologist 87: 349-350. Occurrence: Isle Royal, MI; Gillam, Manitoba (Crum & Schofield), Washington (Lawton), Wyoming (Steere); Gaspe, Quebec (Crum & Anderson). Widespread circumboreal. Note in this publication, the Steere citation is only repeated.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: four miles from Old Faithful east, on road to Thumb. E. Lawton 1515 (YELLO) Aug. 29, 1951.

 

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STEGONIA Venturi, Rev. Bryol. 10: 96. 1883  (Pottiaceae)

Pottia sect. Stegonia (Venturi) Müller Hal.

 

Stegonia latifolia (Schwägrichen) Venturi ex Brotherus, Laubm. Fennosk., 145. 1923

Weissia latifolia Schwägrichen in J. A. Schultes, Reise Glockner 2: 362. 1804

 

var. latifolia (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Anacalypta latifolia (Schwaegr.) Fuernr.

Pottia latifolia (Schwägr.) C. Müll. var. latifolia

Stegonia latifolia (Schwaegr.) Vent. ex Broth.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Canadian Rocky Mountains, Wyoming; Alaska, Colorado.(As Pottia latifolia var. latifolia) cited by Lawton.

 

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Stokesiella oregana (Sullivant) Robinson = Kindbergia oregana (Sullivant) Ochyra

 

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STRAMINERGON Hedenäs, J. Bryol. 17: 462. 1993  (Calliergonaceae)

 

Straminergon stramineum (Dickson ex Bridel) Hedenäs, J. Bryol. 17: 463. 1993

Hypnum stramineum Dickson ex Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 172. 1801    (Calliergonaceae)

 

Calliergon stramineum (Dickson ex Bridel) Kindberg (FNA Vol.28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Calliergon stramineum) Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

(As Calliergon stramineum:) ALBANY CO.: 10,800 ft., H. Rolston III 86091 (RM). PARK CO.: 9700 ft., Hartman 18545, (RM); W.A. Weber B-44280, 2900 msm (RM, COLO). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/4 mile SW of Barnes Lake, 9780 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°36'W. Pothole fen. Richard Andrus 8813 (BING).

 

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SYNTRICHIA Bridel, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1801(1): 299. 1801   (Pottiaceae)

 

Syntrichia caninervis Mitten, J. Proc. Linn. Soc., Bot., suppl. 1: 39. 1859 (Pottiaceae)

 

Tortula bistratosa Flowers

Tortula caninervis (Mitt.) Broth.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Tortula caninervis) Washington, Oregon, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Colorado.

 

(All as Tortula caninervis) ALBANY CO.: soil at base of a rabbit brush, 7415 ft., Vukelich Mar. 19, 1988 (BUF); Laramie Plains, 2 air mi NE of Laramie, chugwater redbeds with Astragalus, Eriogonum, Penstemon and grasses Buck 23185 (NY), also a muticous form, same collection (Buck 23188A, NY), also Artemesia scrub (Buck, 23212, NY); open prairie of Laramie Plains, ca. 2 mi. due NE of Laramie city center; chugwater redbeds; low grasses and forbs; 7,300 ft. rim of breaks. W. D. Reese 18165 (RM, LAF, BUF) June 7, 1993; Laramie Plains, 2 air miles NE of Laramie center, chugwater redbeds, rim of breaks, 7250-7300 ft. bare prairie soil between herbs, including Astragalus, Eriogonum, Penstemon, N. G. Miller 10,252 (NYS) June 7, 1993. HOT SPRINGS CO: on WY120, l mile SE of Park Co. line, SE of Meeteetse. Thin soil, roadside, Sarcobatus, Artemisia scrub, Cactus, caespitose grasses. With Pterygoneurum ovatum, P. subsessile, July 6, l985, Eckel 223686 (BUF, RM); Parsons, June 12, 1990 (BUF, RM). NIOBRARA CO: on US 85, ca. 5000 ft., 17 miles N of jct. with WY 270, road to Lance Creek. N slope, open soil. Melilotus officinalis, Cactus, Artemisia, short grasses, Tortula ruralis, July 10, l985, Eckel 871101 (BUF). PLATTE CO., PM Eckel 1320386 (RM, BUF). SUBLETTE CO.: on US191 (187), 9 miles N of border with Sweetwater Co. Open ca. N-facing slope, bunched grasses, Sage, Shadscale, Saltbush, July 5, 1985 P. M. Eckel 961251 (BUF, RM). SWEETWATER CO: on US (187) 191, 14 Mile Reservoir, US Dept. Interior, picnic area above pond and brook. Dry slope sub Sarcobatus and Artemisia tri-dentata scrub. With T. mucronifolia, Pterygoneurum July 5, l985, Eckel, No.118186 (RM).

 

(As Tortula caninervis) Note this species, which can be muticous when minute, can be tiny, minute. It differs from Tortula chisosa, not yet found in Wyoming, by its revolute leaf margins (T. chisosa's are plane). T. chisosa also has leaflike propagulae in the leaf axils (cf. Mishler, Mex. flora). When T. caninervis is miniscule, note its typical Tortula character of vivid hyaline median basal cells in sharp contrast with the rich red-green brown of the upper lamina - this is in contrast with tiny things like Aloina, Crossidium, Didymodon brachyphyllus, etc.

 

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Syntrichia norvegica F. Weber, Arch. Syst. Naturgesch. 1(1): 130, plate 5, fig. 1. 1804 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula aciphylla B.S.G.

Barbula rufipila Card. & Thér.

Syntrichia norvegica Web. in Web. & Mohr

Tortula norvegica (Web.) Wahlenb. ex Lindb.

Tortula ruralis var. alpina Wahlenb.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) but the state is within the range of the species.

 

(As Tortula norvegica) In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Yukon, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado; Manitoba, Ontario. (As Tortula aciphylla B. & S.) Mammoth, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(All as Tortula norvegica) ALBANY CO.; 8,000ft, F. J. Hermann 17720 (RM); crevices in vertical face of granite bluff on Sand Lake Rd., 1.3 miles NW of Route 130, 8500 ft. 3 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17749 (RM); Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 8 air milles NE of Laramie city center, 7850-8000 ft., on thin soil over limestone boulder, N. G. Miller 10,241 (NYS) June 7, 1993. JOHNSON CO.: Eckel 34586. PARK CO.; 3200 msm, W.A. Weber B-44311 (COLO, RM); 6400-6600 ft., 12563 (BUF, RM); 6458 ft., Nelson 12382 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO.; 4800 ft., Hartman 10645 (RM, BUF); 5400 ft., Hartman & Odasz 9403 (RM); dry soil, base granite rocks, Big Goose Creek, c. fr. March 2, 1934, Rollins 384 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: moist exposed spruce root on west shore of Lower Green River Lake, 7950 ft., Wind River Range, 50 miles N of Pinedale, F. J. Hermann 25326 (RM); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 South fork Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°34'W. On damp rock at edge of fen Richard Andrus 7835 (BING). TETON CO.: 7,000 ft, F.J. Hermann, 25549 (RM).

 

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Syntrichia papillosissima (Coppey) Loeske, Hedwigia 49: 44. 1910

Barbula papillosissima Coppey, Bull. Séances Soc. Sci. Nancy, sér. 3, 8: 314, plate 2, figs. f, g. 1908  (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula ruralis var. hirsuta Venturi

Tortula papillosissima (Copp.) Broth.

Tortula ruralis var. hirsuta (Venturi) Paris

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) although the state occurs within the range of the species.

 

(As Tortula papillosissima) PARK CO.: 6458 ft., 12381 (BUF, RM); 13071 6,000 ft. (BUF, RM).

 

[Syntrichia princeps (De Notaris) Mitten, J. Proc. Linn. Soc., Bot., suppl. 1: 39. 1859

Tortula princeps De Notaris, Mem. Reale Accad. Sci. Torino 40: 288. 1838     (Pottiaceae) Excluded]

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Tortula princeps) Hat Six Falls, Carbon County (Elisa Nelson, 5034); Sundance, Crook cos. (Aven Nelson, 2181), Porter, 1935.

 

(As Tortula princeps: )R. H. Zander (pers. comm.) determined a specimen at RM of Tortula princeps as Tortula ruralis instead (Nelson 2181, July 3, 1896), this specimen wasn't synoicous, it had no central strand in the stem; in all other respects it was T. ruralis. A specimen at RM (Hermann 17844) det. as T. princep, was also det. as T. ruralis, also Elias Nelson 5034 (RM), Aug. 7, 1898 (RM) (as T. princeps) was redet. as T. ruralis. Since I have only Porter's report, presumably based on the Carbon and Crook specimens redetermined as T. ruralis, I will probably exclude this species from the moss flora of Wyoming. ]]

 

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Syntrichia ruralis (Hedwig) F. Weber & D. Mohr, Index Mus. Pl. Crypt., [2]. 1803

Barbula ruralis Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 121. 1801        (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula laeviuscula Kindb. in Macoun

Syntrichia ruraliformis (Besch.) Dixon (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Tortula ruraliformis (Besch.) W. Ingham

Tortula ruralis (Hedw.) Gaertn., Meyer & Scherb.

 

(As Tortula ruralis) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Grand Canon, “6000 ped. alt. ster. (1449-52) (Roell 1893).

(As Tortula ruralis) In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Yukon, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado; widespread in the Middle West and in eastern North America. Common in dry situations, Albany, Carbon, [Johnson], Sublette, Sweetwater, Teton cos., [Yellowstone National Park], Porter, 1935. “Common in front of glaciers”, Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

(All as Tortula ruralis) ALBANY CO.: PM Eckel 871105 (BUF)l; ca. 4 air miles SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY 11, ca. 7800 ft., sandstone outcrops and Chugwater Red Beds, with Cerocarpus, Artemisia, and Amelanchier; on soil beneath shrubs, N.G. Miller 10,262 (NYS) June 7, 1993. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mts., 28.5 air miles E Greybull, 19.5 miles NNE Hyattville, fruit old, dehisced, with Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum, 9200 ft., B. E. Nelson, 3344, 9July1979. CARBON CO., Elias Nelson Aug. 7, 1898 (RM) (as Tortula princeps). CROOK CO., Aven Nelson, July 3, 1896 (RM) (as Tortula princeps). CROOKE CO., PM Eckel 319686 (RM, BUF). FREMONT CO., 10,300 ft., Holmes Rolston 86027 (CS); rotten wood and dry soil, Brooks Lake, To-Gwo-Tee Pass, Porter, 1613 (RM); Bridger-Teton National Forest on US26 & US287, between Moran & Dubois, ca. 9000' alpine meadow, wet with flowing streams, granite outcrops, with Encalypta vulgaris var. rhabdocarpa, Bryum caespiticium, July 6, 1985, Eckel 93081103 (BUF, RM). GOSHEN CO: Fort Laramie National Historical Site, on WY160 off US160, elevation 4230' open kept lawn, in soil around low shrubs, some seepage, gentle slope, Aug. 4, l984, P. M. Eckel with R.H. Zander 412386 (BUF, RM). LARAMIE CO., PM Eckel 1123686 (RM, BUF). LINCOLN CO: , on US189 S at jct. with US30, Diamonville town limits, ca. 6927'. Rocky dry gully in hillside, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Shadscale, Artemisia tridentata, Sego lily, Opuntia. On calcareous fine soil, w. Desmatodon systylius. Eckel 94082201 (BUF). NIOBRARA CO.: 5000 ft., PM Eckel 871103 (BUF). PARK CO.: 5000 ft., xeric, with lichens, Vukelich, April 4, 1988 (BUF); granite outcrop on bank of Crandall Creek, alt. 6500 ft., Hermann 20037, c. fr., c. calyptra falling away, c. opercula, July 19, 1965 (RM). PLATTE CO., PM Eckel 1220386 (RH). SHERIDAN CO. Hartman 10735 (RH, BUF); 6600-8000 ft., Odasz 1126 (BUF, RM); Odasz 1144 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: on US191, 21 miles N of border with Sweetwater Co. Soil, with bunched grasses, Sage, Shadscale, Saltbush. Soil under Artemisia July 5, 1985, P. M. Eckel 961252 (BUF, RM) + Tortula caninervis. WESTON CO: outskirts N of Newcastle on US85, near base of low hill above grassy scrub, arid woodland of Pinus contorta, P. ponderosa, Juniperus. Shaded, with Grimmia plagiopodia, July 10, l985, Eckel 723686 (BUF). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: low meadow along pond, 7700 ft., N shore of Yellowstone Lake, Hermann 20018 (RM); Lost Lake outlet, H. S. Conard, Grinnell, Iowa, Sept 1, 1948, 48-204 (BUF); Main Hot Spring, calcareous soil, Zander & Eckel, July 22, 1980 (BUF).

 

(As Tortula ruraliformis) PARK CO.: 6400-6600 ft., 12563 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO.; 6500 ft., Hartman 10732 (RM, BUF).

 

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TAYLORIA Hooker, J. Sci. Arts (London) 2(3): 144. 1816  (Splachnaceae)

Hookeria Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(2): 340, plate 100. 1816, not Smith 1808

 

Tayloria acuminata Hornschuch, Flora 8: 78. 1825     (Splachnaceae) unillo

 

Tayloria serrata subsp. acuminata (Hornschuch) J. J. Amann

Tayloria splachnoides subsp. acuminata (Hornschuch) Kindberg

Tayloria splachnoides var. acuminata (Hornschuch) Huebener

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014).

Crum & Anderson, 1981.

 

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Tayloria hornschuchii (Greville & Arnott) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 216[I,3]: 502. 1903

Dissodon hornschuchii Greville & Arnott, Mem. Wern. Nat. Hist. Soc. 5: 468, plate 13, figs. 34–38. 1826 (Splachnaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28., 2014).

 

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Tayloria ligulata (Dickson) Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 19. 1879

Splachnum lingulatum Dickson, Fasc. Pl. Crypt. Brit. 4: 4, plate 10, fig. 6. 1801  (Splachnaceae) unillo

 

Weissia turbinata Drummond (FNA Vol. 28, 2014]

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014).

 

PARK CO.; subalpine, 2900 msm, W.A. Weber B-44275 (COLO, RM) (NY, W. Buck, in litt.)

 

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Tayloria serrata (Hedwig) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 204. 1844

Splachnum serratum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 53, plate 8, figs. 1–3. 1801 (Splachnaceae)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, 4 miles southeast of Old Faithful and west of Divide, on damp soil, Aug. 29, 1951, c.fr., Welch 14864 (NY); on wet clay, same locale, etc., Welch 14863 (NY).

 

Leaves resemble those of Physcomitrium, large and lax with blunt teeth along the margins, this specimen strongly obovate with a sharp, reflexed cusp at the apex. The fruit is critical in determining this species.

 

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TETRAPHIS Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 43. 1801  (Tetraphidaceae)

Georgia Müller Hal.

 

Tetraphis pellucida Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 45, plate 7, fig. 1a–f. 1801 (Tetraphidaceae)

 

Georgia pellucida (Hedw.) Rabenh.

Tetraphis cuspidata (Kindb.) Paris

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

“In all states .. of the Pacific Northwest..widespread in the Middle West...” Jenny Lake Teton Co. (Porter, 1225), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

TETON CO.; 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25571, (RM) c.fr. Aug. 29, 1973.

 

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Tetraphis pellucida Hedw. var. pellucida (Tetraphidaceae)

 

  Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Tetraphis pellucida var. trachypoda (Kindberg) J. Harpel, Sida 22: 551. 2006

Georgia trachypoda Kindberg, Rev. Bryol. 20: 93. 1893 (Tetraphidaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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THUIDIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 157, plates 481–486. 1852  (Thuidiaceae)

 

Thuidium abietinum (Hedw.) Schimp. in B.S.G. = Abietinella abietina (Hedw.) Fleisch.

 

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Thuidium recognitum (Hedwig) Lindberg, Not. Sällsk. Fauna Fl. Fenn. Förh. 13: 416. 1874 (as Thuyidium)

Hypnum recognitum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 261. 1801  (Thuidiaceae)

 

Hypnum protensum Michaux

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

The absence of this species “from western North America is nearly complete except for an arc of distribution that extends from eastern North America into the high Arctic thence southward in the mountainso from Alaska and British Columbia barely reaching Washington State’ (Norris & Shevock 2004). From an ecological community that “is generally characterized by high bryophyte diversity and abundance, creating for Wyoming an unusual picture of a northern boreal forest with bryophyte coverage up to 100%, dominated by typical luxuriant forms of Hylocomium splendens combined with Aulacomnium palustre, Climacium dendroides, Helodium blandowii, Rhizomnium spp., Thuidium recognitum, Marchantia alpestris, and others “ (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

PARK CO.: SNF, Beartooth Plateau; Lily Lake shore, wet spruce forest, Picea sp. - Alnus incana - Linnaea borealis + Equisetum variegatum - Bryidae, under recently fallen spruce, on wet litter and humus, locally abundant T57N R107W S6, 44*56.880-890’N, 109*42.930-940’W, elev. ca. 7,700 ft (2350 m), 17 Aug. 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 3047 (COLO, MO).

 

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TIMMIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 176. 1801  (Timmiaceae)

 

Timmia austriaca Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 176, plate 42, figs. 1–7. 1801 (Timmiaceae) unillo

 

Timmia arctica Kindb.

Timmia austriaca var. arctica (Kindb.) Arnell

Timmia austriaca var. brevifolia Ren. & Card.

Timmia austriaca var. papillosa Hesselbo (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Timmia polytrichoides var. lutescens Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, sterile (1526) (Roell 1893).

Laramie Peak, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 1645); Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5174); Wolf Creek, Sheridan County (Aven Nelson, 2324), [Carbon, Crook, (as var. brevifolia R. & C., Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 5913)], Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: Aven Nelson Aug. 22, 1897 (RM); 8500 ft., F.J. Hermann 17779 (RM). BIG HORN CO.: Nelson 4543 (RH, BUF), 7200'; Big Horn Mtns., c. 33.5 air mi. ESE of Grey-bull, c. 11.5 mi. NE of Hyattville, S of Paint Rock Lakes. Under Engelmann Spruce-Sub alpine Fir. Elev. 8600 ft., Aug. 9, 1979, B.E. Nelson 4942 (RH, BUF),8600 ft.; CARBON CO.: 9000 ft. F.J. Hermann 17801 (RM). FREMONT CO.: 8400 ft., F. J. Hermann 25514 (RM). JOHNSON CO.: (var. brevifolia) 5600-6000 ft., Odasz 1261 (BUF, RM). PARK CO.: 6000 ft., Vukelich April 1, 1988 (BUF); (var. brevifolia) 6800-7400 ft., c. fr., No H 22063 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO.: Aven Nelson July 12, 1896 (RM); Odasz, 1029, 5200 - 7200 ft. (BUF, RM); (var. brevifolia) 5200-7200 ft., Odasz 1030 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: F.J. Hermann 25332 (RM). WASHAKIE CO.: (var. brevifolia) Big Horn Mts; along Canyon Creek ca. 6.7 air mi W of Hazelton Pyramid, mixed conifer forest, 8000 ft., Nelson & Fonken, No 7315, Aug. 17, 1980 (BUF, RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Aven & Elias Nelson - Holzinger 5913 (RM).

 

The var. brevifolia is not recognized in the 1990 checklist. Note: One probably shouldn't recognize var. brevifolia: all specimens appear to be between 4 and 6 mm in leaf length: perhaps this is the typical size. Timmia megapolitana in the field resembles more a Polytrichum with rather erect, non contorted leaves which are inrolled (Polytrichum has multicellular filaments on the costa and a tympanum across the mouth of the capsule). Timmia has peristome teeth with an inner peristome of 64 cilia; the capsules are inclined).

 

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Timmia megapolitana Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 176. 1801   (Timmiaceae)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007); note the subsp. megapolitana is not reported for Wyoming in FNA Vol. 27, 2007.

 

Wood's Creek, Albany Co. (Porter, 670); Beaver Creek, Weston County (Aven Nelson, 9459), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: PM Eckel 871111 (RM, BUF). var. megapolitana (cells greater than 9 µm, autoicous); Laramie Mtns, Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie; limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck 23153 (NY), c. fr. young, lid fast shut June 7, 1993, ripe in early July?; along Roger Canyon in the Laramie Mtns, 7 mi. due NE of Laramie city center, Artemesia scrub vegetation; limestone cliffs and outcrops, ca. 7,600 ft. on limestone cliff, W. D. Reese 18148 (LAF) June 7, 1993. SHERIDAN CO.: 6600-8000 feet, Odasz 1132 (BUF, RM); Big Horn Mts., forested valley through Chugwater redbeds and limestone outcrops, and forest margin, 4800 ft., Hartman 10649, c. fr. Aug. 3, 1979 (BUF, RM).

 

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subsp. megapolitana

 

Timmia cucullata Michaux [FNA Vol. 27, 2007]

 

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subsp. bavarica (Hessler)  Brassard, Lindbergia 10: 34. 1984

Timmia bavarica Hessler, De Timmia, 19, fig. 3. 1822    unillo

 

Timmia megapolitana var. bavarica (Hessler) Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Timmia bavarica Hesel.) The common species in the southern part of the State. Telephone Canyon, Albany Co. (Porter, 1456); Pole Mountain, Albany County (Porter, 666); Rogers Canyon, Albany County (Porter, 670), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8500 ft., F.J. Hermann 17757 1/2 (RM); Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 7 air miles NE of Laramie city center, limestone outcrops with Cerocarpus montanus, Artemisia cava, A. tripartita, A. nova, A. tridentata; aspen grove below bluff, on soil, N. G. Miller 10,237 (NYS) June 7, 1993. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mts., 8600-8800 ft, on limestone, Odasz 731 c. fr. (BUF, RM). PARK CO.: 6900-7800 ft., 21049, c. fr. (BUF, RM); 6900-7800 ft., c. fr. H 21026 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO., 8400 ft., B. E. Nelson, K. Dueholm 3757 (RM, BUF).

 

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TOMENTYPNUM Loeske, Deutsche Bot. Monatsschr. 22: 82. 1911   (Amblystegiaceae) [note: not Tomenthypnum]

 Camptothecium sect. Tomentella Kindberg; Homalothecium subg. Tomentypnum (Loeske) H. Robinson

 

Tomentypnum nitens (Hedwig) Loeske, Deutsche Bot. Monatsschr. 22: 82. 1911 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum nitens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 255. 1801

 

Camptothecium nitens (Hedw.) Schimp.

Homalothecium nitens (Hedw.) Robins.

Tomenthypnum nitens (Hedw.) Loeske var. involutum (Limpricht) C. E. O. Jensen

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (Lawton). (As Camptothecium nitens (Schreb.) Schimp. sec. Crum et al. l973. (As Camptothecium nitens (Schreb.) Schimp.) Albany County (Porter, 937, 942 & 1421), Porter, 1935. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

PARK CO.: calcareous bog, 6700 ft., R.L.Hartman No.18547 (RM); Beartooth Plateau, 2900 msm, W. A. Weber B-44285 (COLO, RM); Beartooth Lake, south slope, alt. 9,000 ft., Boggy area, Eula Whitehouse 27444 (US); wet soil, in calcareous white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1730 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. SHERIDAN CO.: on vertical rock face, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-019, June 16, 1992 (RM), with Encalypta vulgaris var. vulgaris. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake. Richard Andrus 7794 (BING).

 

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TORTELLA (Lindberg) Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 1: 599. 1888, name conserved   (Pottiaceae)

Mollia subgen. Tortella Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 21. 1879

 

Tortella alpicola Dixon, Ann. Bryol. 3: 54. 1929 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Tortella fragilis var. tortelloides (S. W. Greene) R. H. Zander & Hoe

Tortella tortelloides (S. W. Greene) H. Robinson

 

Wyoming (Eckel 1997).

 

(All as Tortella tortelloides:) FREMONT CO.: limestone outcrop, Douglas fir slope, 1/2 mile E. of Horse Creek Campground, alt. 7800 ft., Absaroka Range, 11 miles N Dubois, Aug. 28, 1973, F. J. Hermann 25530 (with Pseudoleskella tectorum, Gymnostomum aeruginosum) (WTU) [see paper, Eckel, in The Bryologist]. A duplicate specimen of Hermann 25530 in RM did not contain a specimen of T. tortelloides. SHERIDAN CO.: Moist limestone, on vertical rock face with Trentepolia (agla), Bighorn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-018, June 16, 1992 (BUF, RM); same area, in crevices of rock ridge faces, limestone, Section 15, McKee 92-046, June 24, 1992 (BUF, RM), with Encalypta vulgaris, Mnium blyttii, Orthotrichum jamesianum, Pseudoleskeella tectorum, Tortula norvegica, Tortula mucronifolia.

 

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Tortella fragilis (Hooker & Wilson) Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 1: 606. 1888

Didymodon fragilis Hooker & Wilson in T. Drummond, Musc. Amer., 127. 1828 (as fragile)   (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula fragilis (Hook. & Wils.) B.S.G.

Mollia fragilis (Hook. & Wils.) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Nevada; Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, Ontario; Greenland, Quebec, New England, New Jersey.

 

ALBANY CO.; 10,000 ft, Medicine Bow Mts., F.J. Hermann 17222 (NY, RM); along Roger Canyon, Laramie Mtns., 7 miles due NE of Laramie, Artemesia scrub; limestone cliffs, 7,600 ft., crack in limestone cliff, Reese 18163A (LAF, BUF); thin soil on low basalt boulder, shore of rocky pond 1 mile S of Brooklyn Lake, alt. 10,000 ft., Snowy Range, Medicine Bow Mts, 9 miles W of Centennial Aug. 22, 1961, F. J. Hermann 17222 (MICH); Medicine Bow National Forest, Snowy Range, T16N R79W S17, Libby and Lewis Lakes vicinities (near Sugarloaf Campground area), slope facing the north, alpine tundra, on open dry gravelly soil; associated with Encalypta sp.; not abundant, elev. 10800 Ft., Sept. 16, 2007, Y.I. Kosovich-Anderson no. 1604 (MO). PARK CO.; 3250 msm, Weber, W.A. B-44263 (COLO, RM) Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; alpine bogs of east summit, east slope, head of Wyoming Creek, 3250 msm (COLO); west of Bear Tooth Butte, Crazy Creek campground, Aug. 22, 1963, E. Lawton, 2027 (NY, WTU); Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Hwy; alpine bogs of east summit, east slope, head of Wyoming Creek, 3250 msm, Weber B- 44263 (COLO) Aug. 19, 1973. TETON CO.: Hidden Falls along the E shore of Jenny Lake, on soil near falls, 6600-7100 ft., P. L. Redfearn 11713 (MO) Aug. 12, 1962

 

[Tortella humilis (Hedwig) Jennings, Man. Mosses W. Pennsylvania, 96. 1913

Barbula humilis Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 116, plate 25, figs. 1–4. 1801 (Pottiaceae)

 

Barbula caespitosa Schwägrichen

Tortella caespitosa (Schwägrichen) Limpricht (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007). It appears to be an eastern species.

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985.]

 

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Tortella tortelloides (S. W. Greene) H. Robinson  = Tortella alpicola Dixon

 

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Tortella tortuosa (Hedwig) Limpricht, Laubm. Deutschl. 1: 604. 1888

Tortula tortuosa Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 124. 1801

var. tortuosa (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula tortuosa (Hedw.) Web. & Mohr

Mollia tortuosa (Hedw.) Lindb.

Trichostomum tortuosum (Hedw.) Dix.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Nevada, Utah, Colorado; South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Ontario; Nova Scotia and Quebec to North Carolina. Hoback Canyon, Teton Co. (Porter, 1166 & 1169), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

CROOK CO.: Black Hills: 6.4 km N-NE of Warrens Peaks, along Beaver Creek. Betula-Pinus woods, moss, rather exposed on soil covered rock. S. P. Churchill 8734b (MO) May 21, 1977. SHERIDAN CO.: 6600 - 8000 ft., Odasz 1172 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO. 6600-8000 ft., T58N, R90W Sec. 30, Odasz no. 1084 (MO, RM). PARK CO: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; alpine bogs of east summit, east slope, head of Wyoming Creek, 3250 msm, W. A. Weber B- 44263 (MO) Aug. 19, 1973 [as T. arctica].

 

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TORTULA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 122. 1801, name conserved  (Pottiaceae)

Desmatodon Bridel; Phascum Hedwig; Pottia (Reichenbach) Fürnrohr; Protobryum J. Guerra &

M. J. Cano

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Tortula caninervis (Mitt.) Broth. = Syntrichia caninervis Mitten

 

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Tortula cernua (Huebener) Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 20. 1879

Dermatodon [sic] cernuus Huebener, Muscol. Germ., 117. 1833   unillo

 

Cynodontium latifolium Schwaegr.

Desmatodon camptothecius Kindb. in Macoun

Desmatodon cernuus (Hueb.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G.

Tortula cernua (Hueb.) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon cernuus) British Columbia, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Yukon, Nevada, Utah, Colorado; Manitoba, Wisconsin, Ontario; Greenland, Newfoundland, Quebec, Ohio. Wyoming, Flowers 1973.

 

(All as Desmatodon cernuus) ALBANY CO.: 8500 ft., F.J. Hermann 17105 (RM), fr. August 17, 1961; northwest base of Sheep Mtn. along Wy Rte. 11; ca. 4 miles due ESE of Centennial, ca. 7,750 ft, fen with low forest of Populus, Betula, Salix in shallow water, a “hanging bog” on steep hillside, hummock under trees, W. D. Reese 18175 (LAF) June 7, 1993 with Desmatodon cernuus. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Lower Falls, Yellowstone River, Bartley & Pontious Aug. 21, 1938 (RM); Soda Butte, Aug. 19, 1953, c. fr., E. Lawton 1905 (WTU).

 

When I first saw a specimen of this species I thought it was a Bryum because of the large, thick walled, square to short rectangular, smooth upper cells, the apiculus or cusped leaf tip, but especially the border. The capsule was zygomorphic, however, and especially the teeth were coarsely papillose and pronged - unlike the delicate teeth with their sprinkles of minute papillae of Bryum. The long, delicate basal cells did not appear to be bryaceous. The capsule forbids Funariaceae or Splachnaceae (due to a sort of flaccid character of the leaf). A cross section of the leaf produced a distinctive Pottiaceous appearance with thick walled stereid cells dorsal to larger guides and epidermal cells, confluent with the laminal cells. Even though the cells were smooth walled, some were papillose near the costa, but really only detectable in section. You could have knocked me over to find it was a Desmatodon, and that definitely D. cernuus. In the future, look for the distinctive arched capsule. Sometimes, however, the capsule is shorter and more globose and the arcing is not apparent. The nice contrast between thick, squarrose upper cells and the long, flaccid, delicate cells of the base is distinctive, rather suggestive of Tortula in a vague sort of way.

 

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Tortula guepinii (Bruch & Schimper) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 214[I,3]: 430. 1902

Desmatodon guepinii Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 58, plate 133. 1843  (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon guepinii) PARK CO.: 6400-6600 ft., 12567 (BUF, RM).

 

Tortula guepinii is smaller than T. hoppeana, with leaves less than 2 mm, “and cells of the leaf margin are distinctly less papillose at the apexa” (Zander & Eckel, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Tortula hoppeana (Schultz) Ochyra, Bryologist 107: 499. 2005

Trichostomum hoppeanum Schultz in C. F. Hornschuch, Syll. Pl. Nov. 2: 140. 1828 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

 (In Lawt. var. muticus (Brid.) Brid. is given with a Wyoming citation. Crum et al., 1973 reduce this var. to forma. Lawton's synonymy is: Desmatodon latifolius var. muticus (Brid.) Brid.)

Bryum piliferum Dicks.

Desmatodon latifolius var. muticus (Brid.) Brid. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Desmatodon glacialis Funck ex Brid.

Desmatodon latifolius (Hedw.) Brid. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Desmatodon latifolius var. pilifer (Dicks.) Rabenh.

Dicranum latifolium var. muticum Brid.

Tortula eucalyptrata Lindb. (FNA (2007)

Trichostomum euryphylla R. H. Zander (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

(As Desmatodon latifolius) Washington, Oregon, Alberta, Idaho, Wyoming; California, Nevada, Colorado; Quebec.

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Colorado; Quebec.

 

(As Desmatodon latifolius var. glacialis Schimp.) Nash's Fork, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7810); Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 1835) and Elias Nelson, 5234); Bridger Peak, Carbon Co. (Goodding, 1965).

Elias Nelson's 5234 was determined by Holzinger as Barbula amplexa Lesq., and was so reported by Dr. Nelson (1900). Mr. E. B. Bartram is to be thanked for the correction,” Porter, 1935). “Common in front of glaciers”, Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(All as Desmatodon latifolius) No county, Nelson #2865b (RM). CARBON-ALBANY CO.: (Desmatodon latifolius var. muticus), Aven Nelson, 7810 (RM). ALBANY CO.: Nash's Fork, under spruce trees, 9000 ft., Nelson no 7810, c. fr. & calyptrae July 29, 1900 (TENN); La Plata Mines, 10,000 ft., on soil, in wet places, Nelson 5234 (TENN) (muticous form). CARBON CO.: Medicine Bow Mts. var. latifolius, 9600-10,000 ft., ??? 20730 (RM, BUF); var. latifolius, rotted wood in soil in lodgepole pine woods along Trail Creek, Sand Lake Rd., alt. 9000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 4.5 miles SW Morgan, Aug. 6, 1962, c.fr., F. J. Hermann 17813 (WTU), (var. muticus) Medicine Bow Mts., 2.3 mi. above French Creek, Aug. 11, 1953, c. fr., E. Lawton 1705 (WTU); var. muticus. F. J. Hermann 17187 (RM). var muticus: Nash's Fork, Medicine Bow Mts., Aven Nelson, 7810 (RM). PARK CO.: road from Bear Tooth Lodge to Red Lodge, east of summit near small glacial lake at 10500 ft., c. fr. Aug. 21, 1953, E. Lawton 1967 (WTU). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 Near Bell Lakes 10,100 ft. elev. 42°58'N, 109°35'W. var. muticus, with Polytrichum juniperinum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Pohlia nutans. Richard Andrus 7861 (BING).

 

Note that the variety muticus has the costa ending before the apex, but with an apiculus or short awn made of laminal cells!

 

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Tortula inermis (Bridel) Montagne, Arch. Bot. (Leipzig) 1: 136. 1832

Syntrichia subulata var. inermis Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 581. 1826 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Syntrichia  inermis (Brid.) Bruch

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming; California, Arizona, Utah. Wyoming, Flowers 1973. Dry limestone rock crevices, Telephone Canyon, Albany Co. (Porter, 1272), Porter, 1935.

 

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Tortula leucostoma (R. Brown) Hooker & Greville, Edinburgh J. Sci. 1: 294. 1824

Barbula leucostoma R. Brown, Chlor. Melvill., 40. 1823 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula leucostoma R. Br. (FNA 2007)

Desmatodon leucostoma (R.Br.) Berggr. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Desmatodon obliquus B.S.G.,

Desmatodon suberectus (Hook.) Limpr. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Tortula suberecta Hook. in Drumm. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon leucostoma) [No county]: Big Horn National Forest, Prune Creek, Aug. 30, 1951, E. Whitehouse (WTU). SUBLETTE CO.: On steep, gravelly, peaty open slope above west shore of Lower Green River Lake, alt. 7950 ft., Wind River Range, 50 miles N of Pinedale, June 19, 1973, c.fr., F. J. Hermann 25339 (WTU).

 

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Tortula mucronifolia Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(1): 136, plate 34. 1811 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado; Minnesota, Iowa, Ontario; Greenland, New England, New York. Albany, Carbon cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO., dry sandy soil, Porter #1751 (RM); Porter, C.L. #1697 (NY, RM); NW base of Sheep Mtn. sandstone outcrops and chugwater redbeds with Artemesia dominant (Buck, 23221, NY), fruit old, peristomes eroding, June 7, 1993. CROOK CO.: Devil's Tower Natl. Mon., open Pinus ponderosa-Quercus woods, May 22, 1977, Churchill 8814 c.fr. (NY). PARK CO., 6500ft, F.J. Hermann 20040 1/2 (RM). SWEETWATER CO: on US (187) 191, at 14 Mile Reservoir, picnic area, US Dept. of Interior, dry slopes above pond, Sarcobatus, Artemisia tridentata scrub. With Pterygoneurum subsessile, T. caninervis, July 5, l985, Eckel 318186 (BUF). SHERIDAN CO.; Hartman 10735, 6500'; 4,800 ft. 10591 M (BUF, RM).

 

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Tortula norvegica (Web.) Wahlenb. ex Lindb. = Syntrichia norvegica F. Weber

 

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Tortula obtusifolia (Schwägrichen) Mathieu, Fl. Gén. Belgique 2: 48. 1853

Barbula obtusifolia Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl 1(1): 129, plate 31. 1811   (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Desmatodon arenaceus Sull. in Gray

Desmatodon coloradensis Grout

Desmatodon obtusifolius (Schwaegr.) Schimp.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon obtusifolius) British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico; South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas, Manitoba, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Ontaro; Quebec, New Jersey, Ohio, Tennessee.

 

(As Desmatodon obtusifolius) Weston Co., Wynne, 1943.

 

(As Desmatodon obtusifolius) WESTON CO., PM Eckel 1023686 (RM, BUF). ? Co., Kofa Mts., L.N. Goodding March 22, l939 (RM). ]]

 

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Tortula papillosissima (Copp.) Broth. = Syntrichia papillosissima (Coppey) Loeske

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Tortula princeps De Not. = Syntrichia princeps (DeNotaris) Mitt.

 

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Tortula plinthobia (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pfanzenfam. 214[I,3]: 430. 1902

Desmatodon plinthobius Sullivant & Lesquereux in A. Gray, Manual ed. 2, 628. 1856 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

 

Not reported for Wyoming, although the state is within the range of the species and should be expected (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon plinthobius) Rochelle Hills, Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

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[Tortula porteri (James) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 214[I,3]: 430. 1902

Desmatodon porteri James in C. F. Austin, Musci Appalach., 123. 1870    [excluded]

 

Desmatodon  fisherae H. A. Crum

 

Not reported for Wyoming. The species occurs in eastern North America (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon porteri ) Cummins, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1538, in part), Porter, 1937. [Actually in the dissertation it only says Albany County on p. 35.]]

 

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Tortula ruraliformis (Besch.) Ingh. = Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F. Weber & D. Morr

 

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Tortula ruralis (Hedw.) Gaertn., Meyer & Scherb. = Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F. Weber & D. Morr

 

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Tortula systylia (Schimper) Lindberg, Musc. Scand., 20. 1879

Desmatodon systylius Schimper, Flora 28: 145. 1845 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon systylius) Canadian Rocky Mountains, Wyoming; California; Newfoundland. LINCOLN CO: on US189 S at jct. with US30, Diamonville town limits, ca. 6927'. Rocky dry gully in hillside, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Shadscale, Artemisia tridentata, Sego lily, Opuntia. On calcareous fine soil, c.fr. July 4, 1985, with Tortula ruralis, Eckel 94082200 (BUF, RM).

 

Note that in the Lincoln Co. specimen the capsule variation is strongly reminiscent of that of [Hennediella  heimii], the setae are some long, some short, the capsules are some broad and dark, others seem thin and light - perhaps this is just the last season and the present. The gametophytes when not bleached yellow-orange are a fresh green, bright because they are not papillose like Pterygoneurum which is more dull, sordid brownish orange and green. Note the latter genus often has rough awns: D. systylius has smooth awns. This species also has the distinctive areolation of the group, lax, thin-walled, gradual transition from basal cells to those of the limb - a more delicate overall appearance.

 

Tortula systylia may be confused with Stegonia but the latter has a distinct triangle of echlorophyllose cells at the apex of the much broader leaves. It is similar also to T. hoppeana, but the laminal cells [of T. systylius] are smooth” (Zander & Eckel, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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TRICHOSTOMUM Bruch, Flora 12: 396. 1829, name conserved    (Pottiaceae)

Oxystegus (Limpricht) Hilpert; Paraleptodontium D. G. Long; Trichostomum subg. Crispuliformes

(Kindberg) R. H. Zander; Trichostomum subg. Oxystegus Limpricht

 

Trichostomum tenuirostre (Hooker & Taylor) Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 21: 225. 1864

Weissia tenuirostris Hooker & Taylor, Muscol. Brit. ed. 2, 83. 1827   new to Wyoming [March 20 2010]

(Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Weissia tenuirostris Hook. & Tayl.

Weissia cylindrica Bruch ex Brid.

Trichostomum cylindricum (Brush ex Brid.) C.. M.

Didymodon trachyneuron Kindb.

Oxystegus cylindricus (Brid.) Hilp.

Oxystegus tenuirostris (Hook. & Tayl.) A. J. E. Smith

  [synonymy after Crum & Anderson 1981]

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

  While thumbing through the first volume of the mosses of Eastern North America it was noticed that the chromosome number (n=13) of this species was determined from a specimen from Wyoming (p. 303). The species has a disjunctive distribution between the east and western coasts of North America. It is reported from Colorado  in "alpine tundra, and at compensating environments on north faces of lower canyon walls." (Weber & Wittmann 2007).

 

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WARNSTORFIA Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 310. 1907  (Calliergonaceae)

 

Warnstorfia exannulata (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Loeske = Sarmentypnum exannulatum (Schimper) Hedenäs

 

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Warnstorfia fluitans (Hedw.) Loeske (Hedwig) Loeske, Hedwigia 46: 310. 1907 var. fluitans (Calliergonaceae)

Hypnum fluitans Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 296. 1801

 

Drepanocladus. fluitans var. falcatus (C. E. O. Jensen) G. Roth;

Drepanocladu fluitans var. setiformis (Renauld) Mönkemeyer

Drepanocladus fluitans var. uncatus H. A. Crum, Steere & L. E. Anderson

Warnstorfia fluitans var. falcata (C. E. O. Jensen) H. A. Crum & L. E. Anderson (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Drepanocladus berggrenii (C. Jens.) G. Roth

Drepanocladus fluitans (Hedw.) Warnst.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Hypnum fluitans L.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1574-75, 1581) (Roell 1893); as f. depauperata [sic]: Yellowstone National Park (1552) (Roell 1893).

[All as Drepanocladus fluitans (Hedw.) Warnst.] Snake River, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 6485), Porter, 1935. Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. [Both of these are probably Nelson 6485 redetermined by me as D. exannulatus, q.v. Wynne, 1944.

 

SHERIDAN CO.: dominant species in sunnier areas, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-011, with Distichium capillaceum, Hylocomium splendens (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 South fork Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°34'W. In small fen, with Amblystegium riparium Richard Andrus 7827 (BING). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: in a woodland pool, Snake River, Aven & Elias Nelson 6485 (RM) exsiccat Plants of Yell. Nat. Pk. det. Holzinger.

 

There is a var. falcata (Sanio ex C. Jens.) Crum & Anderson in the 1990 checklist but “Variety falcata (Drepanocladus fluitans var. uncatus) has been recognized, but because no type material seems to be extant, the status of this taxon cannot be evaluated” (Hedenas, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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Warnstorfia pseudostraminea (Müller Hal.) Tuomikoski & T. J. Koponen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 16: 223. 1979 (Calliergonaceae)

Hypnum pseudostramineum Müller Hal., Bot. Zeitung (Berlin) 13: 502. 1855 (as pseudo-stramineum);

 

Calliergidium pseudostramineum (Müller Hal.) Grout

Calliergidium pseudostramineum var. hoveyi Grout

Calliergidium pseudostramineum var. plesistramineum (Renauld) Grout

Drepanocladus pseudostramineus (Müller Hal.) G. Roth

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

-----

WEISSIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 64. 1801  (Pottiaceae)

Astomum Hampe; Hymenostomum R. Brown; Weissia sect. Astomum (Hampe) Müller Hal.; Weissia

subg. Astomum (Hampe) Kindberg; Weissia subg. Hymenostomum (R. Brown) Andrews

 

Weissia controversa Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 67. 1801  ;    (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Gymnostomum rauanum Austin

Mollia viridula (Withering) Lindberg

Weissia andrewsii E. B. Bartram

Weissia brandegeei Austin

Weissia controversa var. australis (Austin) Schornherst

Weissia controversa var. longiseta (Lesquereux & James) H. A. Crum, Steere & L. E. Anderson

Weissia controversa var. wolffii (Lesquereux & James) H. A. Crum, Steere & L. E. Anderson

Weissia curvicaulis Bridel

Weissia longiseta Lesquereux & James

Weissia microodonta Hedwig

Weissia viridula var. nitida Renauld & Cardot

Weissia wolfii Lesquereux & James

Weissia convoluta of authors non C.M. & Kindb. sec. Grout, Moss Fl. N. Am. vol. 1(3): p.156, 1938.

Weissia wolfii Lesq. & James

 

Not noted for Wyoming in FNA Vol. 27, 2007.

 

(As Weisia wolfii L. & J.) Mammoth and Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935. (As Weisia convoluta C. M. & Kindb.) Yellowstone Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, Smiley 46 (YELLO) has been determined to be Dicranoweisia crispula (q.v.), as is 93, and 150 (YELLO).

 

APPENDIX I: list of families, their genera and the number of species reported for Wyoming.

 

Wyoming

 

Amblystegiaceae

  Amblystegium (1)

  Calliergon (3)

  Calliergonella (1)

  Campyliadelphus (1)

  Campylium (2)

  Campylophyllum (1)

  Conardia (1)

  Cratoneuron (1)

  Drepanocladus (3)

  Hygroamblystegium (2)

  Hygrohypnum (7)

  Leptodictyum (1)

  Palustriella (1)

  Platydictya (1)

  Pseudocalliergon (3)

  Sanionia (2)

  Tomenthyprnum (1)

Andreaeaceae

  Andreaea (1)

Aulacomniaceae

  Aulacomnium (2)

Bartramiaceae

  Anacolia (1)

  Bartramia (1)

  Philonotis (3)

Brachytheciaceae

  Brachytheciastrum (5)

  Brachythecium (11)

  Eurhynchiastrum (1)

  Homalothecium (3)

  Kindbergia (1)

  Sciuro-hypnum (4)

Bryaceae

  Bryum (2)

  Gemmabryum (2)

  Imbribryum (2)

  Plagiobryoides (1)

  Plagiobryum (1)

  Ptychostomum (14)

  Rosulabryum (2)

Buxbaumiaceae

  Buxbaumia (2)

Calliergonaceae

  Sarmentypnum (3)

  Scorpidium (2)

  Straminergon (1)

  Warnstorfia (2)

Climaciaceae

  Climacium (2)

Dicranaceae

  Campylopus (3)

  Cynodontium (5)

  Dichodontium (2)

  Dicranella (4)

  Dicranoweisia (2)

  Dicranum (11)

  Oncophorus (2)

  Paraleucobryum (1)

Ditrichaceae

  Ceratodon (1)

  Distichium (2)

  Ditrichum (2)

  Saelania (1)

Encalyptaceae

  Encalypta (5)

Fissidentacea

  Fissidens (6)

Fontinalaceae

  Dichelyma (2)

  Fontinalis (3)

Funariaceae

  Funaria (2)

  Physcomitrium (2)

Grimmiaceae

  Bucklandiella (1)

  Coscinodon (1)

  Grimmia (14)

  Jaffueliobryum (1)

  Niphotrichum (3)

  Racomitrium (

  Schistidium (8)

Hedwigiaceae

  Hedwigia (1)

Helodiaceae

  Elodium (1)

Hylocomiaceae

  Hylocomium (1)

  Pleurozium (1)

  Rhytidiadelphus (1)

Hypnaceae

  Hypnum (6)

  Isopterygiopsis (1)

  Platygyrium (1)

  Ptilium (1)

  Pylaisia (1)

Leskeaceae

  Pseudoleskea (4)

  Pseudoleskeella (2)

Meesiaceae

  Amblyodon (1)

  Leptobryum (1)

  Meesia (1)

  Paludella (1)

Mielichhoferiaceae

  Pohlia (13)

Mniaceae

  Cinclidium (1)

  Mnium (7)

  Plagiomnium (7)

  Rhizomnium (4)

Neckeraceae

  Neckera (1)

Orthotrichaceae

  Amphidium (1)

  Orthotrichum (14)

Plagiotheciaceae

  Plagiothecium (2)

Polytrichaceae

  Atrichum (2)

  Meiotrichum (1)

  Pogonatum (1)

  Polytrichastrum (4)

  Polytrichum (6)

Pottiaceae

  Barbula (2)

  Bryoerythrophyllum (1)

  Didymodon (8)

  Gymnostomum (1)

  Hennediella (1)

  Hymenostylium (1)

  Pterygoneurum (2)

  Stegonia (1)

  Syntrichia (4)

  Tortella (3)

  Tortula (9)

  Trichostomum (1)

  Weissia (1)

Pterigynandraceae

  Heterocladium (1)

  Myurella (1)

  Pterygynandrum (1)

Rhytidiaceae

  Rhytidium (1)

Roellobryaceae

  Roellobryon (1)

Scouleriaceae

  Scouleria (1)

Seligeriaceae

  Blindia (1)

  Seligeria (1)

Sphagnaceae

  Sphagnum (15)

  sect. Acutifolia (4)

  sect. Cuspidata (1)

  sect. Mollusca (4)

  sect. Squarrosa (2)

  sect. Subsecunda (3)

Splachnaceae

  Splachnum (1)

 Tayloria (4)

Tetraphidaceae

  Tetraphis (1)

Timmiaceae

  Timmia (2)

Thuidiaceae

  Abietinella (1)

  Thuidium (1)

 

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