Revised State and County Checklist of the Mosses of Wyoming, U.S.A. A–L.

P. M. Eckel

Res Botanica

1-MossesWyoIntro.htm

August 22, 2013

 

 

REVISED STATE AND COUNTY CHECKLIST OF

THE MOSSES OF WYOMING, U.S.A.:

A–L

 

 

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ABIETINELLA Müller Hal., Nuovo Giorn. Bot. Ital., n. s. 3: 115. 1896 

    Thuidium sect. Abietina Schimper; Thuidium subg. Abietinella (Müller Hal.) Brotherus  (Thuidiaceae).

 

Abietinella abietina (Hedwig) M. Fleischer, Musc. Buitenzorg 4: 1497. 1923

Hypnum abietinum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 353 [added post-publ.]. 1801.

 

Thuidium abietinum (Hedw.) B.S.G.

 

Wyoming; “Unlike Thuidium, Abietinella is papillose on both leaf surfaces rather than just the back” (Buck in FNA, Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Hawk’s Ranch, Colorado-Wyoming State line, Albany County (Aven Nelson, in 1930); Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (collector unknown), Porter, 1935.

 

JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn Mts., 5500 ft. Odasz 1217 (BUF, RM). PARK CO.: 6000 ft. ??? 13064 (RM, BUF); 6300-6900 ft., 21985 (BUF, RM). SHERIDAN CO.: Mineral soil, conifer litter, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 28, McGee 92-033, June 17, 1992 (BUF, RM). WESTON CO.: Newcastle, on ground in open pine forest, O. Degener 17,010 & Leroy Peiler, July 19, 1942 (NY). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Beaver dams, Camp Roosevelt, H. S. Conard, VI, 1924, c. fr. (NY).

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: ThuiAbietinellaAbietina_Web

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AMBLYODON P. Beauvois, Mag. Encycl. 5: 323. 1804 (as Amblyodum), name and orthography conserved  (Meesiaceae)

 

Amblyodon dealbatus (Hedwig) P. Beauvois in F. Cuvier, Dict. Sci. Nat. 2: 23. 1804 (as Amblyodum dealbatum)  

Meesia dealbata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 174, plate 41, figs. 6–9. 1801

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Springy and boggy places, in the Ferris Mountains, Carbon Co. (Elias Nelson, 4976), Porter, 1935.

 

PARK CO.: south slope of Bear Tooth Butte, Aug. 23, 1953, c.fr., E. Lawton. 2057 (WTU).

 

Amblystegium riparium (Hedw.) Schimp. = Leptodictyum riparium (Hedw.) Warnst.

 

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AMBLYSTEGIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 45, plates 561–566, 568–573. 1853  (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Amblystegium serpens (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 53. 1853

Hypnum serpens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 268. 1801;

 

Amblystegium juratzkanum Schimper

Amblystegium serpens var. juratzkanum (Schimper) Rau & Hervey

[[?Amblystegium porphyrrhizon Schimp. = A. juratzkanum var. serotinum (Lindb.) Wijk et Marg. (Podpr. Consp. 566). nothing in Anderson, L. W. et al. 1990.]]

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As var. serpens:)

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1550b-1552) (Roell 1893). Yellowstone is the type locality for A. serpens subspecies schlotthaueri Ren. & Card.  (1550) described in Roell, 1893.

(As Amblystegium schlotthaueri (Ren. et Card.) Par. = A. serpens (Hedw.) BSG fid. Cheney, Bot. Gaz. 24:241. 1897) “on wet rocks in Yellowstone Nat.- Park, Wyom.” (Roell 1893).   Albany, Carbon cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. (A. serpens var. serpens). Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO: “Laramie Hills” Aven Nelson 1929 (RM); Medicine Bow Mts., Medicine Bow National Forest, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, 2660 msm, Buck 23189 (NY), with Campylium hispidulum, Brachythecium cirrosum , associated with rotten wood; NW base Sheep Mtn. along WY Rte. 11, ca. 4 mi ESE of Centennial, 7,700-7,800 ft, fen with low forest of Populus, Betula, Salix in shallow water, a “hanging bog” on steep hillside. Wet rotting log, W. D. Reese 18173 (LAF, BUF) June 7, 1993. PARK CO.: wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1738 (BUF), Aug. 12, 1990.

 

(As var. juratzkanum:)

 

Albany, Carbon, [Sublette, Teton cos.], Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8,000 ft., C. L. Porter 1541 (RM). CARBON CO.: Ferris Mts. Elias Nelson 4979 (RM) July 25, 1898. FREMONT CO.: 8600 ft., F. J. Hermann 25307 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, grassy seep, swale, roots of Salix, 6,239 ft, a few miles from Mammoth Hot Springs on Road to Tower. July 6, 1995; P M Eckel 95082823 (BUF) with Brachythecium frigidum, Aulacomnium palustre, Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. bimum, Distichium capillaceum, Drepanocladus aduncus & D. uncinatus, Leptobryum pyriforme, Plagiomnium rugicum, Plagiothecium denticulatum.

 

Platydictya [costae not evident or very short], Platygyrium [costa short and double], and Pterigynandrum [costa short and double), Pylaisiella [costae short and double]: Amblystegium serpens and varieties and variations always have a costa strong to at least the middle of the leaf. Especially gracile forms may be misleading.

 

Amblystegium tenax (Hedw.) C. Jens. = Hygroamblystegium varium (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer subsp. varium

 

Amblystegium trichopodium (Schultz) Hartm. = Hygroamblystegium varium (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer subsp. varium

 

Amblystegium varium (Hedw.) Lindb. = Hygroamblystegium varium (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer, s.l.; q.v.

 

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AMPHIDIUM Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 39. 1856, name conserved · [Variant of Amphoridium (nomenclaturally unavailable), diminutive of Greek amphora, flask, alluding to capsule shape]   (Orthotrichaceae).

 

Amphidium lapponicum (Hedwig) Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 39. 1856 (Orthotrichaceae).

Anictangium lapponicum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 40. 1801 (Hedw.) Schimp.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Amphoridium lapponicum Sch. Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Upper Falls (1460, 1472) (Roell 1893).  Albany County (Porter, 1738); Johnson Co. (Porter, 1624), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

SUBLETTE CO.: 10,348 ft., Holmes Rolson III 85117 (CS).

 

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ANACOLIA Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur. ed. 2, CIII, 513. 1876, name conserved  (Bartramiaceae)

 

Anacolia menziesii (Turner) Paris, Actes Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, sér. 5, 6: 37. 1894 (as menziezii) (Bartramiaceae)

Bartramia menziesii Turner, Ann. Bot. (König & Sims) 1: 525, plate 11, fig. 1. 1805

 

Bartramia menziesii Turner

Anacolia menziesii var. baueri (Hampe) Paris

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Lawton. Wyoming, Flowers 1973.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Firehole River south of Madison Junction, Aug. 18, 1953, E. Lawton 1875 (WTU).

 

In 1990 checklist there is a var. baueri (Hampe) Flow.

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ANDREAEA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 47. 1801  (Andreaeaceae)

 

Andreaea rupestris Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 47, plate 7, fig. 2g–o. 1801  (Andreaeaceae)

 aleut.

 

Andreaea petrophila Fuernr.

NOTE: numerous synonyms in FNA Vol. 28, 2014.

 

Reported for Wyoming (errata, FNA Vol.  28, 2014).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Lost Lake. Elva Lawton 1830 (YELLO) Aug. 17, 1953.

 

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ATRICHUM P. Beauvois, Mag. Encycl. 5: 329. 1804, name conserved (Polytrichaceae)

 

Atrichum selwynii Austin, Bot. Gaz. 2: 95. 1877   (Polytrichaceae)

Atrichum rosulatum Müller Hal.  

 

Atrichum rosulatum Müller Hal.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

In all states and provinces of the P.N.; Alaska, California, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Utah, Colorado (Lawton 1971). Teton Co. ( Spence, 1985).

 

TETON CO.: 7000’, Hermann 25548 (RM, US-two specimens).

 

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Atrichum undulatum (Hedwig) P. Beauvois, Prodr.  Aethéogam., 42. 1805  (Polytrichaceae) unillo

Polytrichum undulatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 98. 1801 

 

Not reported for Wyoming; “No species occurring in North America has been as widely misunderstood as A. undulatum. Evidently introduced from Europe, its weed habitat and strongly arcuate, almost horizontal capsules are the surest means of recognition” (Merrill in FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985

 

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AULACOMNIUM Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 3(1,1,Aulacomnion): 1, plates 215, 216. 1827, name and orthography conserved (as Aulacomnion)  (Aulacomniaceae)

 

Aulacomnium androgynum (Hedwig) Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 3(1,1,Aulacomnion): 2. 1827 (as Aulacomnion) )  (Aulacomniaceae)

Bryum androgynum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 178. 1801 

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Albany, County, Sublette County, Teton County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985 citing (Porter l935) for Teton Co. Nelson, 1900. Ireland, 1982.

 

CROOK CO.: Black Hills: Williams Spring area, 4 miles E-NE of Alva; sec. 36, T55N, R63W. Conifer-deciduous woods, moss shaded on moist soil. 22, v, 1977, Churchill 8859 (TENN).

 

This plant is smaller than A. palustre, so naturally the leaves are shorter, they are not twisted and contorted as in the next. The cells at the base are not differentiated into large, hyaline to yellow cells, nor are they brown. The basal cells here are just like the laminal cells. If the propaguliferous stalks (pseudopodia) are present, they are naked of leaves or bracts and the propagula are clustered into a globose head.

 

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Aulacomnium palustre (Hedwig) Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 3(1,1,Aulacomnion): 4. 1827 (as Aulacomnion)    (Aulacomniaceae)

Mnium palustre Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 188. 1801

 

 [from previous checklist:]

Gymnocybe palustris (Hedw.) Fries, nom. rejic.

Mnium palustre Hedw.

Mnium papillosum C. Muell.

Sphaerocephalus palustris (Hedw.) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, 6000 ped. alt., sterile (1523-25) (Roell 1893).

n Park Co. Aulacomnium palustre forms a rich bryophyte community combined with Hylocomium splendens, Climacium dendroides, Elodium blandowii, Rhizomnium spp., Thuidium recognitum, Marchantia alpestris, [Thuidium recognitum, q.v.] and others “ (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011). Park Co., with Sphagnum warnstorfii, Campylopus schimperi (Kosovich 2011a).

 

Aulacomnium papillosum L. & J. Centennial, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 1746), Porter 1935 = A. palustre var. papillosum (C. Muell.) Podp. in Index Muscorum. No reference to this variety is made in the new checklist. It appears no reference is made to this variety by Crum & Anderson Vol. 1 p. 619.

 

Albany, Sheridan, [Sublette, Teton cos.], Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: A. Nelson 7820 (RM); A. Nelson 8899 (RM); Medicine Bow Mts., in woodland bogs, 8-10000 ft., Nelson 7820 (id’d by Holzinger as A. androg.) (TENN). BIG HORN CO.: 10,000-10,800 ft., Odasz 742 (RM); Big Horn Natl. For., Lake Solitude Quad., Cloud Peak Wilderness Area, 9,840 ft., filled in lake, Aug. 5, 1992 Katherine Zacharkevics (BING), + Drepanocladus aduncus aduncus, Warnstorfia exannulata. CARBON CO.: F. J. Hermann 17804 (RM). FREMONT CO.: 9300 ft., F.J. Hermann 25293 (RM). PARK CO.: 7500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20060 (RM); Beartooth Pass, 10000 ft., F.J. Hermann 20073 (RM). PARK CO.: wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1741 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. SHERIDAN CO.: Dome Lake, A. Nelson 2417 (RM); Odasz 875 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 17/viii/1989 ca. 1.5 mile east of Barnes Lake, 10,080 ft. elev. 42°58’W, 109°34’W. Sedge fen with Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Philonotis fontana & Drepanocladus exannulatus Richard Andrus 7871 (BING). TETON CO: , on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000’, Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters. Wooded stream, soggy debris, c.fr. July 6, 1985, w. Distichium capillaceum, Eckel 94082100 (BUF, RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: A. & E. Nelson 6429 (RM); 6099 (RM). La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5265 (RM).

 

When the propagula are gone, frequently the far distal end of the pseudopodium has tiny dark-brown points where the propagula were once attached and the “receptacle” is elongate. The “receptacle” of A. androgynum, when the propagulae are gone, is sharply and distinctly spherical. If they extend down a ways from the pseudopodium, this should indicate you are dealing with A. palustre, since its propagula are not confined to the tips. Examination of the leaf basal cells should confirm this. If the large cells are not there, they were probably left on the stem when the leaf was removed.

 

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BARBULA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 115. 1801, name conserved (Pottiaceae)

 

Barbula convoluta Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 120.  1801  (Pottiaceae)   var. convoluta

 

Barbula closteri Austin;

Barbula convoluta var. obtusata Müller Hal. & Kindberg [FNA, Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27,  2007).

 

ALBANY CO.: F.J. Hermann 17775 1\2, 8500 ft., (RM).

 

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Barbula unguiculata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 118.  1801 (Pottiaceae) unillo

 

Barbula unguiculata var. apiculata (Hedw.) Bruch, Shimper & Gümbel.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Rochelle Hills, Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: along Roger Canyon in the Laramie Mtns, 7 mi. due NE of Laramie city centr, Artemesia scrub vegetation, limestone cliffs and outcrops, 7,600 ft., soil below edge of limestone boulder, W. D. Reese 18149 (BUF, LAF) June 7, 1993.

 

A specimen from Rochelle Hills, Campbell Co. from MO was redetermined to be Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum (q.v.) (Weber, 5-8 June, 1975).

 

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BARTRAMIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 164. 1801, name conserved  (Bartramiaceae)

 

Bartramia ithyphylla Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(3): 132, plate 1, fig. 6. 1803 (as Barthramia)   (Bartramiaceae)

 

Bartramia ithyphylla var. breviseta (Lindberg) Kindberg

Bartramia ithyphylla subsp. rigidula (Lindberg) Kindberg

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1494) (Roell 1893).

Brooklyn Lake, Albany Co. (Elias Nelson, 5177), Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO., Hermann 17715, (RM), 10,800 ft. c.fr. Aug. 3, l962. CARBON CO.: c.fr. Aug.6, l962, 9000’, Hermann 17800 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57’30”N, 109°36’W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake, with Mnium thomsonii Schimp. Richard Andrus 7787a (BING).

 

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BLINDIA Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 17. 1846  (Seligeriaceae)

 

Blindia acuta (Hedwig) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 19. 1846 (Seligeriaceae)

Weissia acuta Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 71. 1801

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Park Co., with Philonotis yezoana, q.v.

 

PARK CO. 3200 msm, W. A. Weber, B-44312 (RM, COLO). SUBLETTE CO.: above Upper Twin Lake, vicinity Pass Lake, Highline Trail between Summit Lake and Peak Lake, Jim Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Mts., 10,348 ft. Holmes Rolston III 84134 (BUF, CS).

 

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Brachymenium vinosulum Cardot = Plagiobryoides vinosula (Cardot) J. R. Spence (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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BRACHYTHECIASTRUM Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 259. 2003  (Brachytheciaceae)

 

Brachytheciastrum collinum (Schleicher ex Müller Hal.) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 260. 2003 (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum collinum Schleicher ex Müller Hal., Syn. Musc. Frond. 2: 429. 1851

 

Brachythecium collinum (Schleicher ex Müller Hal.) Schimper

Brachythecium idahense Renauld & Cardot

Hypnum hillebrandii Lesquereux (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium collinum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1540, 1548a, 1565a) (Roell 1893).

(As Brachythecium collinum) Albany, Carbon, Sublette, Teton Counties and Yellowstone National Park, Porter 1935. Albany Co. (Porter 680; 698; 651, 654), Yellowstone National Park (Bartram and Smiley), Porter 1934. Albany Co, Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.]

 

(As Brachythecium collinum) ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mtns., Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, 2400 msm, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck 23168 (NY); S bank of Little Brooklyn Lake, Medicine Bow Mtns, 10,300 ft. Eleanor Schriever 14 (RM), June 30, 1949;

Medicine Bow Mountains, Barber Lake Picnic area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek, elev. 8720-8740 ft., Pinus contorta forest along stream, on soil, N.G. Miller 10,256 (NYS) June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest on US26 & US287, between Moran & Dubois, ca. 9000’, alpine meadow, much herbage, wet with flowing streams, soil between granite boulders, N slope knoll, c.fr. July 6, 1985, Eckel 94081301 (BUF, RM). JOHNSON CO., PM Eckel 14886. PARK CO.: Bear tooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Hwy; Picea forest with Pinus flexiils and contorta, Vaccinium scoparium forest floor; in duff on forest floor, Weber B-44220 (COLO, RM) [id. as B. velut. var. venust., growing on wood: shade form.] TETON CO.: E boundary of Tateon Co., Continental Divide, Tworoger Pass, 9000 ft., on ground, T. C. Frye June 22, 1931 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATL. PK: in Norris Geyser Basin, R. C. Frye, Aug. 14, 1925 (RM); stream bank on rock, on slope, 17 miles W of East Entrance W. H. Welch 14883 (YELLO) Aug. 29, 1951.

 

(As Brachythecium collinum) Leaves have distinctively sharp serrations from apex to especially the quadrate cells in the basal angles. The leaf cells appear to be short, almost like Amblystegium, especially in the apex. Note the leaves are decurrent: care must be taken when removing the leaves.

 

(As Brachythecium collinum) Like Pseudoleskeella tectorum [which has none to variable costae in the leaves], although the julaceous form in drier habitats is perhaps more readily come to hand, one must be careful of the shade forms, too: the costa is single and strong enough to separate from Ps. tectorum (with has generally entire margins, seldom fruits and has short cells as in Amblystegium]. B. collinum fruits in July. This species is separate from B. velutinum var. venustum by the smooth setae (although see Flowers who indicates scattered papillae), but more importantly the broadly ovate-lanceolate character of the leaves with their abrupt acumination. Flowers also indicates that the B. velutinum var. venustum has “perichaetial leaves slenderly-long acuminate, often hairlike” which B. collinum does not have, the variety also has narrower leaves overall. The shade form of B. collinum is not particularly concave in leaves on the slide, although they appear this way on the stem.

 

Brachytheciastrum  collinum may be more associated with humus and litter, rotten wood than var. venustum which seems to prefer soil and rock. Note that Weber’s thought that B. collinum and B. velutinum may be variants of one another seems credible. Note somewhat julaceous habit of B. fendleri that may be confused with this species. B. fendleri has distinctive upright fruit. Collinum is abruptly acuminate, while B. fendleri is “gradually to narrowly acuminate, sometimes very slenderly so” Flowers p. 430. Note form Eurhynchium pulchelum fo. praecox is also julaceous and resembles Brachythecium collinum by the coarse serrations. The latter, however, has cells in the apices of all leaves that are elongate (greater than 2: 1). Eurhynchiastrum pulchellum is more broadly deltoid at the leaf base, B. collinum more ovate-lanceolate. The obtuse to broadly acute apices of the branch leaves, with apical cells short [1: 1 to 2: 1] are more characteristic of E. pulchellum.

 

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Brachytheciastrum fendleri (Sullivant) Ochyra & Żarnowiec, Biodivers. Poland 3: 172. 2003 (Brachytheciaceae)

Leskea fendleri Sullivant, Mem. Amer. Acad. Arts, n. s. 4: 169, plate 1. 1849

 

Brachythecium fendleri (Sullivant) A. Jaeger (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

 (Synonymy for Brachythecium fendleri in earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Brachythecium utahense James in Watson

Hypnum fendleri (Sull.) Sull. & Lesq.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium fendleri) (earlier as Brachythecium utahense James) Albany Co. (Porter 1442; 637); Carbon Co. (Porter 908), Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1934. (As Brachythecium utahense James) Albany County, Carbon County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. (As Brachythecium utahense James) Albany, Carbon cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Southern Wyoming, Flowers 1973. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

(As Brachythecium fendleri) ALBANY CO.: Centennial Hills, Aven Nelson 2716 (RM), Aug. 20, 1896, c.fr.

 

(As Brachythecium fendleri) This rather diminutive Brachythecium is distinctive in its upright straight capsules what are longer and narrower than typical for the genus. Its small size puts it in Flower’s B. collinum group (fendleri, delicatulum, suberythrorrhizon [= velutinum var. venustum], erythrorrhizon). It is also distinctive in its synoicous inflorescences. Without fruit they look remarkably like B. collinum. Br. fendleri is sharply toothed, even to the base and in the Az. specimen spoon shaped leaves especially at the leaf base (MacFadden 8009 det. Grout from Grand Canyon (RM). Note that the leaves appear broadly recurved-naviculate on one side at the leaf base.

 

(As Brachythecium fendleri) The 2716 specimen has COARSE, sharp serrate teeth to the leaf base, with shortened cells in the apex and occasionally rostrate opercula, but what else could be synoicous as this specimen robustly is? And the cilia are short while the endostome matches the exostome teeth. Teeth and short apical cells distinctive in branch leaves.

 

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Brachytheciastrum leibergii (Grout) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 260. 2003 (Brachytheciaceae)

Brachythecium leibergii Grout, Mem. Torrey Bot. Club 6: 197. 1897

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium leibergii) ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mountains, Medicine Bow National Forest, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, 2660 msm, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, Buck 23202 (NY) (setae detaching, old), June 7, 1993, with Ceratodon purpureus, Distichium capillaceum. CARBON CO.: on wet rock at edge of Trail Creek, W of Sand Lake Rd., 9000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 4 1/2 SW Morgan, Hermann 17808 (RM, US) (sterile, Aug. 6, 1962: based on pinnate branching, serrations, plications, decurrencies, robust, etc.) det. by Robinson. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Old Cooke Ranger Station, H. S. Conard 48-282 (YELLO) Aug. 31, 1948 (det. as B. glareosum-autoicous); east slope along old road above Crescent Hill, H. S. Conard 48-253 (YELLO) Sept. 3, 1948 (det. as B. glareosum-autoicous).

 

(As Brachythecium leibergii) A beautiful, robust moss with clearly pinnate branching except for multiple branching supporting gametoecia. Leaves serrate and seta roughened; leaves are falcate, even when removed from the stem, clearly plicate wet or dry. The plant is very robust, compared to other pleurocarps in mixed collections. The shoulders of the leaf are lower than other species of the genus, it seems, and the strong serrations are striking. The papillae are tiny, sharp and distant on the seta. The homomallous character need not be strong - some leaves can be straight. The alar cells are numerous, quadrate, alar areas can be excavate. In both of the Yellowstone specimens (Conard) long strips of stem material stripped away along with the decurrencies. These specimens were irregularly pinnate and resemble large forms of B. velutinum (note coarse serrations like B. collinum - a continuous gradation?). Branch leaves are coarsely serrate (not serrulate), reminiscent of the serrations on B. collinum.

 

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Brachytheciastrum velutinum var. salicinum  (Schimper) Ochyra & Żarnowiec, Biodivers. Poland 3: 172. 2003 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Brachythecium salicinum Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 19, plate 548. 1853

 

Brachythecium salicinum Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper

Brachythecium suberythrorrhizon Renault & Cardot

Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum (De Notaris) Archangelico (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(Synonymy of Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum (De Not.) Arc. from previous Wyoming checklist:)

Brachythecium olympicum Jur. in Ung. & Kotschy

Brachythecium petrophilum Williams

Brachythecium suberythrorrhizon Ren. & Card.

Brachythecium suberythrorrhizon var. suberythrorrhizon (Ren. & Card.) Grout

Chamberlainia collina var. suberythrorrhiza (Ren. & Card.) Robins.

Hypnum venustum De Not.

 

(As Brachythecium suberythrorrhizon Ren. & Card.) Wyoming, Flowers 1973.

 

(As Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum )ALBANY CO.; Medicine Bow Mtns., Barber Lake picnic area; ca. 2.5 mi. due NW of Centennial; ca. 8,700 ft., Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, W. D. Reese 18169 (LAF) June 7, 1993; Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 8 air miles NE of Laramie city center, 7850-8000 ft., on soil under shrubs, N. G. Miller 10,243 (NYS) June 7, 1993. LINCOLN CO.; on

granite boulder on slope above Salt River, Silver Stream Motel, 6000 ft. 11 miles N of Ashton, Hermann 17843 (RM), Aug. 11, 1962 (ver. by Robinson as Chamberlainia collina var. suberythrorrhiza - seems intergrades between B. venustum and B. collinum noted by Weber are so noted by others). TETON CO: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters. Soil, forest floor, over organic debris, including punky wood. c.fr. July 6, 1985 Eckel 94081608 (RM, BUF).

 

(As Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum )Another specimen (Eckel 94082003 BUF) from the same locality shows a nearly complete intergradation with Brachythecium collinum. In the Teton specimen, many of the stems are light yellow green. Note the leaf cells are so thick walled and short, they appear to be an Amblystegium, were it not for the capsules. The serrations are as distinctive as in those of B. collinum, which may be a variant of this species (Weber 1973), much as Brachythecium turgidum seems to be a variant of Br. salebrosum.

 

(As Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum ) In Lawton's key she reflects the variability of the species in the degree of its plications (distinct to smooth) and the variability of the falcations (curved to straight) - the autoicous condition of this species is readily evident and critical to a quick determination of this plant. It is likely that Flower's B. delicatulum, B. collinum var. idahense, B. collinum, B. velutinum and B. velutinum var. venustum are all the same thing. The Reese specimen from Albany co was large and looked like B. albicans with its long, narrow acumina, but it was so falcate as to appear a Drepanocladus, it was autoicous, seta smooth and cells on margins serrulate, serrate in branch leaves, strongly plicate.

 

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Brachytheciastrum velutinum (Hedwig) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 260. 2003 (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum velutinum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 272. 1801

 

var. velutinum

Brachythecium petrophilum R. S. Williams

 

The var. velutinum has not yet been found in Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Synonymy for Brachythecium velutinum in previous Wyoming checklist:)

Brachythecium collinum var. idahense (Ren.& Card.) Grout

Brachythecium idahense Ren. & Card.

Hypnum velutinum Hedw.

 

(As Brachythecium velutinum) Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1934. As Brachythecium velutinum (L.) B. & S. Lake and Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935 Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Ireland, 1982.

 

The typical variety is said to have setae roughened by large papillae throughout, whereas the var. venustum has them smooth or slightly rough at the base (Lawton).

 

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BRACHYTHECIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 5, plates 535–555. 1853  (Brachytheciaceae)

 

BRACHYTHECIUM

When taking leaves off the stem, care must be made to preserve or note decurrencies (in many spp.: B. frigidum, B. albicans, B. rutabulum, B. reflexum, etc.). Alar cells are best seen in OLD LEAVES (McFarland, Mexico). Sometimes B. salebrosum can be so plicate it seems like a Homalothecium, however that genus is all dioicous. Quasi-deltoid, flat leaves with absolutely entire margins and inflated basal cells of plants from wet areas, such as the edges of lakes or in marshes may lead one to try B. nelsonii or B. starkei but one might want to consider Drepanocladus aduncus var. kneiffii - this has straight leaves and may have them short - perhaps totally what one may not expect from a Drepanocladus (long, falcate leaves). The clue is the leaf cells which are short enough to remind one of the Amblystegiaceae and the completely entire leaf margins: of the two Brachythecia mentioned, the first has concave bases, the last is toothed and both have longer cells.

 

Note that the falcate types are:

B. leibergii (rough seta, autoicous, regularly pinnate, SMOOTH to SERRULATE, esp. in branch leaves); large 1.8 - 2.6 mm. PLICATE. The pinnate character is probably decisive; when Lawton p. 293 says “The branching is usually more regularly pinnate than in any of the species which might be confused with it” one could imagine the following taxa (looking at Lawton’s descriptions, only B. asperrimum might be subpinnate, and Crum & Anderson indicate B. reflexum is (p. 1035) - note they also indicate the leaves are slightly homomallous in the branches: the costa is percurrent).

 

B. erythrorrhizon (smooth seta, irregular branching, dioicous, leaves 1.5 - 2.0 mm, branch leaves without spines at costa end) PLICATE, leaf margins ENTIRE “dioicous inflorescences and smooth setae, and the broad leaves are plicate and falcate with serrations at the tips” C & A p. 1032.

 

B. velutinum (smooth seta, irregular branching, autoicous, small: 1 - 1.8 mm leaves, costa with spines at tips, leaf margins SERRULATE (perhaps as in B. collinum, cf. Weber). NOT or slightly PLICATE.

 

[Note Flowers indicated B. frigidum and B. asperrimum (now lumped) can be falcate to straight, are dioicous, deltoid-ovate, sometimes with auricles, usu. a row of more or less inflated cells across the base attaching the leaf to the stem.]

 

Brachythecium acutum (Mitten) Sullivant, Icon. Musc., suppl., 99. 1874 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum acutum Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 33, plate 6 [upper right]. 1864

 

Amblystegium riparium var. serratum Ren. & Card.

Brachythecium pseudocollinum Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany Co. (Porter 559; 747; 753; 783); Teton Co. (Porter 1159 & 1163), Porter 1934.

 

(As Brachythecium acutum) Albany County, Carbon County and Teton County, Porter, 1935. Albany, Carbon, Teton cos. Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Albany Co. (Porter 536, 542); Carbon Co. (Porter 900); Teton Co. (Porter 1205, 1216; 1185a); Yellowstone National Park (Nelson 5812; Porter 1242, 1244), Porter 1934. (Brachythecium acutum (Mitt.) Sull. reported for Albany and Teton cos. by Porter, 1937, was synonymized by Robinson into B. salebrosum as an “eplicate form”; Crum & Anderson exclude it from the Eastern North American flora, p. 1055. See Grout.)

 

ALBANY CO.: Centennial Valley, Aven Nelson 1698 (RM) c.fr. Aug. 17, 1895.

 

This specimen corresponds very well with Grout's description except for the plications: the plants were “somewhat complanate” the leaves ending in long apices that are gradually developed, the color is “glossy-green to yellowish-green”. It is rather critical to note that the plants were autoicous.

 

[Not in Lawton] Excluded from Northeastern North America by Crum & Anderson (1981). “Grout recognized this species from a broad range across the continent, in the northern United States and adjacent Canada, south in our area to New Jersey and Ohio. Robinson considered it to be merely an eplicate form of Brachythecium salebrosum” p. 1055. The Nelson specimen keyed to Br. salebrosum in Lawton, not B. albicans, which is dioicous.]

 

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Brachythecium albicans (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 23. 1853 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum albicans Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 251. 1801

 

Brachythecium albicans var. occidentale Renauld & Cardot

Brachythecium beringianum Cardot & Thériot

Brachythecium pseudoalbicans Kindberg

Chamberlainia albicans (Hedwig) H. Robinson (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brachythecium pseudoalbicans Kindb. in Macoun.

Hypnum albicans Hedw.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1542-45) (Roell 1893).

Mammoth, Old Faithful, and Lake, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

LINCOLN CO: moist open willow flat along Fire Trail Creek at Greys River, 6400 ft., Salt River Range, 8 miles E of Alpine Junction, Hermann 25588 (RM), Aug. 30, 1973. [specimen with no teeth except some at tip - including branch leaves: strongly falcate, branches not all julaceous when dry]; base of a dead tree in open shade, Fishing Bridge, Dwight C. Smiley 257 (YELLO) Sept. 10, 1932 (det. as B. glareosum-dioicous)

 

Separated from B. erythrorhizon (which is falcate) by the entire margins of branch leaves (serrate in B. erythro.) The leaf apices are strikingly long-filiform in Crum & Anderson Exsiccat NO.783, although only slenderly acuminate (Crum & Anderson p. 1025). Stem leaves are strongly plicate and have long rather broad decurrencies. Concave at the base. “Older stem leaves with quadrate to laxly rectangular alar cells ... Base of stem leaves extending straight into decurrencies [vs. being rounded before extending]; alar region composed of distinct columns of quadrate cells between leaf margins and plicae and extending into the decurrencies: dioicous” McFarland in Sharp et al. Crum & Anderson note that albicans is “rather broadly decurrent; alar cells lax and somewhat enlarged.” Note the stems are supposed to be terete to julaceous - imbricate when dry. In the exsiccat specimen the lax quadrate cells collapsed under Hoyer's solution. Color: pale yellow (exsiccat). Flowers and Lawton make the point that the leaves are ENTIRE “sometimes slightly serrate at the apex only” Crum & Anderson. The branches appear to be SMALL. Specimens of B. salebrosum may occasionally have long acuminations, so untypical, one would think, that B. albicans may come to mind. B. salebrosum will be autoicous and the plants will be plumose, that is, foliose rather than julaceous or ropey as in B. albicans. Very important are the serrations all up and down the stem leaves of B. salebrosum, more pronounced on branch leaves: these are absent in B. albicans.

 

Brachythecium asperrimum (Mitt.) Sull. = Brachythecium frigidum (C. Muell.) Besch.

 

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Brachythecium brandegeei (Austin) H. Robinson, Bryologist 65: 125. 1963 (as brandegei)  (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum brandegeei Austin, Bot. Gaz. 3: 31. 1878 (as brandegei)

 

Cirriphyllum brandegeei (Austin) Grout

 

Park Co.: Brachythecium brandegeei was reported growing with Polytrichastrum sexangulare, Polytrichum juniperinum,  and Sanionia nivalis (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

Wyoming; “Wet soil in mountain tundra, rock, wet cliffs; high elevations (3100--3900 m); Colo., Wyo.”(Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014), (Kosovich-Anderson and Ignatov 2010).

 

Brachythecium calcareum Kindb.  = Brachythecium campestre (Müller Hal.) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper

 

[Brachythecium campestre (Müller Hal.) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 16. 1853 ;  excluded (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum rutabulum var. campestre Müller Hal., Syn. Musc. Frond. 2: 368. 1851  

 

Brachythecium calcareum Kindberg

Brachythecium leucoglaucum Müller Hal. & Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Not reported for Wyoming; according to Ignatov, the distribution of the species is eastern North America (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

[As Brachythecium calcareum](A specimen of Dwight C. Smiley's at YELLO (no. 27) determined as B. flexicaule, “moist stream bank, mouth of Clematis Gulch” is a sterile, depauperate Brachythecium. A row of inflated basal cells attaching leaves to the stem seen on old leaves indicates this specimen is Brachythecium frigidum. p. 1044 Crum & Anderson cannot sort out conflicting nomenclatural attributions in a discussion sub B. salebrosum. = B. calcareum Kindb. sec. Crum et al. l973. [not in Lawton]. Occurs in the 1990 checklist. ]

 

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Brachythecium cirrosum (Schwägrichen) Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur., 696. 1860 (as cirrhosum) (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum cirrosum Schwägrichen in J. A. Schultes, Reise Glockner 2: 365. 1804  

 

Cirriphyllum cirrosum (Schwägrichen) Grout

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Cirriphyllum cirrosum) ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., Medicine Bow National Forest, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, 2660 msm, Buck 23189 (NY), (in specimen labeled Amblystegium serpens, with Campylium hispidulum, associated with rotten wood).

 

Note how serrate the margins are, as in C. piliferum (in Crum & Anderson, p. 1061); note long decurrencies down stem.

 

Brachythecium collinum (Schleich. ex C.Muell.) Schimp. in B.S.G. = Brachytheciastrum collinum  (Schleicher ex Müller Hal.) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

Brachythecium leibergii Grout = Brachytheciastrum leibergii (Grout) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

Brachythecium erythrorrhizon Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 18, plate 547. 1853  (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

 

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var. erythrorrhizon or s.l.

 

Plants medium-sized to moderately large.  Leaves falcate-secund, 1.5--2.3 mm; laminal cells linear, 60--90 \um” (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany, Carbon, Teton Counties and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. [?Albany (Porter 859); Carbon (Porter 895); Teton (Porter 1217, 1222; Porter 1158, 1190); Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1934. Albany, Carbon, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985, citing Porter,  Ireland, 1982. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: “growing along rotten log on moist soil. Common,” R. Lichvar, 1347a (RM); carpeting floor of spruce forest, Little Brooklyn lake, 10,400 ft., Medicine Bow Mtns, 7 miles NW of Centennial, Hermann 26721a (RM) [sterile, but leaves gently falcate in places on stem, plicate, entire margins, plicate, etc., rhizoids sparse); Medicine Bow Mountains, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek, 8720-8740 ft, Pinus contorta forest; on soil under Pinus contorta, N. G. Miller 10,257 (NYS) June 7, 1993. PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Hwy., Picea forest with Pinus flexilis and contorta, Vaccinium scoparium forest floor; on forest floor, Weber B-44219 (COLO, RM) (falcation strong; on wood). SUBLETTE Co.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 17/viii/1989 ca. 1.5 mile east of Barnes Lake, 10,080 ft. elev. 42°58’W, 109°34’W. Thin peat terrace. Richard Andrus 7870 (BING). TETON CO.: Cascade Canyon, H. S. Conard, Aug. 14, 1953 (US).

 

This plant is said to have lots of rhizoids (abundant) at the base of the stem, but not seen in the last of the two specimens cited above or in any of the specimens seen.

 

Yellow-green to pale yellow; green to sordid looking when the leaves assume a reddish cast, and then the red rhizoids evident. Sometimes the falcateness is only evident on some of the stems and stem sections. The sterile Park Co. specimen is differentiated from B. leibergii by its irregular branching. Told from B. leibergii by the SMOOTH SETA: leibergii has a papillose seta.

 

The leaves are unusually broad and falcate and deeply plicate, leaving one, macroscopically at least, to jump at it being Drepanocladus uncinatus - basal cells not hyaline-inflated. The costa appears very broad, hinting at Cratoneuron, but basal cells are not sharply inflated as in that genus (and Palustriella). The leaf cells appear short for a Brachythecium, hence the first calls for something in the Amblystegiaceae. The falcation and plication are striking under the dissecting scope.

 

Note that B. leibergii is generally SERRATE along the leaf margins, or at the base (occasionaly smooth acc. to Lawton). B. erythrorrhizon is more smooth, denticulate in the apex.

 

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var. alpinum Kosovich-Anderson & Ignatov, Arctoa 19: 190, fig. 4. 2011

 

Wyoming, “Variety alpinum has strongly plicate and concave leaves, julaceous foliage, and numerous alar cells.  These alpine plants from the Rocky Mountains resemble Brachythecium coruscum rather than B. erythrorrhizon var. erythrorrhizon, but differ in larger cells in alar regions and leaf decurrencies (Kosovich-Anderson and Ignatov 2010)(Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Brachythecium fendleri (Sull.) Jaeg. = Brachytheciastrum fendleri (Sullivant) Ochyra & Żarnowiec

 

Brachythecium flexicaule Renauld & Cardot = Brachythecium salebrosum (Hoffmann ex F. Weber & D. Mohr) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper

 

 

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Brachythecium frigidum (Müller Hal.) Bescherelle, Mém. Soc. Natl. Sci. Nat. Cherbourg 16: 248. 1872 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum frigidum Müller Hal., Bot. Zeitung (Berlin) 14: 456. 1856 

 

Brachythecium asperrimum (C. Muell.) Sull. (Anderson et al. 1990).

Brachythecium lamprochryseum C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Brachythecium lamprochryseum var. giganteum Grout

Hypnum fridigum C. Muell.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium lamprochryseum var. solfaterense Grout) Solfatara Creek, Yellowstone National Park (Streeter), “This is the type collections referred to by Dr. Grout (1928),” Porter, 1935. (As Brachythecium lamprochryseum C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun) Wyoming, Flowers 1973.

 

ALBANY CO.: Wood’s Creek, Nelson 3480 (US); gregarious over moist bank; canyon bottom in pine forest, 8,000 ft., Snowy Range, A. P. Kelley 791 (NY) July 31, 1926; ca. 4 air miles east-SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY11, 7700- 7900 ft, Populus, Betula and Salix associated with spring seep; open fen, N.G. Miller 10, 278 (NYS) June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: Peaty bank of stream on spruce-fir slope, Burroughs Creek Rd., 8400 ft., Absaroka Range, 14 miles N of Dubois, Hermann 25511, Aug. 28, 1973 (NY, US); on branch submerged in stream on spruce-fir slope, Burroughs Creek Rd., 8400 ft. Absaroka Range, 14 miles N of Dubois, Hermann 25520 (US); about 12 miles westward near Togwotee Pass, 9,000 ft. on ground, T. C. Frye June 22, 1931 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 18/viii/1989 Carex fen S. of Timico Lake. Richard Andrus no.7891 (BING). TETON CO.: partially submerged in shallow stream along Hidden Falls Trail, NW of Jenny Lake, 7000 ft., Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Hermann 25578 (US, RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: grassy seep, swale, roots of Salix, 6,239 ft, a few miles from Mammoth Hot Springs on Road to Tower. P. M. Eckel 95082825 (BUF) July 6, 1995, with Aulacomnium palustre, Amblystegium juratz., Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. bimum, Distichium capillaceum, Drepanocladus aduncus & D. uncinatus, Leptobryum pyriforme, Plagiomnium rugicum, Plagiothecium denticulatum Note the large, coarse stems. Note that according to Flowers the leaves of both this and B. asperrimum can be “sometimes falcate” ! and so confused with B. erythrorhizon. Plicate leaves are important, the somewhat abruptly short acuminate leaf apices. In the Mexican flora (p. 919) note “older stem leaves with inflated alar cells; dioicous; setae papillose throughout.” In the Fremont Co. specimen. Frye, June 22, 1931, the decurrent alar cells were distinctly inflated and enlarged. These inflations extended to the costa. Look in older stem leaves for inflations. Note also for this species the stem attachment cells as left on the leaf are SHELVED so that you need to raise and lower the lens: a depth of field issue in one ridge that is very distinctive in this moss: see Norris “buttresses”.

 

[Brachythecium glareosum (Br.) B. & S.]

 

Lake, Yellowstone National Park  (Smiley), Porter, 1935 excluded from North America by Anderson, et al., 1990. It is not included in the North American flora by Ignatov (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).]

 

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Brachythecium laetum (Bridel) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 24. 1853 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum laetum Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 479. 1827

 

Brachythecium digastrum Müller Hal. ex Kindberg

 

Wyoming; “the name Brachythecium oxycladum of American authors but not (Bridel) A. Jaeger has been applied to many species which are B. laetum” (Ignatov FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1545) (Roell 1893).

 

Brachythecium leibergii Grout = Brachytheciastrum leibergii   (Grout) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

Brachythecium nelsonii Grout = Sciuro-hypnum latifolium (Kindberg) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

Brachythecium oedipodium (Mitt.) Jaeg. = Sciuro-hypnum oedipodium (Mitten) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

[Brachythecium oxycladon (Brid.) Jaeg., excluded from North America.

 

“The name Brachythecium oxycladum of American authors but not (Bridel) A. Jaeger has been applied to many species which are B. laetum” (Ignatov, Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Mammoth and Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1935. Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. [not in Lawton]] Also Porter, 1934.

 

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Brachythecium rivulare Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 17, plate 546. 1853   (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Note B. lamprochryseum is not noted in the treatment of Brachytheciaceae by Ignatov (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Brachythecium lamprochryseum var. solfatarense Grout. N. Am. Musci Pleuroc. n. 327. 1912 [in Lawton as 1910]). (As Brachythecium lamprochryseum var. solfatarense), Yellowstone National Park (Mrs. Streeter, type collection), Porter 1934.

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1546) (Roell 1893).

Albany Co. (Porter 948, 1018; Nelson 5356; Porter 1030; Porter 662; Nelson 10951; Porter 781b); Teton Co. (Porter 1153, 1147, 1148); Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter 1934. Albany, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985, citing Porter.

 

ALBANY CO: peaty bank of N. Fork of Little Laramie River on Sand Lake Rd., 8500 ft. Medicine Bow Mts, 3 miles W Centennial, Herman 17738, Aug. 4, 1962, sterile (NY); wet knoll on bank of Libby Creek, Libby Creek Campground, 8500 ft., Medicine Bow Mts. 2 miles W of Centennial, Hermann 17674 (US); Medicine Bow Mtns, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, 2660 msm, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, Buck 23198 (NY); Laramie, Nelson 4283 Sept. 15, 1897 (RM, US) [this specimen complanate, flat, leaves very distant on the stem and attenuated - a water form). FREMONT CO: on wet boulder in stream on spruce-fir slope, Burroughs Creek Rd. 8400 ft., Absaroka Range, 14 miles N of Dubois, Hermann 25517 (RM) Aug. 28, 1973 [specimen broadly acuminate although flat above and with inflated cells to the costa] . NATRONA CO.: Hat Six Falls, Nelson 5037 (RM) [this specimen with distant leaves and sharply serrulate stem leaf margins; also det. Weber]. PARK CO: wet peaty edge of streamlet through tundra below Beartooth Pass, 10000 ft., Shoshone Natl. Foreest, 38 miles NW of Cody, Hermann 20075 (RM), July 19, 1965. SHERIDAN CO.: floating on water and on logs and branches in slow flowing water, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 28, McKee 92-049, with Mnium medium (BUF, RM). TETON CO.: Hwy 22, Burbank Creek 6 miles southeast of Victor. Pinus-Pseudotsuga forests, primitive rocks, 2260 msm, on wet soil and rocks, Duell & Duell 2230, Aug. 7, 1981 (NY); [Teton-Sublette cos.] Gros Ventre mts., C. C. Curtis, 8500 ft. (NY). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Yellowstone Falls, 7500 ft., Rydberg & Bessey, June-Aug, 1897, The New York Botanical Garden exploration of Montana and Yellowstone Park (NY)

 

Robust plants pale white-yellow, white green. Broad acute apices are striking for this species in the genus: sharply serrulate above, but some leaves smooth. Dendroid habit. Leaves STRONGLY concave like a spoon; cf. B. nelsonii which is flat, entire margins typical with extensive° inflated basal cells to costa, not dendroid habit. The Hermann 25517 specimen resembled B. nelsonii in inflated cells to the costa and flat upper leaf, but I figure the broadness of the leaf and its abrupt acumination made it B. rivulare (that is, the leaf shape was distinctive). Frequently without dendroid habit, apparently, and with leaves distant on stem - in water (submerged or emergent) forming “long loose masses or when crowded often becoming erect in deep dense tufts.” p. 444. Not Scleropodium because these are not or scarcely decurrent (Lawton, p. 310).

 

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Brachythecium rutabulum (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 15. 1853 (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum rutabulum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 276. 1801

 

Wyoming; “In eastern North America, Brachythecium rutabulum is widespread from the North Temperate Zone to the southern part of the Boreal Zone; in the West it has only been confirmed from British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.  Collections in Colorado were made at 1500--2740 m, otherwise B. rutabulum rarely exceeds 1000 m” (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Big Horn Mts., Big Horn County (Aven Nelson, 2234), Porter, 1935. Big Horn Co. (Nelson 2234), Porter 1934. Big Horn Co., Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn., along Wy 11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23247 (NY), June 7, 1993 (capsules missing, most setae detached and lost; note leaves plicate).

 

Almost identical to B. leibergii in every detail: this species is subpinnate, whereas B. leibergii is supposedly more pinnate. Leibergii has falcate leaves, B. rutabulum straight. B. rutabulum stem leaves are abruptly acuminate. Serrations are the same, sex, rough setae. Buck's strongly plicate stem leaves are rather problematical, since this species is not or somewhat plicate. The branch ends also help differentiate the two species: in B. leibergii they are densely foliate, B. rutabulum they become distant on the stem, narrowed and hence “stoloniferous” according to Grout; the stem is somewhat visible between leaf bases, as opposed to the dense crowding of the rest of the stem or branch.

 

Brachythecium rutabulum is said to be somewhat larger than B. leibergii. Note a specimen from Niagara Falls was nearly identical to the Wyoming material: serrate to base, subpinnate, abruptly narrowed acuminate, AND PLICATE, concave; another was more oval, very sharply narrowed to a narrow acumen, hair-like and twisted: margins nearly smooth, yet in all other respects the same.

 

[Brachythecium salebrosum (Hoffmann ex F. Weber & D. Mohr) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 20. 1853  (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum salebrosum Hoffmann ex F. Weber & D. Mohr, Bot. Taschenbuch, 312. 1807

 

Hypnum salebrosum Hoffmann ex F. Weber & D. Mohr

Brachythecium flexicaule Renauld & Cardot (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(Synonymy for Brachythecium salebrosum from earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Brachythecium laevisetum Kindb. in Macoun

Hypnum salebrosum Web. & Mohr

 

Not reported for Wyoming, but anticipated; “Brachythecium salebrosum was considered widespread in North America, but a revision of herbarium collections from eastern North America demonstrated mostly B. acutum, B. campestre, B. rotaeanum, and marginal phenotypes of B. laetum among these.  However, plants of B. salebrosum that are identical with European plants occur in western North America and, probably, in eastern Canada” (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

All of the following specimens would need to be reviewed to the species as presented in FNA Vol. 28, 2014); its presence is to be anticipated.

 

(As B. flexicaule) Yellowstone, Porter l937. (As B. flexicaule) Mammoth, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935.

 

LINCOLN CO.: on rotted wood on bank of Porcupine Creek on spruce-fir slope, Greys River Valley, 6600 ft., Salt River Range, 18 miles SE Alpine Junction, Hermann 25595 (Aug. 30, 1973: capsules gone but setae abundant) (US, RM). PARK CO.: wet soil in white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1743 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, ss rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley, shaded sandstone rock, July 5, 1985 P.M. Eckel 9612515 (BUF, RM). + Drepanocladus uncinatus, Leptodictyum humile, Eurhynchiastrum  pulchellum, Platydictya jungermannioides. TETON CO: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris c.fr. July 6, 1985, c. Distichium capillacium, Aulacomnium palustre, Eckel 94082102 (BUF); dry humus in spruce-fir woods, Hidden Falls Trail NW of Jenny Lake, 7000ft, Hermann 25547 (RM), young sporph. Aug. 29, 1973 (serrate lf tips, teeth on costa, revolute to apex, however). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: on the moist ground in the timber, The Thunderer, Plants of Yellowstone National Park 5812, Nelson & Nelson, July 13, 1899 (RM; US); Lost Lake outlet, H. S. Conard 48-225 (YELLO) Sept. 1, 1948 (det. as B. glareosum-autoicous); Clematis Gulch Trail, Lawton 1801 (YELLO) Aug. 16, 1953 (det. as B. glareosum-autoicous).

 

Robust, densely foliose, turgid branches, much branched, straw colored: yellow/yellow-brown. It is easy to see in this specimen how B. turgidum may be a short-branched form of this (Crum & Anderson). In the Teton Co. (PME) specimen, the stems were a bright red-burgundy and the fruiting female buds kept popping off. There were no serrations at all on either stem or branch leaves. On the Hermann spm. from Teton, the margins were strongly serrate at the tip, the costa toothed, both margins recurved to apex, the leaf canaliculate. Lawton & Crum & Anderson do not describe the leaf this way - but Flowers does. Flowers may have had a big problem with the genus (note B. oxycladon, digastrum & campestre). Also, a specimen from Sublette Co. had striking, long filiform acuminations, such as B. albicans has. Flowers again illustrates an acuminate apex for B. salebrosum, otherwise it would be hard to believe the Sublette spm. for B. salebrosum. All leaves, stem and branch, were serrulate, the sex was autoicous and the apex was channeled with revolute borders. There doesn't seem to be anything else in the key that this specimen could be. Some leaves had decurrencies and excavate enlarged alar cells. Sometimes B. salebrosum can be so plicate it seems like a Homalothecium, however, that genus is all dioicous.

 

Brachythecium starkei (Brid.) Schimp. in B.S.G. = Sciuro-hypnum starkei   (Bridel) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

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Brachythecium turgidum (Hartman) Kindberg, Vidensk. Meddel. Naturhist. Foren. Kjøbenhavn, ser. 4, 9: 294. 1888 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum salebrosum var. turgidum Hartman, Handb. Skand. Fl. ed. 3, 2: 309. 1838 

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn. along WY 11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23232 (NY). PARK CO.: snowbeds, 3200 msm, W. A. Weber, B-44306 (COLO, RM, US) [leaves short, dense on stem, to julaceous].

 

Note Crum & Anderson suggest this may be only an ecological expression of B. salebrosum. Tufted habit means the branches are short and hence the leaves crowded making short fat branches of a bright shiny golden to lemon yellow plant with brown along the lower leaves and stems. They sort of stand up at you in tight little bristly julaceous branches as you look down on them, wetted up, in the packet, with your dissecting microscope. The Weber specimen shows longer branches, but distinctly julaceous: the bright lemon or straw yellow with brown older parts of B. salebrosum. Both have the alar thick-walled pellucid cell groups.

 

Brachythecium velutinum (Hedw.) Schimper = Brachytheciastrum velutinum  (Hedwig) Ignatov & Huttunen var. velutinum

 

Brachythecium velutinum var. venustum (De Not.) Arc. = Brachytheciastrum velutinum var. salicinum (Schimper) Ochyra & Żarnowiec

 

    

[Breutelia mohriana (C. Muell.) Broth., excluded ]

 

Carbon Co., Porter, 1937. Excluded from N American flora by Anderson, et al. 1990. The genus is not reported for North America (Griffin, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).]

 

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[Brotherella recurvans (Michaux) M. Fleischer, Nova Guinea 12: 120. 1914 (Sematophyllaceae)

Leskea recurvans Michaux, Fl. Bor.-Amer. 2: 311. 1803

 

Not reported for Wyoming; a species with an eastern distribution (Schofield; FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Lincoln Gulch, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 2628). “The material is scanty, and Prof. Holzinger, who identified it, expressed a doubt as to the correctness of the determination,” Porter, 1935.]

 

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BRYOERYTHROPHYLLUM P. C. Chen, Hedwigia 80: 4. 1941 (Pottiaceae)

 

Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum (Hedwig) P. C. Chen, Hedwigia 80: 5. 1941(Pottiaceae) unillo

Weissia recurvirostra Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 71. 1801

 

Barbula recurvirostra var. latinervia Holmen;

Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum var. dentatum (Schimper) H. A. Crum, Steere & L. E. Anderson;

Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum var. latinervium (Holmen) B. M. Murray;

Didymodon recurvirostrum var. dentatus(Schimper) Steere (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Barbula aenea C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Barbula recurvirostris (Hedw.) Dix.

Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum (Hedw.) Chen

Didymodon canadensis Kindb. in Macoun

Didymodon recurvirostris (Hedw.) Jenn.

Didymodon rubellus B.S.G

Didymodon rubellus var. dentatus Schimp.

Didymodon subruber Kindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; widespread in the Middle West and in eastern North America, Greenland and Labrador to North Carolina.

 

(As Didymodon rubellus (Hoffm.) B.S.G.) Pole Creek, Albany Co. (Elias Nelson, 3438), Yellowstone Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO., Hermann 17145, 10,000 ft.; moist shaded soil at base of calcareous sandstone bluff, Roger Canyon, alt. ca. 8000 ft., 10 miles NE of Laramie, F. J. Hermann 171512 1/2, August 19, 1961 (DUKE). (RM). BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., large rock outcrop, 9200 ft., Nelson 3332, c. fr., old-calyptrate, indehisced July 9, 1979 (BUF, RM). CAMPBELL CO.: S.E., Rochelle Hills, head of Wildcat and S. Fork Keyton Creeks, T 41 N, R 69 W, Sec. 11, 12, 1500-1550 m. alt.; natural brick and sandstone of Fort Union formation, Pinus ponderosa-Juniperus-sagebrush associations; on N slope just above temporary stream in ravine, W. A. Weber 5-8 June 1975 (COLO) [det. as Barbula unguiculata], Powder River Basin coal strip mine ecological impact inventory. CARBON CO.: Hermann, 17190, 8500 ft., (RM). FREMONT CO.: Dubois, big spring about 4 miles east of Dubois, Frye, June 23, 1931, c.fr. (WTU); 8,400', Hermann 25513 (RM). PARK CO.: 6900-7800 ft., 21090 (BUF, RM); Lake Creek at Cody Road, west of Bear Tooth Butte, Ela Lawton 2093 (WTU) Aug. 24, 1953. SHERIDAN CO.: Moist limestone, Big Horn Mountains, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-007, June 16, 1992, c.fr. indehisced (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO., 7950', Hermann 25341 (RM). TETON CO. 7,000', Hermann 25575 (RM); east of Teton Pass, Elva Lawton, 1781 (WTU) Aug. 15, 1953. WESTON CO.: Dryish hill, on ground, Newcastle, July 16, 1942, c.fr., Otto Degener & Leroy Peiler (NY), with Desmatodon obtusifolius. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Yellowstone Lake shoreline, limestone, Zander & Eckel, July 23, 1980 (BUF); Crescent Hill, Elva Lawton 1843 (WTU) Aug. 17, 1953.

 

BRYUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 178, plate 42, figs. 8–12; plates 43, 44. 1801 (Bryaceae)

 

BRYUM:

I find that there are four species that readily come to hand, all with long awns and appendiculate cilia. Their sexuality and habit I have found useful in distinguishing them: Bryum caespiticium (now Gemmabryum caespiticium): Stems short: central bulb “on the ground” with side shoots terminated by bulbs [“bulb” = rosulate but in a tear drop figure]. DIOICOUS. Walls may be thin. There are no gametoecia at the tips of side branches (hence, sterile) as there almost always are in B. pallescens, the sp. with which this may be confused. The stems are not elongate, or if they are the rosulate leaf clump is subtended by reduced leaves distant on the stem, not foliose as in B. pallescens.

 

Bryum pallescens: Stems elongate, the leafy area elevated off the ground and leafy with numerous side branches: a “typical” looking plant. Dioicous (male stems). Cladautoicous: with antheridia on branches of fruiting stems, and frequently synoicous, that is, with a few antheridia amid the archegonia. [B. algovicum with its unique “gloppy” peristome (adherent endo and exostome, also is branched and NON ROSULATE, with similar sexuality].

 

Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum: less diffusely branched, but apparently always synoicous. ROSULATE. Note B. pallescens is not; B. caespiticium is, but is dioicous. B. caespiticium resembles bulbs but B. lisae seems to flare out like a cup: each stalk is ended in synoici (unlike pallescens which is more often than not male). B. caespiticium LOOKS like it has branches, but each of the little side things has rhizoids with male things, so they are not branches and hence dioicous. B. pallescens has actual branches attached to the stem with male things, and so are autoicous. Rosulabryum capillare with thin, lax cell walls, resembling B. caespiticium. Note it is only the fruiting stems that have long-awned leaves. Leaves here are obovate.

 

Bryum algovicum Sendtn. ex C. Muell. = Ptychostomum pendulum Hornschuch

 

Bryum alpinum Huds. ex With. = Imbribryum alpinum   (Hudson ex Withering) N. Pedersen

 

Bryum amblyodon C. Muell. = Ptychostomum inclinatum (Swartz ex Brid.) J. R. Spence

 

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Bryum argenteum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 181. 1801    var. argenteum (Bryaceae)

 

Argyrobryum argenteum (Hedw.) Kindb.

[Bryum argenteum var. lanatum (P. Beauv.) Hampe = Bryum lanatum (P. Beauv. Brid. q.v. (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)]

Mnium lanatum P. Beauv.

Plagiobryum argenteoides Williams

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Cosmopolitan and common. Laramie, Albany Co. (Elias Nelson, 3454); Crow Creek, Albany County (Porter, 1446), Porter, 1935. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie, E. Nelson 3454 (RM); Laramie Plains, 2 air miles NE of Laramie center, Chugwater redbeds, rim of breaks, 7250-7300 ft. bare prairie soil between herbs, including Astragalus, Eriogonum, Penstemon, N.G.Miller 10, 250 (NYS) June 7, 1993, with Tortula caninervis. SHERIDAN CO.: Decaying conifer wood, Big Horn Mountains, T57N, R89W, McKee 92-F6, June 19, 1992 (RM).

 

Bryum argenteum Hedw. var. lanatum (P. Beauv.) Hampe = Bryum lanatum (P. Beauv.) Brid. (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Bryum bimum Schreb. ex Brid. = Ptychostomum bimum (Schreber) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum caespiticium Hedw. = Gemmabryum caespiticium (Hedw.) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum erythroloma (Kindberg) Syed = Rosulabryum erythroloma (Kindberg) J. R. Spence, a Pacific Coast species not likely to be found in Wyoming (Spence in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Bryum canariense Bridel = Rosulabryum canariense (Bridel) Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al.

 

Bryum capillare Hedw. = Rosulabryum capillare (Hedwig) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum creberrimum Taylor = Ptychostomum creberrimum  (Taylor) R. Spence & H. P. Hamsay (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Bryum cyclophyllum (Schwaegr.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. = Ptychostomum cyclophyllum (Schwägrichen) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum dichotomum Hedw. = Gemmabryum dichotomum (Hedw.) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum flaccidum Brid. = Rosulabryum flaccidum (Brid.) J. R. Spence, q.v.

 

Bryum gemmiparum DeNot. = Imbribryum gemmiparum (DeNot.) J. R. Spence

 

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Bryum lanatum  (P. Beauvois) Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 3: 20. 1817  (Bryaceae) unillo

Mnium lanatum P. Beauvois, Prodr. Aethéogam., 75. 1805

 

 Bryum argenteum var. lanatum (P. Beauvois) Hampe

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum (B.S.G.) Marg. = Ptychostomum creberrimum (Taylor) J. R. Spence & H. P. Hamsay (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

The specimen listed as Bryum occidentale Sulliv. Bridger Peak, Carbon Co. (Goodding 1966) by Porter (1935) was seen to be Bryum caespiticium in both the specimen at RM and US. Bryum occidentale does not occur under the Bryaceae (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Bryum pallens (Brid.) Sw. in Roel. = Ptychostomum pallens (Swartz) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum pallescens Schleich. ex Schwägr. = Ptychostomum pallescens (Schleicher ex Schwägrichen) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum pseudotriquetrum (Hedw.) Gaertn., Meyer & Scherb. var. bimum (Schreb. ex Brid.) Lilj. = Ptychostomum bimum (Schreber) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum pseudotriquetrum (Hedw.) Gaertn., Meyer & Scherb. = Ptychostomum pseudotriquetrum (Hedwig) J. R. Spence & H. P. Ramsay ex Holyoak & N. Pedersen

 

 

 

Bryum sandbergii Holz. = Roellobryon roellii (Brotherus) Ochyra

 

Bryum stenotrichum C. Muell. = Ptychostomum inclinatum (Swartz ex Brid.) J. R. Spence .

 

Bryum tortifolium Funck in Brid. = Ptychostomum cyclophyllum (Schwägrichen) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum torquescens Bruch ex De Notaris = Rosulabryum torquescens (Bruch ex De Notaris) J. R. Spence, q.v.

 

Bryum turbinatum (Hedw.) Turn. = Ptychostomum turbinatum (Hedwig) J. R. Spence

 

Bryum uliginosum (Brid.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. = Ptychostomum cernuum   (Hedwig) Hornschuch

 

Bryum weigelii Spreng. in Biehler = Ptychostomum weigelii (Sprengel) J. R. Spence,

 

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BUCKLANDIELLA Roivainen, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 9: 116. 1972  (Grimmiaceae)

 

Bucklandiella macounii (Kindberg in Macoun) Bednarek-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al., Cens. Cat. Polish Mosses, 146. 2003  (Grimmiaceae)

Racomitrium brevipes Kindberg , Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 16: 93. 1889

 

Racomitrium brevipes Kindb.

Racomitrium heterostichum var. macounii (Kindb.) G. N. Jones

Racomitrium robustifolium Kindb.

 

Only the subsp. macounii is reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

[Bucklandiella sudetica (Funck) Bednarek-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al., Cens. Cat. Polish Mosses, 147. 2003 (Grimmiaceae)

Trichostomum sudeticum Funck, Deutschl. Moose, 26. 1820;

 

Campylopus sudeticus (Funck) Fürnrohr.

Racomitrium heterostichum var. sudeticum (Funck) Dixon

Racomitrium jensenii Kindberg

Racomitrium  sudeticum (Funck) Bruch & Schimper

Racomitrium sudeticum [unranked] papillosum C. E. O. Jensen;

R. sudeticum var. alaskanum Cardot & Thériot (FNA Vol. 27, 2077)

 

The following reports (as Racomitrium sudeticum (Funck) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G.) are perhaps some other species, as Bucklandiella sudetica is not reported for Wyoming in FNA 2007.

 

(As Racomitrium sudeticum) Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

(All as Racomitrium sudeticum) PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, Cooke City to Red Lodge Highway; swales around small lakes, subalpine zone between Long Lake and lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm; over irrigated rocks, small cascades between lakes, 19 Aug. 1973, Weber B-44279 (COLO, WTU) (this specimen approached f. brevipes (Kindb.) Lawt. See discussion in Crum & Anderson p. 450 sub R. heterostichum var. microcarpon. There are no varieties in the 1990 checklist.]]

 

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Buxbaumia spp. (Buxbaumiaceae)

 

  No species of the genus Buxbaumia was reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, collected by H. S. Conard. No specimen seen (Porter, 1935).

 

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BUXBAUMIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 166. 1801 (Buxbaumiaceae)

 

Buxbaumia aphylla Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 166. 1801 (Buxbaumiaceae)   unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: about 7 miles from Canyon Lodge on road to Norris, Aug. 29, 1951, c. fr., E. Lawton, 1505 (WTU).

 

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Buxbaumia viridis (de Candolle) de Candolle in J. B. Mougeot et al., Stirp. Crypt. Vogeso-Rhen. 8: no. 724. 1823  (Buxbaumiaceae)  unillo

Buxbaumia aphylla var. viridis de Candolle in J. Lamarck and A. P. de Candolle, Fl. Franç. ed. 3, 6: 227.

1815 

 

Buxbaumia indusiata Brid.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states.. of the Pacific Northwest..not common. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

LINCOLN CO.: on well-rotted log in partial clearing on spruce- fir slope along Porcupine Creek, Greys River Valley, 6600', Salt River Range, 18 miles SE, Alpine Junction, Aug. 30, 1973, c.fr., F. J. Hermann, 25593 (WTU).

 

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CALLIERGON (Sullivant) Kindberg, Canad. Rec. Sci. 6: 72. 1894 (Calliergonaceae)

 

Calliergon cordifolium (Hedwig) Kindberg, Canad. Rec. Sci. 6: 72. 1894  (Calliergonaceae)

Hypnum cordifolium Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 254. 1801 

 

Calliergon cordifolium (Hedw.) Kindb.

Calliergon cordifolium f. intermedium Grout

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming; “Calliergon cordifolium is most frequently confused with the dioicous C. giganteum when the latter species does not form its characteristic miniature sprucelike shoots” (Hedenäs, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley); Carbon County (Porter, 1694), Porter, 1935. Carbon Co., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

PARK CO.: wet soil in white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft J. C. Elliott 1778 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. CARBON CO.: Stampmill Lake, with Sphagnum in an alpine bog mat, 10,000 ft., C.L. Porter 2084 (TENN); near Silver Lake, mixed with Sphagnum in a floating mat in a bog, 10,000 ft., Porter 1694 (TENN).

 

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Calliergon giganteum (Schimper) Kindberg, Canad. Rec. Sci. 6: 72. 1894  (Calliergonaceae)

Hypnum giganteum Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur., 642. 1860

 

Hypnum giganteum Schimper

Calliergon subsarmentosum Kindberg

Hypnum cyclophyllotum Holzinger (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming; “Plants of Calliergon giganteum frequently resemble miniature spruce trees because of dense and successively longer branches from the shoot apex downwards, regular radial branching, and somewhat spreading branch leaves” (Hedenäs, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

ALBANY CO.: 8500 ft., Hermann 25607, (RM) and Sturges #251, 9700 ft., (RM); NW base of Sheep Mtn. along WY 11, ca. 4 air mi ESE of Centennial, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula, Salix, Buck 23240 (NY); ca. 4 air miles E-SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY11, 7700-7900 ft., Populus, Betula, and Salix associated with spring seep; open fen, N. G. Miller 10, 274 (NYS) June 7, 1993.

 

See note at genus start regarding variability of the costa in branch leaves for this species. Only the stem leaves consistently reach the apex or apical region.

 

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Calliergon richardsonii (Mitten) Kindberg, Eur. N. Amer. Bryin. 1: 80. 1897 (as richardsoni) (Calliergonaceae)

Stereodon richardsonii Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 42. 1864 (as richardsoni);

 

Stereodon richardsonii Mitten

Calliergon macounii Karczmarz

Calliergon obtusifolium Karczmarz

Calliergon subgiganteum Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(Synonymy from the earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Calliergon subgiganteum Kindb.

Hypnum richardsonii (Mitt.) Lesq. & James

Stereodon richardsonii Mitt.

 

Wyoming; “Calliergon richardsonii is easily separated from other members of Calliergon by its comparatively short, usually branched or 2-fid stem leaf costa” (Hedenäs, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Crum & Anderson p. 1003, mention a report from Wyoming, but did not see a specimen. Perhaps they are referring to Lawton's citation.

 

Calliergon sarmentosum (Wahlenb.) Kindb. = Sarmenthypnum sarmentosum (Wahlenberg) Tuomikoski & T. J. Koponen

 

Calliergon stramineum (Brid.) Kindb. = Straminergon stramineum (Dickson ex Bridel) Hedenäs

 

Calliergon trifarium (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Kindberg = Pseudocalliergon trifarium   (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Loeske

 

Calliergon turgescens (T. Jens.) Kindb. = Pseudocalliergon turgescens (T. Jens.) Loeske

 

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CALLIERGONELLA Loeske, Hedwigia 50: 248. 1911  (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Calliergonella cuspidata (Hedwig) Loeske, Hedwigia 50: 248. 1911 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum cuspidatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 254. 1801; Calliergon cuspidatum (Hedwig) Kindberg

 

Hypnum cuspidatum Hedwig

Calliergon cuspidatum (Hedwig) Kindberg (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(From earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Calliergonella conardii Lawt.

Acrocladium cuspidatum (Hedw.) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Hypnum cuspidatum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1579) (Roell 1893).

Ireland, 1982. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

PARK CO.: (with Hygrohypnum styriacum specimen, q.v.):  Beartooth Lake, W and SW shore, Picea engelmannii forest along the shore, on wet clay, assoc.: Sanionia uncinata, Calliergonella cuspidata, T57N R105W S6&7, 44̊56.500-520’N, 109̊35.980-990’W, elev. ca. 8,900 ft (2700 m), 24 Jul 2010 Kosovich-Anderson 6652 [no herb. cited]; YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Lost Lake, Aug. 17, 1953, E. Lawton 1821 (isotype, WTU); with Dichelyma uncinata, Lost Lake near Roosevelt Lodge, Aug. 28, 1951, E. Lawton 1495 (WTU); 9 miles south of Madison Junction, Aug. 29, 1951, E. Lawton 1512 (WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Black Sand Basin, Aug. 18, 1953, E. Lawton, 1866 (WTU).

 

Note: Crum apparently has a specimen from Wyoming. see p. 1012. This species may be confused with Hygrohypnum ochraceum in its softer, non calcium-encrusted forms, but that species may be distinguished by the much longer forked costa extending to the leaf middle and somewhat beyond, whereas C. cuspidata's costae are short.

 

Camptothecium lutescens (Hedw.) Schimp. in B.S.G. = Homalothecium lutescens (Hedw.) Robinson, q.v. Excluded from North America (1990 checklist and FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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CAMPYLIADELPHUS (Kindberg) R. S. Chopra, Taxon. Indian Mosses, 442. 1975 (Amblystegiaceae)

Campyliadelphus chrysophyllus (Bridel) Kanda, J. Sci. Hiroshima Univ., Ser. B, Div. 2, Bot. 15: 264. 1976 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum chrysophyllum Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 84, plate 2, fig. 2. 1801

 

Campylium chrysophyllum (Bridel) Lange

Campylium chrysophyllum var. brevifolium (Renauld & Cardot) Grout

Hypnum chrysophyllum var. brevifolium Renauld & Cardot (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(All as Campylium chrysophyllum ) ALBANY CO.: 8500 ft., F.J. Hermann 17773 (RM); ca. 4 air miles E- SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY11, 7700-7900 ft. Populus, Betula, and Salix associated with spring seep; fen area, on soil bank, N.G. Miller 10,277 (NYS) June 7, 1993, with Leptobryum pyriforme and Hennediella heimii. NATRONA CO.; S of I25, take Center St. to Wolcott St to Casper Mtn. Drive WY252. Rotary Club Park in N-slope foothills of mtn. Wooded creek ravine. Salix, Ribes, Alnus. Granite rocks; with Cratoneuron filicinum. July 7, 1985, Eckel 94100400 (BUF). SWEETWATER CO.: ca. 6,4000', on US(187)191 at 14-Mile Reservoir picnic area, US Dept. Interior, wet wooden bridge over brooklet, shaded ravine in Artemisia scrubland, with Hennediella heimii, July 5, 1985 PM Eckel 212086 (BUF). TETON CO.: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris, with Drepanocladus aduncus, Distichium capillaceum, Aulacomnium palustre, Brachythecium salebrosum, Cratoneuron filicinum, July 6, 1985 Eckel 94082108 (BUF). WESTON CO.: Beaver Creek, Aven Nelson 2563 (RM).

 

(As Campylium chrysophyllum ) See notes under Amblystegium trichopodium: “Campylium hispidulum which is similar differs by the more conspicuous dentition, the channeled apex, the more abruptly acuminate condition from a broader base, the more slender apex, sometimes short-filiform often reflexed or bent backward.” Campylium chrysophyllum is strongly channeled in the apex and with more strongly falcate leaf tips again more abruptly acuminate. The costa is stronger, more than 1/2 the leaf length.

 

CAMPYLIUM (Sullivant) Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 12: 631. 1869 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum sect. Campylium Sullivant in A. Gray, Manual ed. 2, 677. 1856

 

CAMPYLIUM

Note that species of Campylium seem to approach the appearance of Conardia compacta in the Amblystegiaceae - that species has long almost vermicular leaf cells rather than the boxy cells of the Amblystegiaceae generally. That species also has a longer costa than in any species of Campylium which goes to the leaf middle or somewhat above. Also Conardia compacta has distinctive irregular serrations at the basal margins.

 

Campylium chrysophyllum (Brid.) J. Lange = Campyliadelphus chrysophyllus (Bridel) Kanda

 

Campylium hispidulum (Brid.) Mitt. = Campylophyllum hispidulum   (Bridel) Hedenäs

 

Campylium polygamum (Schimp. in B.S.G.) C. Jens. = Drepanocladus polygamus (Schimper) Hedenäs

 

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Campylium protensum (Bridel) Kindberg, Canad. Rec. Sci. 6: 72. 1894   (Amblystegiaceae)  unillo

Hypnum protensum Bridel, Muscol. Recent. 2(2): 85, plate 2, fig. 3. 1801

 

Campyliadelphus protensus (Bridel) Kanda

Campylium stellatum var. protensum (Bridel) Bryhn

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Campylium stellatum (Hedwig) C. E. O. Jensen, Meddel. Grønland 3: 328. 1887 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum stellatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 280. 1801

 

Campyliadelphus stellatus (Hedwig) Kanda

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Beaver Creek, Weston County, (Aven Nelson, 2556), Porter, 1935. Weston Co., Porter, 1937. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: peaty vertical bank of streamlet in mtn. meadow, 1 1/4 miles S of Brooklyn Lake, alt. 10,000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts, 9 miles W of Centennial, Hermann, 17679 1/2 (RM). CARBON CO.: wet, rocky edge of Trail Creek, W. of Sand Lake Rd, alt. 9000 ft., Medicine Bow Mountains, 4 1/2 miles SW of Morgan, Hermann 17807 (RM). PARK CO.: wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1716 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake, R. Andrus 7786 (BING). WESTON CO.: Beaver Creek, Aven Nelson 2556 (RM).

 

Two other varieties are var. arcticum (Williams) Sav.-Ljub. and var. protensum (Brid.) Bryhn [1990 checklist].

 

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CAMPYLOPHYLLUM (Schimper) M. Fleischer, Nova Guinea 12: 123. 1914  (Amblystegiaceae)

  Hypnum subg. Campylophyllum Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur. ed. 2, 721. 1876

 

Campylophyllum hispidulum (Bridel) Hedenäs, Bryologist 100: 74. 1997 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum hispidulum Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 2: 198. 1812

 

Campylium hispidulum (Bridel) Mitten

Campylium hispidulum var. cordatum Grout

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Campylium hispidulum) Cooper Hill, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 4296); Beaver Creek, Weston County (Aven Nelson, 2563), Porter, 1935. Albany, Weston cos., Porter, 1937.

 

(As Campylium hispidulum) ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., Medicine Bow National Forest, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, 2660 msm, Buck 23189 (NY), (in specimen labeled Amblystegium serpens, with Brachythecium cirrosum , associated with rotten wood).

 

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CAMPYLOPUS Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 4: 71. 1818  (Dicranaceae)

 

Campylopus fragilis (Bridel) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 1: 164. 1847 .   unillo

Dicranum fragile Bridel, J. Bot.(Schrader) 1800: 296. 1801

 

Campylopus citrescens Stirt.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007, where it is noted only from British Columbia and “a single locality in Arkansas” (Frahm, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Wyoming; Florida. (Crum & Anderson have excluded this taxon from the Eastern North American flora p.218).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: about 5 miles from Canyon Lodge, road to Norris, Aug. 29, 1951, E. Lawton 1498 (WTU).

 

Note: this specimen is differentiated from Campylopus schimperi Milde by the presence of stereid cells on the dorsal side of the costa in section, whereas C. schimperi's cells are said to be too wide to qualify as stereids. Campylopus schimperi is smooth on the back of the costa (Crum & Anderson), whereas C. fragilis has ridges (Smith, 1978).

 

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Campylopus schimperi Milde, Bot. Zeitung (Berlin)  22: 13. 1864  (Dicranaceae)

Campylopus subulatus var. schimperi (Milde) Husnot

 

Not reported in FNA Vol. 27, 2007.

 

PARK. CO., SNF, Beartooth Plateau, Little Bear Lake vicinity, subalpine aapamire fen crossed by U.S. Hwy 212, Carex spp. - Sphagnum warnstorfii Russ. + Aulacomnium palustre ...,  in pure mats on saturated soil at base of low hummock around swale; T57N, R105W, S11, 44̊56.260-290’N, 109̊30.920-950’W, elev. ca. 9,550 ft (2910 m), 16 August 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 2896 (BONN, MO, RM) in Kosovich-Anderson 2011a.

 

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Campylopus talluensis Sullivant & Lesquereux, Musci Bor.-Amer. ed. 2, 17. 1865     (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Yellowstone Park, Heart Lake, hot water formation, Streeler s.n. (DUKE).

 

Campylopus tallulensis occurs in southeastern North America in Virginia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Arkansas, Alabama, Ohio and Louisiana with disjunct occurrences in the west in southern Arizona and Wyoming. It is also known from Mexico - where it is rather common, Bolivia and Colombia. This distribution pattern in southeastern United States, Mexico and northern South America, which is characteristic of other bryophytes and flowering plants, is considered indicative of Tertiary relictual status (Crum 1951 dissertation). Because of confusions with C. flexuosus, the total range of C. tallulensis is not yet sufficiently known.” Frahm 1980).

 

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CERATODON Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 480. 1826  (Ditrichaceae)

 

Ceratodon purpureus (Hedwig) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1:480. 1826     unillo 

  subsp. purpureus 

Dicranum purpureum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 136, plate 36. 1801

 

Ceratodon columbiae Kindb.

Ceratodon conicus (Hampe) Lindb.

Ceratodon purpurascens (Hedwig) Jennings

Ceratodon  purpureus var. purpurascens (Hedwig) Bridel

Ceratodon purpureus var. xanthopus Sullivant

Dicranum purpurascens Hedw.

Trichostomum conicum Hampe in C. Muell.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

A weedy species found in almost every type of habitat, on soil, soil over rock, etc., in the Pacific Northwest on shaded roofs of houses in the city; cosmopolitan, extremely common, widespread throughout the United States and Canada.

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, 7000’ (1448) (Roell 1893).  As Ceratodon minor Aust. Yellowstone Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935. [Ceratodon minor = Ceratodon purpureus var. conicus (Hamp.) Husn. cf. Dix. Stud. Handb. Brit. Moss. 69. 1896. Index Muscorum which in the new checklist (Anderson, et al. 1990) = var. purpureus.] Common throughout most of the State; Albany County, Carbon, Crook, Johnson, Sheridan, Teton Counties and Yellowstone National Park, Porter 1935. “Common in front of glaciers”, Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8,500', Lichvar 1339 (RM); 10,500,' 1328 (RM). BIGHORN CO: with USA, Wyoming, Big Horn Co., just off US16 between TenSleep & Buffalo (near Sitting Bull Campsite). Pinus contorta v. latifolia being lumbered. Just N of Washakie Co. border. ca. 5000' Disturbed soil, Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum July 6, 1985 Eckel 94092201 (BUF, RM). CARBON CO.: [in specimen of Desmatodon latifolius], rotted wood in soil in lodgepole pine woods along Trail Creek, Sand Lake Rd., alt 9000 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 4.5 miles SW Morgan, F. J. Hermann 17813 (WTU). CROOK CO.: Devils Tower Natl. monument, summit of Devils Tower, M. Fortney, July, 1990 (BUF, NY). JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn Mtns. along middle fork Crazy Woman Creek, stream bank, 8200 ft., Nelson 3584, in packet of Bryum pallescens. FREMONT CO.: Frye June 23, 1931, (RM). PARK CO.: 6000ft., Vukelich April 1, 1988 (BUF). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 17/viii/1989 ca. 1.5 mile east of Barnes Lake, 10,080 ft. elev. 42°58'W, 109°34'W. Thin peat terrace. Richard Andrus 7866 (BING). WESTON CO.: PM Eckel 523686 (RM, BUF). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, T.C.Frye Aug. 14, l925 (RM); Yellowstone Park, Taylor #67-161 (RM); Yellowstone National Park between Old Faithful and Madison near Great Fountain in Pinus contorta-forest in northern exposures beside Geisir at bottom of forest, primitive rocks about 2460 msm, Duell 2265 (BUF).

 

Separate from Cynodontium leaves by having no papillae, even on the margins; from those of Oncophorus by not being subulate and by being strongly revolute nearly to the apex; from Dicranoweisia species by either being recurved or not bistratose anywhere; from Ditrichum species by the non-subulate, non-awned leaves, by never being bistratose and by being recurved; [Rhabdoweisia only occurs in the eastern US]. When it has sharp pointed teeth at the apex; it is not a Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum since the leaf cells are smooth (not papillose). B. recurv. hasn't got the deep channel near the apex and B. recuv. has elongate hyaline thin-walled basal cells, which C. purpureus does not.

 

Ceratodon purpureus var. dimorphus (Philib.) Moenk., is not recognized in FNA Vol. 27, 2007.

 

LINCOLN CO.: basalt outcrop, alt 6700 ft., F. J. Hermann 25597 (RM).

 

This name is the same as C. purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. var. purpureus [1990 checklist]

 

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CINCLIDIUM Swartz, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1801(1): 27, plate 2. 1803 (Mniaceae)

 

Cinclidium stygium Swartz, J. Bot. (Schrader) 1801(1): 27, plate 2. 1803     

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

PARK CO.: wet marl in calcareous fen complex at the base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, Shoshone Natl. Forest, 6,600 ft. J. C. Elliott 1732 (BUF, NYS) Aug. 12, 1990.

 

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Cirriphyllum cirrosum (Schwaegr. in Schultes) Grout = Brachythecium cirrosum (Schwägrichen) Schimper

 

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CLIMACIUM F. Weber & D. Mohr in F. Weber, Naturh. Reise Schweden, 96. 1804 (Climaceaceae)

 

CLIMACIUM

Climacium americanum: stem leaf apices acuminate, same as the branch leaves, BRANCH leaves auriculate.

 

Climacium dendroides: stem leaf apices obtuse & apiculate, different from the branch leaves; BRANCH leaves not or little auriculate.

 

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Climacium americanum Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 2: 45. 1812

 

Climacium americanum subsp. kindbergii (Renauld & Cardot) Kindberg

Climacium americanum var. kindbergii Renauld & Cardot

Climacium americanum var. pseudokindbergii Cardot & Thériot;

Climacium kindbergii (Renauld & Cardot) Grout

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Lawton, 1971, does not distinguish C. americanum as separate from C. dendroides. “Specimens from Wyoming have been determined as C. americanum, and it is found in central and eastern North America as far south as Tennessee,” p. 235.

 

Centennial, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 1724), Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake [auriculate lvs, short cells]. Richard Andrus 7800 (BING)

 

(As Climacium kindbergii) “In a small peat bog,” Carbon County (Porter, 1752), Porter, 1935.

 

(As Climacium kindbergii) This taxon is now accepted in the North American Checklist (Anderson, et al. 1990). Crum & Anderson, 1981, had regarded it as only a response to inundation, with plants long and trailing “somewhat like a Fontinalis is field appearance. The branching is irregular. The leaves are broadly rounded at the base but not particularly auriculate, the upper cells are rhombic and only about 2 - 4: 1, and a few large, lax cells are found in the alar region.” p. 1231.

 

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Climacium dendroides (Hedwig) F. Weber & D. Mohr in F. Weber, Naturh. Reise Schweden, 96. 1804 (Climaceaceae)

Leskea dendroides Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 228. 1801

 

Climacium dendroides var. oregonense Renauld & Cardot

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1532) (Roell 1893).

In Park Co. Climacium dendroides forms a rich bryophyte community combined with Aulacomnium palustre, Hylocomium splendens, Elodium blandowii, Rhizomnium spp., Thuidium recognitum, Marchantia alpestris, [Thuidium recognitum, q.v.] and others “ (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

Yellowstone National Park, specimen number 1532 (Roell 1893). Albany County, Teton County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Albany, Carbon, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Sublette Co., Cooper & Andrus, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO., Sturges #250, (RM), 9700ft. CARBON CO.: on the floating mat of a peat bog, near Silver Lake, Medicine Bow Mtns. 10,500 ft., Porter 1752 (RM). JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn National Forest, Hunter Quadrant (A) Cloud Peak Wilderness Area. 8120 ft. T50N R81W, Sec. 29 August 20, 1992. wet area W of Circle Park Campground. Katherine Zacharkevics (BING). PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, swales around small lakes, subalpine zone twn Long Lake & lower Sheepherder Lakes, 2900 msm, Weber (COLO, RM). SUBLETTE CO. 10,324 ft., Holmes Rolston 85131 (Colo. St. U. Herb.). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: along the Yellowstone River just abov the Falls, on ground, Frye, July 7, 1934 (RM). [Albany Co.] Centennial Valley, A. Nelson 1724, Aug. 18, 1895 (RM).

 

 

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CONARDIA H. Robinson, Phytologia 33: 294. 1976 (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Conardia compacta (Hooker) H. Robinson, Phytologia 33: 295. 1976

Hypnum serpens var. compactum Hooker in T. Drummond, Musc. Amer., 188. 1828

 

Hypnum compactum Müller Hal.

Amblystegium americanum Grout

Amblystegium compactum (Müller Hal.) Austin

Amblystegium. dissitifolium Macoun & Kindberg

Amblystegium holzingeri (Grout) Grout

Amblystegium subcompactum Macoun & Kindberg

Brachythecium collinum var. holzingeri Grout

Rhynchostegiella compacta (Müller Hal.) Loeske

Rhynchostegiella compacta subsp. americana (Grout) Wijk & Margadant (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn, along WY 11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23249 (NY). FREMONT CO.: Dubois, Fish Hatchery, E. Lawton, Aug. 12, 1953, 1721, c. fr. (WTU). PARK CO.: wet soil in white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft J. C. Elliott 1941 (BUF) April 19, 1992. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Clematis Gulch Trail, E. Lawton, Aug. 16, 1953, 1784 c fr. (WTU).

 

Might be confused at first with Campylium because of the long, narrow leaf tips, but the costa here is longer - to the leaf tip to percurrent, which never happens in Campylium. Perhaps the most distinctive feature of this species are the marginal cells at the base which have sharp serrations which are heterogeneous in shape: one or two of which might appear to be recurved, and may be composed of the top of one cell and the base of the one above it.

 

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CODRIOPHORUS P. Beauvois, Mém. Soc. Linn. Paris 1: 445. 1822 (Grimmiaceae)

 

[Codriophorus acicularis (Hedwig) P. Beauvois, Mém. Soc. Linn, Paris 1: 445. 1823 (as aciculare)

Dicranum aciculare Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 135. 1801

 

Grimmia acicularis (Hedwig) Müller Hal.

Grimmia nevii Müller Hal.

Racomitrium aciculare (Hedwig) Bridel

Racomitrium nevii (Müller Hal.) S. Watson

Trichostomum aciculare (Hedwig) P. Beauvois (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Not reported for Wyoming but to be expected (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) in high elevations in the Rocky Mountains.

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1453) (Roell 1893).]

 

[Codriophorus fascicularis (Hedw.) Bed.-Ochyra & Ochyra in R. Ochyra et al. (Grimmiaceae)

 

Racomitrium fasciculare (Hedw.) Brid.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Racomitrium fasciculare)  “Jackson Lake, Teton County (Coulter, in 1872). No specimens of this species were found in the Rocky Mountain Herbarium, although the species is listed by Nelson (1900). “Has been reported for Wyoming as having been collected by Coulter in the northwest part of the State in 1872. No specimen of this collection has been seen by the writer, and it is believed that it should better be referred to the following species (R. canescens). (This) species is a plant of more northern range,” Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985, however, Spence cites Porter l935 for the occurrence of this species.

 

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COSCINODON Sprengel, Anleit. Kenntn. Gew. 3: 281. 1804  (Grimmiaceae)

 

Coscinodon calyptratus (Drummond) C. E. O. Jensen in N. C. Kindberg, Eur. N. Amer. Bryin. 2: 241. 1897   unillo

Grimmia calyptrata Drummond, Musc. Amer., 60. 1828

 

Coscinodon calyptratus (Hook.) C. Jens.in Kindb.

Coscinodon hookeri Hampe (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia calyptrata Hook. in Drumm.

Grimmia columbica Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Guembelia calyptrata (Hook.) C. Muell.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Colorado. Common on granite rocks, especially in the southern part of the State. Albany County (Porter, 1012, 480, 626), Sublette County (Porter, 1124), Porter, 1935. Weston Co., Wynne 1943. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: crevice in granite boulder in Lodgepole woods above Libby Creek Picnic Ground, Snowy Range, 8700 ft., 2 1/2 miles NW of Centennial, Hermann 24864 (RM), June 7, 1972; excellent specimen - Willow Creek, Elias Nelson 2917 (RM), May 22, 1897. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Natl. For., Lake Helen Quad., Cloud Peak Wilderness Area, 10,200 ft., Aug. 3, 1992, Katherine Zacharkevics (BING). LINCOLN CO.: tight dense polsters on boulder in Greys River, 7 miles S of Twin Creek, 6700 ft., Salt River Range, 44 miles SSE of Alpine Junction, Hermann 25605 (RM), Aug. 30, 1973. PLATTE CO.: PM Eckel 820386 (RM, BUF). PARK CO.: Parsons, June 10, 1990 (BUF, RH). SWEETWATER CO.: on the sides of a big rock, Bush Ranch, Aven Nelson 7092 (RM), June 10, 1900, exsiccat Plants of Wyoming (as Grimmia alpestrisSchleich. det Holz.). Species has large areas of cells that are sub-sinuose, including the basal region. Most striking perhaps is the broad base of the awn confluent with the upper lamina.

 

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CRATONEURON (Sullivant) Spruce, Cat. Musc., 21. 1867 (Amblystegiaceae)

 

CRATONEURON

You MUST find the filamentous paraphyllia on the stem or you will probably think you are looking at a Drepanocladus (whose paraphyllia, when you can see them, are oriented to the leaf bases, not general over the stem). Illustrations of this genus tend to emphasize the deltoid looking forms, but C. commutatum looks more often than not exactly like a Drepanocladus, with thick walled basal/alar cells. It has long leaf cells and can be subentire except perhaps at the base and tip of the leaf. Note also in Cratoneuron (commutatum) how thick and wiry the stem is, noticeable when you attempt to strip leaves off - the leaves like as not will shred themselves and discomfit you. Drepanocladus stems are softer and the leaves do not disintegrate so readily.

 

Cratoneuron commutatum (Hedw.) Roth = Palustriella commutata (Brid.) Ochyra, q.v.; excluded.

 

Cratoneuron commutatum var. falcatum (Brid.) Moenk. = Palustriella commutata (Brid.) Ochyra, q.v.; excluded.

 

Cratoneuron falcatum (Bridel) G. Roth = Palustriella falcata (Bridel) Hedenäs

 

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Cratoneuron filicinum (Hedwig) Spruce, Cat. Musc., 21. 1867

Hypnum filicinum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 285, plate 76, figs. 5–10. 1801

 

Amblystegium tenax var. spinifolium (Schimper) H. A. Crum & L. E. Anderson

Cratoneuron filicinum var. aciculinum (Müller Hal. & Kindberg) Grout (all FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Cratoneuron curvicaule (Jur.) G. Roth

Cratoneuron filicinum var. curvicaule (Jur.) Moenk.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Hypnum filicinum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1566a, 1850) (Roell 1893).

Albany County, Carbon County, Crook County, Sublette County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Albany, Crook, Sublette cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn., along WY 11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23231 (NY). CARBON CO.: Ferris Mts. in a packet at US of Bryum turbinatum, Elias Nelson 4978, July 25, 1898. CROOK CO., Aven Nelson, 1896 (RM). LINCOLN CO: 6400 ft. Hermann 25589 (RM). NATRONA CO.; S of I25, take Center St. to Wolcott St to Casper Mtn. Drive. WY252. Rotary Club Park in N- slope foothills of mtn. Wooded creek ravine. Salix, Ribes, Alnus. Granite. rocks; with Campylium chrysophyllum, July 7, 1985 Eckel 94100401 (BUF). PARK CO.: wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1720 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. TETON CO.: 7000 ft. Hermann 25563 (RM); on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters. wooded stream, soggy debris July 6, 1985, Eckel 94082105 (BUF) Care must be taken that this species is not confused with Drepanocladus aduncus forms, such as var. kneiffii, which has long leaf cells and a channeled acumen in some forms and no serrations on the margin.

 

NOTE:.  “The occurrence of C. curvicaule in North America has not been confirmed, and the only North American specimens referred to this species (H. G. Simmons 584 p.p. and 585, in S) belong to C. filicinum” (Hedenäs in FNA, Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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CYNODONTIUM Bruch & Schimper in W. P. Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 12. 1856,

name conserved   (Dicranaceae)

Cnestrum I. Hagen 

 

[Cynodontium alpestre (Wahlenberg) Milde, Bryol. Siles., 51. 1869    unillo

Dicranum alpestre Wahlenberg, Fl. Lapp., 339, fig. 21. 1812

 

Cnestrum alpestre (Wahlenberg) Nyholm (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Cynodontium subalpestre Kindb. in Macoun

Cynodontium tenellum (B.S.G.) Limpr.

Cynodontium torquescens Limpr.

Dicranum gracilescens var. tenellum B.S.G.

Oncophorus tenellus (B.S.G.) Williams

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

British Columbia, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming, Alaska, Northwest Territory; Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, South Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan; Greenland, Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec, New England, New York.

 

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Cynodontium jenneri (Schimper) Stirton, Ann. Scott.  Nat. Hist. 15(58): 106. 1906 (Dicranaceae)

Didymodon jenneri Schimper, Trans.  Bot. Soc. Edinburgh 9: 314, fig. 5. 1886;

 

Cynodontium polycarpum var. laxirete (Schimper) Stirton

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Cynodontium polycarpon (Hedwig) Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 12. 1856 

   [note epithet ending in -on, not -um, as in 1990 checklist]   (Dicranaceae) unillo

Fissidens polycarpos Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 159. 1801

 

Oncophorus polycarpus (Hedw.) Brid. (previous Wyoming checklist).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

[As Cynodontium polycarpum (Ehrh.) Schimper]: Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park. 7000’ (1439 p.p.,  1440 p.p.). Hab.: Felsen.” (Roell 1893).

(As Oncophorus polycarpus (Hedw.) Brid.) Mammoth and Yellowstone Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (R.S.Williams), Porter, 1935. (As Oncophorus polycarpus (Hedw.) Brid.) Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Excluded from the flora of North America by Crum et al. 1973.

 

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Cynodontium schisti (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 21: 230. 1864    (Dicranaceae)

Grimmia schisti F. Weber & D. Mohr, Index Mus. Pl. Crypt., [2]. 1803

 

Cnestrum schisti (Wahlenberg) I. Hagen

Cynodontiella schisti (Web. & Mohr) Bryhn

Grimmia schisti Web. & Mohr

Oncophorus brevipes Lindb.

Oncophorus schisti (Web. & Mohr) Lindb.

Rhabdoweisia schisti (Web. & Mohr) B.S.G.

Weissia schisti (Web. & Mohr) Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, South Dakota, Michigan, Ontario; Quebec.

 

(As Oncophorus schisti) Albany Co., Porter 1937.

 

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Desmatodon cernuus (Hueb.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. = Tortula cernua (Hueb.) Lindb.

 

Desmatodon guepinii Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. = Tortula guepinii Bruch & Schimp.

 

Desmatodon heimii (Hedw.) Mitt. = Hennediella heimii (Hedw.) R. H. Zander

 

Desmatodon latifolius (Hedw.) Brid. = Tortula hoppeana (Schultz) Ochyra

 

Desmatodon leucostoma (R.Br.) Berggr. = Tortula leucostoma (R. Brown) Hooker & Greville

 

Desmatodon obtusifolius (Schwägr.) Schimp. = Tortula obtusifolia (Schwägr.) Mathieu

 

Desmatodon plinthobius Sull. & Lesq. in Sull. = Tortula plinthobia (Sull. & Lesqu.) Broth. in H. G. . Engler and K. Prantl

 

Desmatodon porteri (James) in C. F. Austin = Tortula porteri (James) Broth. in H. G. Engler and K. Prantl

 

Desmatodon systylius Schimp. = Tortula systylia (Schimp.) Lindb.

 

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DICHELYMA Myrin, Kongl. Vetensk. Acad. Handl. 1832: 273, plates 6, 7. 1833  (Fontinalaceae) 

 

Dichelyma falcatum (Hedwig) Myrin, Kongl. Vetensk. Acad. Handl. 1832: 274. 1833  unillo

Fontinalis falcata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 299. 1801

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

PARK CO.: 2900 msm, W. A. Weber B-44282 (RM, COLO).

 

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Dichelyma uncinatum Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 44, plate 8 [upper left]. 1864  (Fontinalaceae) unillo

 

Dichelyma cylindricarpum Austin

Dichelyma falcatum var. uncinatum (Mitten) E. Lawton

Dichelyma uncinatum var. cylindricarpum (Austin) Cardot

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1530) (Roell 1893).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK:  (Lost Lake near Roosevelt Lodge, with Calliergonella conardii Lawt., Aug. 28, 1951, E. Lawton 1495 [in with C. conardii spm.] (WTU).

 

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DICHODONTIUM Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 12. 1856  (Dicranaceae)

 

Dichodontium olympicum Renauld & Cardot, Bot. Gaz. 17: 296. 1892  (Dicranaceae)

 

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5178), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO: La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson, 5178, Aug. 25, 1898, (RM).

 

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Dichodontium pellucidum (Hedwig) Schimper,Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 12. 1856 (Dicranaceae)

Dicranum pellucidum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 142. 1801;

 

Bryum flavescens Dickson ex Withering;

Dichodontium flavescens (Dickson ex Withering) Lindberg;

Dichodontium pellucidum var. americanum Lesquereux & James

Dichodontium pellucidum var. fagimontanum (Bridel) Schimper

Dichodontium. subflavescens Kindberg  

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

ALBANY CO.: Hermann 23423, 9800 ft., c.fr. Sept. 1, l970 (RM); Medicine Bow Mountains, Barber Lake Picnic area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek, 8720-8740 ft., Pinus contorta forest; on rock streamside, N. G. Miller 10,261B (NYS) June 7, 1993 + Brachythecium nelsonii.

 

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DICRANELLA (Müller Hal.) Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 13. 1856, name conserved (Dicranaceae)

 

Dicranella crispa (Hedwig) Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 13. 1856   unillo

Dicranum crispum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 132. 1801

 

Anisothecium crispum (Hedw.) Lindb.

Anisothecium vaginale (Withering) Loeske

Bryum vaginale Dicks.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranella palustris (Dickson) E. F. Warburg, Trans.  Brit. Bryol. Soc. 4(2): 247. 1962  (Dicranaceae)

Bryum palustre Dickson, Fasc. Pl. Crypt. Brit. 4: 11. 1801

 

Dicranella squarrosa (Schrader) Schimper (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming in FNA Vol. 27, 2007.

 

“I collected new in the Rocky Mountains Dicranum palustre La Pyl. var. schlotthaueri Barn. in Yellowstone National Park, Wyom. ...” (Roell 1893).

 

PARK CO. Beartooth Plateau, Shoshone National Forest, Forest Road 130 1A, Gilbert Creek, roadside, Carex spp. - Bryidae fen and moist meadow along creek bank, on damp clayey soil in seepage; T57N R108W S1, 44̊57.380-385’ N, 109̊44.280-285’W, elev. ca 7,700 ft (2350 m), 31 July 2010, Kosovich-Anderson 7591 (RM, US, det. R. Ireland), no. 7593 (RM, det. by the author) (Kosovich-Anderson 2011b).

 

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Dicranella schreberiana (Hedwig) Hilferty ex H. A. Crum & L. E. Anderson, Mosses E. N. Amer. 1: 169.  1981  (Dicranaceae) unillo

Dicranum schreberianum Hedwig,  Sp. Musc. Frond., 144, plate 33, figs. 6–10. 1801

 

Anisothecium grevilleanum (Bridel) Arnell & C. E. O. Jensen

Anisothecium. schreberianum (Hedwig) Dixon

Anisothecium schreberianum var. elatum (Schimper) Wijk & Margadant

Dichodontium canadense (Mitten) Lesquereux & James

Dicranella canadense (Mitten) Austin

Dicranella grevilleana (Bridel) Schimper

Dicranella  schreberi (Swartz ex Anonymous) Schimper

Dicranella schreberi var. elata Schimper

Dicranella schreberi var. grevilleana (Bridel) Mönkemeyer

Dicranella  schreberi var. occidentalis Austin

Dicranella schreberi var. robusta Braithwaite

Dicranella schreberiana var. robusta (Braithwaite) H. A. Crum & L. E. Anderson

Leptotrichum canadense (Mitten) A. Jaeger (FNA Vol. 27, 2017)

 

 (from the previous checklist:)

Cynodontium canadense Mitt.

Dicranella schreberi var. elata Schimp.

Dicranella schreberi var. lenta (Braithw.) Limpr.

Dicranella schreberi var. occidentalis Aust.

Dicranella schreberi var. robusta Schimp. ex Braithw.

Dicranum schreberianum Hedw.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Alberta, Montana; Alaska; South Dakota, Michigan, Ontario; Labrador, Quebec, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey.

 

ALBANY CO.: Steep, peaty bank of Friend Creek in willow thicket, alt. 7800 ft., NW base of Laramie Peak, 19 miles SSW of Esterbrook, September 25, 1974, Hermann 25928 (RM); Moist peaty bank of Crow Creek in clearing, alt. 8000 ft., Medicine Bow National Forest, 26 miles SE of Laramie, c. fr., July 5, 1974, Hermann 25702 (RM). JOHNSON CO:, UTM 13 334577 E 4889076 N, on soil; in edge of stream, with grasses, sedges, Salix sp., surrounded by forest of Pinus contorta & Picea engelmannii; near head of North Fork Powder River; approx. 1.0 air mi. SE of Powder River Pass; Bighorn National Forest: elev. 9164 ft. (2794 m.): coll. Martin J. Lenz #2426 31 Aug. 2005 (RM).

 

The Lenz specimen represents the var. robusta (Schimp. ex Braithw.) Crum & Anders., with blunt leaves, with “margins bluntly and irregularly serrulate to serrate with coarse teeth form by projections of marginal cells” (Crum & Anderson 1981). The cells are larger, the leaf bases are gradually tapered from the shoulders above the clasping base to the apex.  The strong serrations develop from the apex to the base.

 

Separated from D. crispa by the unistratose leaves (bistratose in parts). Dicranella crispa is bistratose in both margins and lamina in the distal part of the leaf. All four Wyoming species have leaves weakly to strongly squarrose on the stem, linear in the spreading upper part (the limb) from an enlarged, more or less erect, clasping or sheathing base. Other species in the genus have erect leaves from a spreading base. Both D. schreberiana and D. palustris have cells on the shoulders that are nearly isodiametric to short-rectangular (2-3:1), especially on the margins, but the leaves on D. palustris are long-decurrent with a blunt apex. They are not excurrent at all in D. schreberiana with an acute apex.

 

All the cells of species of Onchophorus are small and quadrate to short-rectangular, with no elongate, narrow rectangular cells. Dichodontium and Cynodontium have coarse mammillae or papillae on the leaves. Species of Dicranum have colored cells at the leaf base, especially in the alar region.

 

The leaves of Dicranella schreberiana are strongly crisped, wet or dry.

 

All four species in the genus from Wyoming have red (not yellow) setae, especially when old.

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Dicranella subulata  (Hedwig) Schimper, Coroll. Bryol. Eur., 13. 1856    (Dicranaceae)

Dicranum subulatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 128, figs. 1–5. 1801

 

Dicranella curvata (Hedwig) Schimper

Dicranella secunda Lindberg

Dicranella  stikinensis Grout

Dicranella  subulata var. curvata (Hedwig) Rabenhorst (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon, California; Greenland, Labrador, New Brunswick, Quebec, New England, Ireland, 1982. (As Dicranella curvata Schimper) of Porter, 1935, reported for Yellowstone Canyon, Yellowstone National Park.

 

ALBANY CO.: Lewis Lake, 10,800 ft., F. J. Hermann 17715 1/2 (RM). CARBON CO.: North French Creek, Medicine Bow Mts., 9500 ft., F.J. Hermann 17204 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: in slough, left of the first bridge, Uncle Tom's Trail, Dwight C. Smiley 165 (YELLO), Aug. 1, 1932, fruit just immature, calyptrate.

 

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DICRANOWEISIA Lindberg ex Milde, Bryol. Siles., 48. 1869  (Dicranaceae)

 

DICRANOWEISIA

In the second species at least the stereid cells are not evident in the upper part of the leaf but the section must be made lower down.

 

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Dicranoweisia cirrata (Hedwig) Lindberg in C. Milde, Bryol. Siles., 49. 1869   (Dicranaceae)  unillo

Weissia cirrata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 69. 1801

 

Weissia cirrata Hedwig (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, 7000’ (1439 p.p., 1440 p.p.) ... auf Holz, an Baumzweigen und an Felsen” (Roell 1893).  Albany, Bighorn, Sublette, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Holzinger ex., Aven & Elias Nelson, 5892.

 

To differentiate both of these bistratose-margined species, section this species to determine it is recurved, the following species is not.

D. cirrata is only bistratose on the distal margins, otherwise 1-stratose, but D. crispula is bistratose distally.

Also this species does not appear to be papillose in section, due to longitudinal cuticular thickenings on the leaf surface (i.e. striolate like Polytrichadelphus lyalii or species of Amphidium). It is never toothed in the apex like the following species, which is really “stepped” like Ceratodon and even Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum. The alar cells of D. crispula may be larger than adjacent cells, or even be colored (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranoweisia crispula  (Hedwig) Milde, Bryol. Siles.,  49. 1869  (Dicranaceae)

Weissia crispula Hedwig, Sp. Musc.Frond., 68. 1801

 

Dicranoweisia crispula var. compacta (Schwägrichen) Lindberg;

Dicranoweisia contermina Renauld & Cardot;

Dicranoweisia roellii Kindberg;

Trichostomum alpinum Kindberg;

Weissia compacta Schwägrichen (FNA, Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Dicranoweisia contermina Ren. & Card.

Dicranoweisia crispula var. compacta (Schleich. ex Schwaer.) Lindb. in Kindb.

Dicranoweisia crispula var. contermina (Ren. & Card.) Grout

Dicranoweisia crispula var. roellii (Kindb. in Roell.) Lawt

Weissia convoluta C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Yukon, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado: Michigan. Sheep Mountain, Albany Co (Aven Nelson, 3312); Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (Bartram and Williams, Porter, 1935. “Common in front of glaciers”, Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981.

 

(Var. crispula): ALBANY CO.: granite boulder on aspen slope along N. Fork of Little Laramie River, Sand Lake Rd., 8500 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., 3 miles W of Centennial, Herman 17743, Aug. 4, 1962, c. fr. (RM); s.l. Medicine Bow Mtns, Barber Lake Picnic area, 2.5 miles, air, NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek elev. 8720-8740 ft., Pinus contorta forest; growing from crevice of boulder, N.G. Miller 10,255 (NYS) June 7, 1993. (Var. contermina) BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Natl. For., Lake Helen Quandrant, Clout Peak Wilderness Area, 10,200 ft., Aug. 3, 1992, Katherine Zacharkevics (BING). FREMONT CO: Bridger-Teton National Forest on US26 & US287, between Moran & Dubois. ca. 9000' Apline meadow, much herbage. Wet with flowing streams. Granite outcrops. W slopes of knoll, c.fr., Eckel 9308103 (BUF). (Var. crispula) PARK CO.; on rocks 2900 msm, W.A.Weber B-44232 (COLO, RM); 2900 msm, W.A.Weber B-44232 (COLO, RM); (Var. contermina) PARK CO.: granite bluff along Route 212, Shoshone Natl. Forest, 7500 ft., 47 miles NW of Cody, Herman 20050, July 19, 1965 (RM). (Var. contermina) SHERIDAN CO.: limestone boulder in spruce/fir forest, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-F4 (RM) c. fr. June 19, 1992, with Hypnum cupressiforme, Tortella tortuosa, Tortula norvegica. (Var. contermina) SUBLETTE CO.: 7950 ft., F.J. Hermann 25320 (RM); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 South fork Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°34'W. On damp rock at edge of fen, Richard Andrus 7837 (BING). (Var. contermina) TETON CO.: Crystal Creek, on downed, decaying Lodgepole Pine, common, R. Lichvar, 677, July 7, 1977, c.fr.(RM); (Var. crispula) TETON CO.; 2250 m, wet rock, Duell 2257/2 (BUF); perichaetial bracts muticous, blunt, basal cells more or less enlarged, brown-tinged, boulder on open slope along Hidden Falls Trail, NW of Jenny Lake, alt. 7000 ft., Teton Range, National Park, F. J. Hermann 25554, fruit in spears, Aug. 29, 1973 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: on US14,16&20 just before E entrance to Park, border with Shoshone National Forest. 6951' Granitic rocks, Spruce-Pine woods, Juniperus woodland, xeric, S slope. c.fr. July 6, 1985 Eckel 94082302 (BUF, RM); on stump, in Clematis Gulch opposite the reservoir, Dwight C. Smiley 46 (YELLO) July 29, 1932, c.fr. dehisced (det. as Weisia wolfii); on large boulder in shade, Old Faithful, Observation Point Trail, Dwight C. Smiley 93 (YELLO) Aug. 1, 1932, fruit in spears (as Weisia wolfii); on boulder, Old Faithful, Observation Point Trail, Smiley 159 (YELLO) Aug. 1, 1932 (as Weisia convoluta).

 

Note the color: to a blue-green (like Eucladium verticillatum) in good situations, to sordid yellowish green, thin, contorted when dry in more xeric. Erect capsule, lightly and irregularly wrinkled, the striations, the bases of the teeth where the tips are usually eroded away are usually dark red and striate.

 

Only two species of Dicranoweisia are reported for North America: D. cirrata and D. crispula without varieties: basal cell inflations are variable, as are all papillose to papillose-basaly striate peristomes together with their variable perichaetial/perigonial bracts (see Flower's discussion of the differences between these taxa, Bryologist 59: 239-244) Note that the dried capsules, though not longitudinally striate as in Cynodontium, are irregularly so (rugose) with rugae “squirming” on the capsule surface. Note also how like Ceratodon purpureus the leaves are, with their deeper channeling, toothed or stepped apical margins and box- like cells (square). The double layer of cells is distinctive. Note that occasionally the longitudinal striations are quite visible in cells just above the basal cells; they may be high enough to be discerned by the shallow depth of field under high magnification (x570). If the striae are not very high, a cross section is necessary. Note also that the leaves of this species are not recurved but appear to be that way because of the double to triple cell layers at the extreme margins - a section is definitive.

 

In the variety crispula, the inner perichaetial leaves are convolute- sheathing, with no limb, obtuse to acute. In the var. contermina, there is a limb in the inner perichaetial leaves, the perichaetial leaves tend to be acuminate.

 

Note that Europeans and Crum & Anderson do not refer to a var. contermina. The inflated basal cells of the typical variety are not demonstrated in this variety, or only occasionally. Perhaps specimens in the western United States lose the distinction of this characteristic. However, the perichaetial leaves don't correlate: convolute leaves with no limb or awn may be found with leaves with no inflated alar cells. Note Flowers (1973) “Since most of our plants have undifferentiated alar cells associated with acute to broadly obtuse convolute-clasping inner perichaetial leaves, var. contermina loses much of its supposed individuality and rests only on the clasping but scarcely convolute inner perichaetial leaves with rather long acuminate upper portions.”

 

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DICRANUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 126. 1801  (Dicranaceae)

 

Dicranum acutifolium (Lindberg & Arnell) C. E. O. Jensen in H. Weimarck, Förtekn. Skand. Växt., Moss. ed. 2, 18. 1937   unillo

Dicranum bergeri var. acutifolium Lindberg & Arnell, Kongl. Svenska Vetensk. Acad. Handl., n. s. 23(10): 79. 1890

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

“[Leaf] Margins ... are almost completely 2-stratose” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranum bonjeanii De Notaris in D. Lisa, Elenc. Musch., 29. 1837 (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

[With Dicranum palustre La Pyl. as synonym:] Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1443). (Roell 1893). Roell had particular difficulty distinguishing his D. bonjeanii from D. scoparium, “Approximately half of this material (1443)  appears typical enough. The rest is similar to  those from Seattle (166)” (Roell 1893).  Roell described a new variety of D. bonjeanii, var. schlotthaueri from Yellowstone, 7000’ (1441).

Usually synonymized with Dicranum scoparium (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007), but recognized by many as distinct. “...both species are distinctive ecologically: D. bonjeanii prefers eutrophic fens, whereas D. scoparium usually grows in decidedly dry to mesic woodlands, on soil, humus, humus over rock, stumps and logs, tree bases, etc.” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranum elongatum Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc.  Frond. Suppl. 1(1): 171, plate 43. 1811   (Dicranaceae)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) - new to Wyoming.

 

PARK CO., SNF, Beartooth Plateau, 0.8 km E of Christmas Lake, the head of an unnamed tributary to Littlerock Creek, alpine fen, north-central portion of fen, Salix planifolia - Carex scopulorum; - abundant in hummocks, on peaty soil; T58N, R104W, S34, 44*57,930-58,015’N, 109*24,820-850’W, elev. ca. 10,650 ft (3245 m), 21 August 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 3593 (COLO, MO, RM), 3611, 3624, 3640,3664, 3676 (Kosovich-Anderson 2011a).

 

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Dicranum fuscescens Turner, Muscol. Hibern. Spic., 60, plate 5, fig. 1. 1804 var. fuscescens (Dicranaceae)

 

 

Dicranum fuscescens var. congestum (Bridel) Husnot

Dicranum sulcatum Kindberg (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Dicranum camptophyllum Kindb.

Dicranum congestum Brid.

Dicranum crispulum C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Dicranum leucobasis C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Dicranum sulcatum Kindb. in Macoun

Dicranum trachyphyllum Ren. & Card.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Distinct from D. acutifolium by leaf margins that are mostly 1-stratose (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Yukon, California, Colorado; Minnesota, Michigan, Ontario; Greenland and Labrador to Florida.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Clematis Gulch Trail, E. Lawton 1799 (YELLO) Aug. 16, 1953.

 

There is a var. flexicaule (Brid.) Wils. in the 1990 checklist.

 

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Dicranum muehlenbeckii Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 1: 142, plate 78. 1847    (Dicranaceae)

 

Dicranum rauei Aust.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, 7000’(1444, 1445 p.p.), “these specimens are sterile and are perhaps to be compared with Drcranum fuscescens” (Roell 1893).

(Rare) British Columbia, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Northwest Territory, Colorado; North Dakota, Ontario; Quebec, New England.

 

PARK CO.: Beartooth Pass, 3200 msm, W. A. Weber B-44303 (COLO, RM); hummock in white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1742 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990.

 

“... a somewhat rare species throughout North America” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranum ontariense W. L. Peterson, Canad. J. Bot. 55: 988. 1977  (Dicranaceae)

Dicranum drummondii Sullivant ex Lindberg, Bot. Not. 1865: 79. 1865, not Müller Hal. 1848    

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

“This is a North American endemic species that was previously mistaken for D. drummondii Müller Hal., a predominantly Eurasian species which was unknown on this continent until it was discovered just recently on the Aleutian Islands” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranum polysetum Swartz, Monthly Rev., ser. 2, 34: 538. 1801   (Dicranaceae) unillo

Dicranum rugosum (Funck) Bridel 

 

Bryum rugosum Hoffm. ex Funck

Dicranum rugosum (Funck) Hoffm. ex Brid.

Dicranum undulatum Ehrh. ex Web. & Mohr

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska; widespread in the Middle West, Manitoba to Michigan, south to South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois; Newfoundland and Nova Scotia to North Carolina. RARE (As D. rugosum), Weston Co., Wynne, 1943. Ireland, 1982.

 

“It is one of the largest, most conspicuous, and most easily recognized species in the genus in North America” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranum rhabdocarpum Sullivant, Mem. Amer. Acad. Arts, n. s. 4: 172. 1849    (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Dicranum scoparioides Schimp. in Besch.

Orthodicranum rhabdocarpum (Sulliv.) Holzinger

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming; Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona. Lawton. On the Colorado-Wyoming line, Albany County (Porter, 1756). Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: on the dryer shaded ground near the lake shore, Beaver Lake, Aven & Elias Nelson 6125 (RM) July 24, 1899, exsiccat, det. R. H. True. (originally as D. bonjeani). Verified by R. Ireland, CANM, 1991.

 

“... an easily recognized species that occurs in the flora area only in the Rocky Mountains and the mountains of Arizona” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Dicranum scoparium Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 126. 1801  (Dicranaceae)

 

Dicranum pallidum Bruch & Schimp. ex C. Muell.

Dicranum angustifolium Kindb. in Macoun

Dicranum canadense Kindb., in Macoun

Dicranum kindbergii Par.

Dicranum latifolium J. J. Amann (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Dicranum mexicanum Schimp. in Besch.

Dicranum scopariforme Kindb.

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, 7000’ (1442). (Roell 1893).

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Colorado; South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan, Ontario; Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Quebec to Georgia and Alabama. Albany, Teton cos., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. (As Dicranum bonjeani DeNot.) [Albany Co.], Beaver Lake, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 5936), Porter, 1937.

 

SHERIDAN CO.: Mineral soil on limestone, Bighorn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-025, June 16, 1992 (BUF, RM) c. fr., dehisced, teeth uneroded, with Ditrichum flexicaule. TETON CO: on humus in deep shade under shrubs along Jenny Lake Trail, west shore of Jenny Lake, alt. 7000 ft., Hermann 25766, Aug. 5, 1974 (sterile) (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: T.C.Frye. July 7, l934 (RM); open lodgepole pine woods, 8000 ft., 4 miles NW of Fishing Bridge, Hermann, 20020, July 18, 1965 (sterile); Firehole River, near Old Faithful Geyser, on soil, T. C. Frye, July 6, 1934 (RM): the leaves are well toothed, long and slender; along Firehole River, Old Faithful, Conard 48-262 (YELLO) Sept. 4, 1948.

 

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Dicranum spadiceum J. E. Zetterstedt, Kongl. Svenska Vetensk. Acad. Handl. 5(10): 20. 1865  (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Dicranum angustum Lindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Dicranum laevidens R. S. Williams (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Dicranum muehlenbeckii var. neglectum (De Not.) Pfeff.

Dicranum neglectum Jur. ex De. Not.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon; Labrador, Quebec.

 

(As Dicranum neglectum Juratz.) Yancey's, Yellowstone National Park (Aven & Elias Nelson, 5936), Porter, 1935. Wyoming, Flowers 1973. PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, 2900 msm, W. A. Weber B-44241 (COLO, RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: A. & E. Nelson, July 17, 1899 (RM); Lost Lake, Elva Lawton 1833 (YELLO) Aug. 17, 1953 (det. as D. fuscescens).

 

This species, in areolation, resembles a broader Dicranum elongatum.

 

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Dicranum tauricum  Sapjegin, Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 46: 10. 1911    (Dicranaceae) unillo

 

Dicranum strictum Schleich. ex Mohr

Dicranum strictum D. Mohr (FNA, Vol. 27, 2007).

Orthodicranum strictum (Mohr) Broth.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, California, Colorado, Saskatchewan. Wyoming, Flowers 1973. (As Dicranum strictum Schleich.) Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (collector unknown), Porter, 1935. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

CROOK CO.: Black Hills: Bear Lodge Mts. Along Beaver Creek, 6.4 km N/NE of Warrens Peak. Conifer woods; moss partly shaded, on decaying Pinus ponderosa log, Churchill (8748 BUF) Exsiccat 13 Musci Planitiebus Incolae 1987. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Tower Junction, F. J. Hermann 25768 (RM).

 

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DIDYMODON Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 104. 1801

Barbula sect. Acutae Steere; Barbula subsect. Acutiformes Kindberg; Barbula sect. Asteriscium

Müller Hal.; Barbula sect. Fallaces (De Notaris) Steere; Barbula subsect. Fallaciformes Kindberg; Barbula sect. Graciles Milde; Barbula sect. Rubiginosae Steere; Barbula sect. Vineales Steere; Barbula subsect. Vinealiformes Kindberg; Dactylhymenium Cardot; Didymodon sect. Asteriscium (Müller Hal.) R. H. Zander; Didymodon sect. Fallaces (De Notaris) R. H. Zander; Didymodon sect. Graciles (Milde) K. Saito; Didymodon sect. Vineales (Steere) R. H. Zander; Geheebia Schimper; Husnotiella Cardot; Trichostomopsis Cardot  (Pottiaceae)

 

Didymodon asperifolius (Mitten) H. A. Crum, Steere & L. E. Anderson, Bryologist 67: 163. 1964  unillo

Barbula asperifolia Mitten, J. Proc. Linn. Soc., Bot., suppl. 1: 34. 1859

 

Didymodon rufus Lorentz (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

PARK CO: 3250 msm, Weber B-44226 (RM, COLO).

 

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Didymodon fallax (Hedwig) R. H. Zander, Phytologia 41: 28. 1978   (Pottiaceae) unillo

Barbula fallax Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 120. 1801 

 

Barbula ferruginea Schimp. ex Besch.

Triquetrella ferruginea (Schimp. ex Besch.) Thér.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

SHERIDAN CO.: Mineral soil on limestone outcrop, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 28, McKee 92-030, June 17, 1992 (RM), with Distichium capillaceum and Mnium blyttii.

 

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Didymodon ferrugineus (Schimper ex Bescherelle) M. O. Hill, J. Bryol. 11: 599. 1982 (Pottiaceae) unillo

Barbula ferruginea Schimper ex Bescherelle, Mém. Soc. Natl. Sci. Nat. Cherbourg 16: 181. 1872

 

Barbula reflexa(Brid.) Brid.

Didymodon fallax var. reflexus (Brid.) R. H. Zander

Didymodon rigidicaulis (Müller Hal.) K. Saito

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

 (As D. fallax var. reflexus (Brid.) Zander) Crum & Anderson, 1981 mention a report from Wyoming (p. 342 of Vol.1).

 

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[Didymodon luridus Sprengel (see Zander 1978e) “does not occur in the flora area, though reported from there by many authors (often as D. trifarius, see Zander 1981” (Zander, FNA 2007).

 

(As Didymodon trifarius) Weston Co., Wynne, 1943. ]

 

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Didymodon nicholsonii Culmann, Rev. Bryol. 34: 100, figs. 1–9. 1907 (as nicholsoni) (Pottiaceae) unillo

Didymodon vinealis var. nicholsonii  (Culmann) R. H. Zander

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

PARK CO.: 6500 ft., Hermann 20033 (RM).

 

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Didymodon rigidulus Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 104. 1801 (as rigidulum) (Pottiaceae) unillo

Barbula rigidula (Hedwig) Milde

 

var. rigidulus

 

Barbula waghornei Kindb.

Didymodon fuscoviridis Card.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Barbula rigidulus (Hedw.) Mitt.) Limestone rocks, Telephone Canyon, Albany Co. (Porter, 1278), Porter, 1937. SHERIDAN CO.: hanging underneath a ledge with dripping water from limestone seep, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-010 (BUF), June 16, 1992, with propagula, with D. rigidulus var. icmadophilus intermixed.

 

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var. gracilis (Schleicher ex Hooker & Greville) R. H. Zander, Cryptog. Bryol. Lichénol. 2: 393. 1981

Tortula gracilis Schleicher ex Hooker & Greville, Edinburgh J. Sci. 1: 300. 1824

 

Barbula acuta (Brid.) Brid.

Didymodon acutus (Brid.) K. Saito (all FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

ALBANY CO.: 7415 ft., limestone rock, full sunlight, Vukelich, Mar. 19, 1988 (BUF); forming dense cushions on limestone rocks, Telephone Canyon, Nov. 25, 1932 C. L. Porter 1278 (NY). CROOKE CO.: PM Eckel 219686 (RM, BUF). FREMONT CO.: Big spring about 4 miles east of Dubois, Frye, June 23, 1931 (WTU). SHERIDAN CO.: In crevices of rock ridge faces, limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W Section 15, McKee 92- 048, June 24, 1992 (RM), with Encalypta vulgaris vulgaris, Tortula mucronifolia.

 

See also discussion sub var. icmadophilus.

 

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var. icmadolphilus (Schimper ex Müller Hal.) R. H. Zander, Cryptog. Bryol. Lichénol. 2: 394. 1981

Barbula icmadophila Schimper ex Müller Hal., Syn. Musc. Frond. 1: 614. 1849

 

Barbula acuta var.icmadophila (Schimper ex Müller Hal.) H. A. Crum;

Didymodon acutus var. icmadophilus (Schimper ex Müller Hal.) R. H. Zander

Didymodon icmadophilus (Schimper ex Müller Hal.) K. Saito (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Barbula acuta ssp. icmadophila (Schimp. ex C. M.) Podp.

Barbula gracilis ssp. icmadophila (Schimp. ex C. M.) Amann

Barbula icmadophila Schimp. ex C. M.

Didymodon icmadophilus (Schimp. ex C.M.) Saito (spelled “icmadophyllus”).

Tortula icmadophila (Schimp. ex C. M.) Lindb.

 

This variety was not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

SHERIDAN CO.: hanging underneath a ledge with dripping water from limestone seep, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-010 (BUF), June 16, 1992, with D. rigidulus var. rigidulus (propaguliferous) intermixed. Specimen with the characteristic attenuated fleshy apices and reduced upper lamina. The varieties intergrade. Note that var. icmadophilus is generally longer in both leaf and acumen than gracilis (see Zander, Cryptogamie). A specimen from the Loess Hills of Iowa is also papillose. Barbula bescherellei Sauerb. in Jaeg. was made D. rigidulus sensu lato by Zander (1981 [1982]), and it resembles icmadophilus rather than gracilis (Barbula acuta).

 

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Didymodon tophaceus (Bridel) Lisa, Elenc. Musch., 31. 1837  (Pottiaceae) unillo

Trichostomum tophaceum Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 4: 84. 1818

 

Barbula pringlei (Card.) Hilp.

Barbula tophacea (Brid.) Mitt.

Dactylhymenium pringlei Card.

Desmatodon hendersonii (Ren. & Card.) R S. Williams

Husnotiella pringlei (Card.) Grout (all FNA 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Didymodon trifarius (of authors) = Didymodon vinealis var. luridus (Hornsch. in Spreng.) Zand.  See Zander, R.H. l981 [l982] Cryoptogamie Bryol. Lichénol., 2: 379-422. Didymodon trifarius was excluded from the North American flora by Crum, et al., l973.

 

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Didymodon umbrosus (Müller Hal.) R. H. Zander, Phytologia 41: 22. 1978  (Pottiaceae) unillo

Barbula umbrosa Müller Hal., Linnaea 42: 340. 1879;

 

Didymodon australasiae var. umbrosus (Muller Hal.) R. H. Zander

Trichostomopsis crispifolia (Card.

Trichostomopsis umbrosa (Müller Hal.) H. Robinson (all FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

.

This species was not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), although the fact that a duplicate of the following specimen existed at BUF indicated the author of the genus had verified it, even though the record did not end up in the FNA.

 

SUBLETTE CO.: south fork of Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft., on damp rock at edge of fen, 42°59'N, 109°34'W, R. Andrus 7833a (BING, BUF) c.fr. Aug. 16, 1989, with Grimmia tenerrima.

 

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Didymodon vinealis (Bridel) R. H. Zander, Phytologia 41: 25. 1978 (Pottiaceae) unillo

Barbula vinealis Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 830. 1827

 

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var. vinealis

 

Barbula bakeri Cardot & Thériot

Barbula circinnulata Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Barbula cylindrica (Taylor) Schimper

Barbula. flexifolia Hampe

Barbula horridifolia Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Barbula laterita Kindberg;

Barbula pseudorigidula Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Barbula robustifolia Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Barbula semitorta Sullivant

Barbula subcylindrica Brotherus

Barbula subgracilis Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Barbula tortellifolia Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Barbula treleasei Cardot & Thériot

Barbula vinealis var. flaccida Bruch & Schimper

Barbula  virescens Lesq.

Didymodon vinealis var. flaccidus (Bruch & Schimper) R. H. Zander (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

SHERIDAN CO. 6600-8000 ft., Odasz (1145 BH) (RM, BUF). WASHAKIE CO., Tensleep Canyon, willow roots, streamside, R, Zander, July 24, l980 (BUF). WESTON CO.: dryish hill, on ground, with Desmatodon obtusifolius, Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum, July 16, 1942, Otto Degener & Leroy Peiler (NY); (As var. flaccidus) SHERIDAN CO.: on vertical rock face, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-024 (BUF), with Homalothecium, Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum, Fissidens bryoides, Platydictya jungermannoiodes, Distichium capillaceum.

YELLOWSTONE NATL. PARK, shore of Yellowstone Lake near W. Thumb, limestone, Zander July 23, l980 (BUF).

 

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var. rubiginosus (Mitten)  R. H. Zander, Cryptog. Bryol. Lichénol. 2: 417. 1981

Barbula rubiginosa Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 27, fig. 5. 1865

 

Barbula melanocarpa Kindberg;

Barbula subicmadophila Kindberg;

Didymodon occidentalis R. H. Zander

Racomitrium cyclodictyon Cardot & Thériot  (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007), but no doubt overlooked at BUF.

 

TETON CO.: at Hwy. 22, Burbank Creek 6 miles SE of Victor, Pinus-Pseudotsuga-forests, primitive rocks about 2260 msm on rock at creek border, Duell 2238./2 (BUF), leg. 7.8.1981.

 

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DISTICHIUM Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 153. 1846  (Ditrichaceae)

 

Distichum capillaceum (Hedwig) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 156. 1846 unillo

Cynontodium capillaceum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 57. 1801

 

Swartzia montana Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona; Manitoba, Minnesota, Michigan; Greenland and Nova Scotia to New England and New York. (As Swartzia montana) Rather common throughout the State, especially in limestone regions. Albany, Carbon, Johnson, Sheridan, Sublette, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO: Medicine Bow Mountains, W of Centennial, Pole Mountain Division (Sheridan Mountains). WY 130, near the Snowy Range Pass. Granite rocks, partial shade, Aug. 5, 1984, with R. Zander, Eckel 871107 (BUF). BIG HORN CO: T49N R 87W S25 Big Horn Mountains; ca. 1 air mile SW of Tyrrell Ranger Station; Sec 25 & 36. East facing slope. El. 8800 ft. Rocky Mtn. Herb. with Gymnostomum aeruginosum, June 21, l979, R. L. Hartman & A. Odasz 9146 (RM). JOHNSON CO., 6600ft. B.E. Nelson 6836c (RM). PARK CO.: wet soil in white spruce fen at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1935 (BUF) April 19, 1992. SHERIDAN CO: Big Horn Mtns., Ice Creek, ca. 8.5 air mi. WNW of Burgess Junction. Openings in valley and on slopes, and on slopes. Elev. 8800 ft. June 23, 1979, Hartman & Odasz 9248, (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: 10,348 ft., Holmes Rolston III 85115 (CSU). TETON CO: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris, c.fr. July 6, 1985 w. Aulacomnium palustre Eckel 94082101 (BUF, RM). WASHAKIE CO.: 8000 ft., Nelson & Fonken 7316 (RM, BUF). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, grassy seep, swale, roots of Salix, 6,239 ft, a few miles from Mammoth Hot Springs on Road to Tower. P. M. Eckel 95082828 (BUF) July 6, 1995, & Aulacomnium palustre, Amblystegium juratz., Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. bimum, Brachythecium. frigidum, Drepanocladus aduncus & D. uncinatus, Leptobryum pyriforme, Plagiomnium rugicum, Plagiothecium denticulatum

 

NOTE: Without fruit, this may be confused with Leptobryum pyriforme (see discussion): both have long, setaceous leaves. There is a var. curvatum Flow. in 1990 checklist [= same capsule but curved - banana shaped.]

 

 

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Distichum inclinatum (Hedwig) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 2: 157. 1846  (Ditrichaceae)

Cynontodium inclinatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 58. 1801

 

Swartzia inclinata Hedw.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park,  (1447) (Roell 1893).

British Columbia, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming; Yukon, Northwest Territory, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado; Minnesota, Ontario; Greenland, Quebec, and New England. [As Swartzia inclinata Hedw.] Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 6026), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn, along WY11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial; seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix dominant, Buck 23246, c. fr. June 7, 1993 [NY]. FREMONT CO.: Hermann 25309 (RM).

 

Buck's specimen conforms well to Flower's description. As compared to its congener, the stems are indeed darker, as are the capsules, as though the plant was smudged; the capsules are inclined from the juncture with the seta and asymmetrical. The setae are red-purple at the base and red to red-orange above. The peristome segments are strikingly broad [borrow Buck's specimens to illustrate].

 

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DITRICHUM Hampe, Flora 50: 181. 1867, name conserved  . (Ditrichaceae)

 

Ditrichum flexicaule (Schwägrichen) Hampe, Flora 50: 182. 1867  unillo

Cynodontium flexicaule Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(1): 113, plate 29. 1811

 

Leptotrichum flexicaule Hampe

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Leptotrichum flexicaule) In the spray of the falls, Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 3549), Porter, 1935.

 

SHERIDAN CO.: Mineral soil on limestone, Bighorn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-025, June 16, 1992 (BUF, RM) with Dicranum scoparium. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: A. & E. Nelson 5912 (RM).

 

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Ditrichum gracile (Mitten) Kuntze, Revis. Gen. Pl. 2: 835. 1891  (Ditrichaceae) unillo

Leptotrichum gracile Mitten, Hooker’s J. Bot. Kew Gard. Misc. 3: 353. 1851

 

Ditrichum crispatissimum (Müller Hal.) Paris

Ditrichum giganteum R. S. Williams

Leptotrichum crispatissimum Müller Hal.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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DREPANOCLADUS (Müller Hal.) G. Roth, Hedwigia 38(Beibl.): 6. 1899, name conserved (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum subsect. Drepanocladus Müller Hal., Syn. Musc. Frond. 2: 321. 1851; Calliergidium (Renauld) Grout

 

Drepanocladus aduncus (Hedwig) Warnstorf, Beih. Bot. Centralbl. 13: 400. 1903

Hypnum aduncum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 295. 1801

 

Brachythecium edentatum R. S. Williams

Calliergidium bakeri (Renauld) Grout

Drepanocladus aduncus var. kneiffii (Schimper) Mönkemeyer

Drepanocladus aduncus var. polycarpus (Voit) G. Roth

Drepanocladus aduncus var. pseudofluitans (Sanio) Głowacki

Drepanocladus kneiffii (Schimper) Warnstorf

Drepanocladus simplicissimus Warnstorf

Drepanocladus stagnatus Żarnowiec (all from FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(From previous Wyoming checklist:)

Drepanocladus aduncus var. pseudofluitans (Sanio) Glow.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Hypnum aduncum  Hedw.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1567, 1579) (Roell 1893); as H. aduncum var. gracilescens Sch. Yellowstone National Park, Deer Lodge (1418) (Roell 1893); as var. kneiffii Sch. Yellowstone National Park (1561a, 1577a) (Roell 1893); as var. pseudostramineum (K. Müll.)  (= Hypnum pseudostramineum K.M), Yellowstone National Park (1547) (Roell 1893); var. pungens (H. Müll. [sic]) Yellowstone Park (1576) (Roell 1893); var. laxum Sch. Yellowstone National Park (1577a, 1578a) (Roell 1893) [p. 274].

..

Albany County, Carbon County, Lincoln County, Sheridan County, Sublette County, Teton County, Uinta County, and Yellowstone National Park. “The following varieties and forms have been recorded: var. aquaticus forma capillifolius; var. polycarpus formae gracilescens and filicuspis; and var. Kneiffii, Porter, 1935. Sublette Co.: “Species occupying peatland expanses and spring fens ... tolerant of long periods of saturation and submersion,” Cooper & Andrus, 1994. Albany, Lincoln, Sublette, Teton, Unita Cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Lawton. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.; 10,000 ft, leaf mold, F.J. Hermann 17693 1/2 (RM); NW base of Sheep Mtn., seep area (calcarous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23244 (NY). BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Natl. For., Lake Solitude Quad., Cloud Peak Wilderness area, 9,840 ft., filled in lake, Aug. 5, 1992, Katherine Zacharkevics (BING) + Aulacomnium palustre, Warnstorfia exannulata. FREMONT CO.: 8400 ft., F.J. Hermann 25525 (RM). JOHNSON CO.: Big Horn National Forest, Cloud Peak Quadrant. Cloud Peak Wilderness Area. 10,800 ft. T51N R85W, Sec. 18. July 23, 1992. Katherine Zacharkevics (BING). LARAMIE CO.: F.J. Hermann 25920 (RM). LINCOLN CO., moist open willow flat along Fire Trail Creek at Greys River, alt. 6400 ft., Salt River Range, 8 miles E of Alpine Junction, F.J. Hermann 25587 (RM). PARK CO.: 7500 ft. F.J. Hermann 20048 (RM); wet marly substrate, in calcareous fen at base of Cathedral Cliffs, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1928 (BUF) April 19, 1992. SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake Richard Andrus 7799 (BING). TETON CO.: on US26 & US237, 1.3 miles W of Togwotee Pass, Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest, ca. 9000', Picea-Pinus flexilis wood-land, xeric but for stream bottoms. Lupinulus, Asters, wooded stream, soggy debris, with Campylium chrysophyllum, Distichium capillaceum, Aulacomnium palustre, Brachythecium salebrosum, Cratoneuron filicinum, July 6, 1985 Eckel 94082108 (BUF). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: grassy seep, swale, roots of Salix, 6,239 ft, a few miles from Mammoth Hot Springs on Road to Tower. P. M. Eckel 95082829 (BUF), July 6, 1995, with Aulacomnium palustre, Amblystegium juratz., Brachythecium frigidum, Bryum pseudotriquetrum var. bimum, Distichium capillaceum, Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum & Saonia uncinatus, Leptobryum pyriforme, Plagiomnium rugicum, Plagiothecium denticulatum

 

The alar cells of this species are described as hyaline and thin. D. exannulatus with walls yellow or brown, thin or slightly thickened. I find D. aduncus soft with leaves easily coming off, whereas D. exannulatus is coarse with alar regions often staying on the stem.

 

(As var. kneiffii (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Moenk.)

 

Little Laramie River, A. Nelson 4294 (RM). ALBANY CO.: northwest base of Sheep Mtn. along WY Rte. 11; ca. 4 miles due ESE of Centennial, ca. 7,750 ft., fen with low forest of Populus, Betula, Salix in shallow water, a “hanging bog” on steep hillside. wet rotting log, W. D. Reese 18176 (LAF, BUF, RM) June 7, 1993. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn National Forest, Lake Solitude Quadrant. T50N R87W, Sec. 12, 9,600 ft. August 5, 1992. Marshy area just W of Lily Lake, with Philonotis fontana var. pumila. Katherine Zacharkevics (BING). LINCOLN CO.: Cokeville, Aven Nelson 4626 (RM), June 11, 1898. UINTA CO.: Fort Bridger, Elias Nelson 4609 (RM), June 9, 1898.

 

The leaves lie flat and the inflations seem gradual, not abrupt, as in var. polycarpus. The leaves are straight, falcate-secund in var. polycarpus. Care must be had here not to confuse this species with Cratoneuron filicinum, which has a stouter, longer costa and whose cells are short and thick as in Amblystegium with serrated leaf margins. Also one might want to suppose this plant a Brachythecium, such as B. nelsonii (concave leaf bases) or B. starkei (serrated margins): var. kneiffii is flat, entirely smooth leaf margins and with short cells.

 

“The studied two isosyntypes of Hypnum kneiffii var. filiforme S. Berggren consist of the species Drepanocladus aduncus, and D. sordidus and Scorpidium cossonii “ (Hedenäs in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As var. polycarpus (Bland. ex Voit) Roth):

 

ALBANY CO.: ca. 4 air miles east-SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY11, 7700-7900 ft., Populus, Betula, and Salix associated with spring seep; open fen, N. G. Miller 10,271 (NYS) June 7, 1993. PARK CO.: 3200 msm, W.A.Weber B-44314 (RM, COLO). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: along Firehole River near Old Faithful; border of mudpot, T. C. Frye, July 6, 1934 (RM); in Gibbon Canyon, Aven Nelson 6747a (RM); Yancey's, in a bog, Aven & Elias Nelson 5903, July 16, 1899 (RM), note by Porter that Grout det.d as this variety.

 

“Because Drepanocladus aduncus is variable in habit, several taxa have been segregated from this species.  The phenotypes most frequently recognized at the species level were small plants with short laminal cells and weak costae called D. polycarpus(Hedenäs in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Note confusion with Cratoneuron, which is rarely if ever without teeth on the margin.

 

Drepanocladus capillifolius (Warnst.) Warnst. = Drepanocladus longifolius (Wilson ex Mitten) Brotherus ex Paris

 

Drepanocladus crassicostatus Janssens = Drepanocladus longifolius   (Wilson ex Mitten) Brotherus ex Paris

 

Drepanocladus exannulatus (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Warnst.  = Sarmentypnum exannulatum (Schimper) Hedenäs

 

Drepanocladus fluitans (Hedw.) Warnst. = Warnstorfia fluitans (Hedw.) Loeske

 

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Drepanocladus longifolius (Wilson ex Mitten) Brotherus ex Paris, Coll. Nom. Broth., 10. 1909 (Amblystegiaceae) unillo

Amblystegium longifolium Wilson ex Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 12: 571. 1869

 

Drepanocladus aduncus var. capillifolius (Warnstorf) Riehmer

Drepanocladus capillifolius (Warnstorf) Warnstorf

Drepanocladus crassicostatus Janssens (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNAVol. 28, 2014).

 

 (As Drepanocladus capillifolius) Two stations in southern Wyoming are reported by Janssens (1983).

 

(As Drepanocladus capillifolius) CARBON CO.: Wagon Hound Creek, Aven Nelson 4262 (RM) Aug. 21, 1897, with thick walled auricular cells, a robust plant all over, and capillifoliaceous leaves. SHERIDAN CO.: Dome Lake, Ave Nelson 2408 (RM) July 16, 1896.

 

(As Drepanocladus crassicostatus) Yellowstone National Park, Lost Lake, Welch 16387 (CANM)” Janssens (1983). Lost Lake and tributaries, in puddle, shore of Lost Lake, Winona H. Welch 16387 (CANM) Aug. 17, 1953. The tips of the Welch specimen were brush like, collected into a tuft, but the tuft was curled, as were the leaves, not erect. The costa was very wide in leaves of the main stem “often occupying 1/3 to 1/2 of the leaf base. The alar cells are not as well differentiated as in other species of the genus (from Janssens, 1983).

 

Drepanocladus revolvens (Sw.) Warnst. = Scorpidium revolvens (Swartz) Rubers

 

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Drepanocladus polygamus (Schimper) Hedenäs, Bryologist 100: 82. 1997 (Amblystegiaceae)

Amblystegium polygamum Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 60, plate 572. 1853

 

Campyliadelphus polygamus (Schimper) Kanda

Campylium polygamum (Schimper) C. E. O. Jensen

Campylium polygamum var. fluitans Grout

Campylium polygamum var. minus (Schimper) G. Roth

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Hypnum polygamum  var. fallaciosum (Jur.) Ren. & Cardot (Hypnum fallax Jur.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1566) (Roell 1893).

(As Amblystegium polygamum B.S.G.) Lawton where Wyoming is cited.

 

ALBANY CO.: 10,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 17691 (RM).

 

[Drepanocladus sendtneri (Schimp.) Warnst.  (Amblystegiaceae) excluded

 

Drepanocladus sendtneri var. wilsonii (Lindb.) Warnst.

 

This species has apparently been excluded from North America (early version of FNA Vol. 28, 2014); see Crum and Anderson citation below.

 

 “Because the species of the Drepanocladus sendtneri (Schimper ex H. Müller) Warnst. and D. aduncus complexes have only recently been understood, the North American distribution of D. sordidus is at present likely to be incompletely known. The Eurasian and African D. sendtneri is a species of strongly calcareous areas, where it usually grows in shallow fens or in periodically wet depressions. It is most safely distinguished from D. sordidus by a different ratio of median leaf lamina cell length (um) to leaf length (mm), between 17.9-24.4 (between 23.3 - 36.5 in D. sordidus). Although no examined specimens originally identified as D. sendtneri from North America have turned out to belong to this species, it may still be premature to completely exclude the possibility that this otherwise widespread species occurs also on this continent” (Hedenäs, an earlier version of FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Evanston, Uinta County (Aven Nelson, 8125), Porter, 1935. Unita Co., Porter, 1937.

 

UINTA CO.: Evanston, submerged in a pool; Plants of Wyoming exsiccat (RM) Aven Nelson 8125 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 18/viii/1989 Carex fen S. of Timico Lake, Andrus 7894 (BING) [median cells porose]. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Fountain Geyser, Elva Lawton 1511 (YELLO) Aug. 29, 1951 (by reason of the alar cells thick walled, costa stout); Lost Lake outlet H. S. Conard 48-227 (YELLO) Sept. 1, 1948 “gracilescens above, aristinervis below” (det. by reason of colored alar cells and stout costa, but all cell walls thin = intermediate?).

 

Mentioned by Lawton, 1971. Crum & Anderson lump this with D. aduncus (Hedw.) Warnst., for discussion see p. 963.

 

Drepanocladus uncinatus (Hedw.) Warnst. = Saionia uncinata (Hedw.) Loeske

 

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ELODIUM (Sullivant) Austin, Musci Appalach., 52. 1870   (Helodiaceae)

Hypnum sect. Elodium Sullivant in A. Gray, Manual ed. 2, 668. 1856; Helodium Warnstorf, name conserved

 

Elodium blandowii (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Eckel, Phytoneuron 2012–70: 6. 2012 (Helodiaceae)

Hypnum blandowii F. Weber & D. Mohr, Bot. Taschenbuch, 332. 1807 (as blandovii)

 

Helodium blandowii (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Warnstorf

Leskea blandowii (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Mitten

Thuidium blandowii (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Schimper

Hypnum lanatum Bridel (in Lawton)

Helodium lanatum (Bridel) Brotherus (in Grout)

 

In Park Co. Elodium blandowii, forms a rich bryophyte community combined with Aulacomnium palustre, Climacium dendroides, Hylocomium splendens, Helodium blandowii, Rhizomnium spp.,  Marchantia alpestris, [Thuidium recognitum, q.v.] and others “ (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

(As Helodium lanatum (Brid.) Broth.) Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 1746 & 2700; Porter, 935 & 1441), Porter, 1935. (As Thuidium blandowii) Yellowstone National Park: a specimen was noted by Roell (1893) for Yellowstone (number 1531); 

 

ALBANY CO.: Centennial Valley, A. Nelson, Aug. 19, 1895 (RM); Centennial Hills, A. Nelson 2700 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: H.S.Conard Sept. 1, 1948 (48-232), BUF.

 

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ENCALYPTACEAE: “This family is particularly well represented in Wyoming, the plants fruiting abundantly,” Porter, 1935.

 

ENCALYPTA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 60. 1801  (Encalyptaceae)

 

[Encalypta alpina Smith in J. E. Smith et al., Engl. Bot. 20: 1419. 1805 ]

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

ALBANY CO., Porter, 1937.

 

Horton (l983), in a distribution map for this species gives no reference to occurrences in Wyoming. Species seems therefore to be disjunct from Alberta to Colorado.

 

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Encalypta ciliata Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 61. 1801   unillo

 

Encalypta alaskana Kindb. in Macoun

Encalypta ciliata var. microstoma Schimp. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Encalypta laciniata Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, California, Arizona, Colorado; South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ontario; Nova Scotia.  Crook Co., Porter, 1937.

 

Several localities in central Wyoming are indicated on a dot map by Horton, l983 (montane).

 

[Encalypta contorta Hoppe ex Lindb. = E. streptocarpa Hedw. excluded from North America by Anderson, et al. 1990.

 

Albany County (Porter, 675), Porter, 1935.]

 

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Encalypta procera Bruch, Abh. Math.-Phys. Cl. Königl. Bayer. Akad. Wiss. 1: 283. 1832 (Encalyptaceae) unillo

 

Encalypta streptocarpa sensu American authors (sec. Crum & Anderson p. 265)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Horton (l983) on a dot-distribution map gives a literature report for Wyoming, but two dots on state boundaries so that the state in which the reported occurrence lies is ambiguous. (As Encalypta streptocarpa Hedw.) Albany Co., Porter, 1937.

 

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Encalypta rhabdocarpa Schwägrichen, Sp. Musc. Frond. Suppl. 1(1): 56. 1811  (Encalyptaceae)

 

Encalypta intermedia Juratzka

Encalypta rhabdocarpa Schwägrichen;

Encalypta rhaptocarpa var. microstoma Limpricht

Encalypta rhaptocarpa var. subspathulata (Müller Hal. & Kindberg) Flowers

Encalypta vulgaris var. rhaptocarpa (Schwägrichen) E. Lawton (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Encalypta rhabdocarpa var. subspathulata (C. Muell. & Kindb.) Flow. in Grout

Encalypta subspathulata C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Yukon, California, Nevada, Colorado; South Dakota. (As Encalypta rhabdocarpa Schwaeg.) Albany County (Porter, 694), Carbon (Goodding, 75), [Sheridan cos.], Porter, 1935. (As E. rhabdocarpa) Uinta Co., “has been collected by Aven Nelson in Albany and Carbon Counties,” Wynne, 1943.

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mtns, Roger Canyon ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie on Co. Rd. 17, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, 2400 msm, c. f. in calyptrae June 7, 1993 [perhaps Reese at LAF, or Buck at NY]; Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 7 air miles NE of Laramie city center, limestone outcrops with Cerocarpus montanus, Artemisia cava, A. tipartita, A. nova, A. tridentata; on soil below rock outcrop, N. G. Miller 10,233 (NYS), June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: Bridger-Teton Natl. Forest on US26&US287, between Moran & Dubois, ca. 9000', alpine meadow, much herbage, wet with flowing streams, granite outcrops, N slopes of low knoll, c.fr., with Tortula ruralis, Eckel 93081101 (BUF). PARK CO.: soil in crevice of granite outcrop along Crandall Creek, Shoshone Natl. Forest, 36 miles NW of Cody, 6500 ft. F.J. Hermann 20039 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: 7950 ft., F.J. Hermann 25340 (RM).

 

June is a good time to be collecting this species and the following.

 

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Encalypta spathulata Müller Hal., Syn. Musc. Frond. 1: 519. 1849. (Encalyptaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Encalypta spathulata is very similar to E. rhaptocarpa but differs in the fringed calyptra base and weakly striate, eperistomate capsule. The gymnostomous capsules and long awn will separate E. spathulata from other species of the genus” (Magill, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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Encalypta vulgaris Hedwig., Sp. Musc. Frond., 60. 1801  (Encalyptaceae) unillo

 

Encalypta vulgaris var. apiculata Wahlenb.

Encalypta vulgaris var. mutica Brid.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Encalpyta extintoria (L.) Sw. [= Encalypta vulgaris Hedw. cf. Hedw., Spec. Musc. 60. 1801. Index Muscorum.]) “ The plants so far found all belong in var. mutica Brid. Plumbago Canyon, Telephone Canyon, both in Albany County, Porter, 1935.] In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; California, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado; Saskatchewan, Manitoba. (As Encalypta vulgaris Hedw.) Albany Co., Porter, 1937. (As E. vulgaris var. mutica Brid.) Sweetwater Co., “the only other collection of E. vulgaris the author has seen from Wy. was collected in the Laramie Mts., (C.L.Porter 796),” Wynne 1943. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: Roger Canyon, 8ooo ft., F.J. Hermann 17151 (RM); Laramie Mtns., Roger Canyon, Ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, on Co. Rd. 17, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck 23163 (NY). (As Encalypta vulgaris var. mutica Brid.) . BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns. T49N R 87W S25; ca. 1 air mile SW of Tyrrell Ranger Station; Sec 25 & 36; east-facing slope; 8800 ft. June 21, 1979, R. L. Hartman no. 9150, calyptrate, capsules very young. CROOKE CO: on WY 585, 0.8 miles N of Weston Co. line. Grassland with some Artemisia scrub. With Pterygoneurum ovatum, Tortula ruralis, Didymodon rigidulus var. gracilis, July 12, l985, Eckel 419686 (BUF,RM). FREMONT CO. 7800 ft., F.J. Hermann 25534 (RM). PARK CO. 7500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20052 (RM). SHERIDAN CO.: vertical rock face, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-016, c. fr. calyptrate, capsules nearing maturity, June 16, 1992 (BUF, RM). UINTA CO.: Evanston, on dry ground [in a packet of fruiting Bryum caespiticium and filed under that name], c.fr., July 8, 1942, Degener 17,074 (US).

 

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Eurhynchium oreganum (Sullivant) Jaeg. = Kindbergia oregana (Sullivant) Ochyra

 

Eurhynchium pulchellum (Hedw.) Jenn. = Eurhynchiastrum pulchellum (Hedwig) Ignatov & Huttunen

 

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EURHYNCHIASTRUM Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 260. 2003  (Brachytheciaceae)

 

Eurhynchiastrum pulchellum (Hedwig) Ignatov & Huttunen, Arctoa 11: 262. 2003 (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum pulchellum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 265, plate 68 [top], figs. 1–4. 1801

 

 (Synonymy of Eurhynchium pulchellum (Hedw.) Jenn. in earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Eurhynchium diversifolium B.S.G.

Eurhynchium fallax (Ren. & Card.) Grout

Eurhynchium strigosum (Web. & Mohr) B. S. G.

Eurhynchium strigosum var. fallax Ren. & Card.

Eurhynchium strigosum var. robustum Roell

Eurhynchium substrigosum Kindb. in Macoun

Hypnum strigosum Web. & Mohr

 

var. pulchellum or s.l.

 

(As Eurhynchium strigosum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1548, 1549) (Roell 1894).

(As Eurhynchium diversifolium (Schleich.) B. & S.) Pole Mt., Albany County (Porter, 540), Porter, 1935. (As Eurhynchium diversifolium (Schleich) B. & S.) Albany Co., Porter, 1937. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994. ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mountains, Barber Lake Picnic area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, along Libby Creek, 8720-8740 ft, Pinus contorta forest; on soil, N. G. Miller 10, 258 (NYS) June 7, 1993. FREMONT CO.: F.X. Jozwik 482 (RM); fo. praecox (Hedw.) Crum, Steere & Andr. WESTON CO.: , PM Eckel 623686 (RM, BUF).  SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, sandstone rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley. July 5, 1985. shaded sandstone rock P. M. Eckel 9612522 (BUF) + Saionia uncinata, Brachythecium salebrosum, Leptodictyum humile, Platydictya jungermannioides.

 

There is a var. barnesii (Ren. & Card.) Grout [1990 checklist] as Eurhynchiastrum pulchellum var. barnesii   (Renauld & Cardot) Ignatov, but not yet known for Wyoming; its taxonomy is problematic (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014). Note form praecox is julaceous and resembles Brachythecium collinum, also julaceous, by the coarse serrations. The latter, however, has cells in the apices of all leaves that are elongate (greater than 2: 1). Eurhynchiastrum pulchellum is more broadly deltoid at the leaf base, B. collinum more ovate-lanceolate. The obtuse to broadly acute apices of the branch leaves are more characteristic of E. pulchellum.

 

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FISSIDENS Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 152. 1801  . (Fissidentaceae)

Moenkemeyera Müller Hal.; Octodiceras Bridel

 

Fissidens adianthoides Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 157. 1801  (Fissidentaceae) unillo

 

Fissidens adianthoides var. immarginatus Lesquereux & James 

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

On moist soil banks, logs, calcareous and noncalcareous rocks and cliffs. Throughout the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Northwest Territory, California; Ontario to Labrador and south to Arkansas and Florida. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

TETON CO.: Teton National Park, Taggart Lake, Aug. 13, 1953, E. Lawton, 1730 (WTU). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Crescent Hill, Aug. 17, 1953, E. Lawton, 1856 (WTU).

 

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Fissidens bryoides Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 153. 1801  (Fissidentaceae) unillo

 

Dicranum viridulum Sw.

Fissidens andersonii Grout (NYFA Vol. 27, 2007)

Fissidens bryoides var. incurvus (Starke) Hübener (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Fissidens bryoides var. pusillus (Wils.) Pursell (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Fissidens exiguus Sulliv. (FNA 2007)

Fissidens exiguus var. falcatulus (Ren. & Card.) Grout (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

[[Fissidens limbatus Sull.]]

[[Fissidens minutulus Sull.]]

Fissidens pusillus (Wils.) Milde (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Fissidens synoicous Sulliv. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Fissidens viridulus (Sw.) Wahlenb.

Fissidens viridulus var. texanus (Lesqu. & James) Grout (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

  NOTE: Fissidens minutulus Sull., often confused with F. bryoides, is a good species, occurring along and east of the Mississippi River (also California); Fissidens limbatus is a synonym of F. crispus (R. Pursell, pers. comm., Aug. 23, 2013). Fissidens crispus, with a western distribution, is to be expected in Wyoming.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In shaded areas, commonly on moist soil banks or on soil over logs and rocks, from the lowlands to 2000 m or higher. British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; California; South Dakota, Minnesota; Ontario to Maine and south to Texas and Florida.

 

ALBANY CO., in deep shade on wet, peaty, wooded bank of Nash Fork on Sand Lake Rd., 2 miles NW of Route 130, alt 8500 ft., Medicine Bow Mts., ca. 4 miles W. of Centennial, Aug. 5, 1962, c.fr., F.J. Hermann 17774 (RM, WTU). SHERIDAN CO.: On vertical rock face, moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 27, McKee 92-024 (RM), c.fr. mature, indehisced, June 16, 1992, with Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum, Didymodon vinealis [var. flaccida], Distichium capillaceum, Platydictya jungermannioides.

 

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Fissidens grandifrons Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl.1: 170. 1806  (Fissidentaceae) unillo

 

Pachyfissidens grandifrons (Brid.) Limpr.(NYFA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

On limestone, sometimes submerged, in streams, waterfalls, or other wet situations. British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, California, Utah, Nevada; Michigan and Ontario to New York, south to Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama. Junction of Nez Perces Creek with Firehole River, Yellowstone National Park (Porter, 1247). Very abundant at this locality, Porter, 1935.

 

SHERIDAN CO.: On rocks in streambed in rapidly flowing water, calcareous region, Dry Fork and Garland Gulch, T57N, R89W, McKee 92-043 & 92-044 June 22, 1992 (BUF, RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: along the Firehole River, on partly submerged rocks in a small stream, Aug. 5, 1932, C. L. Porter, 1247 (NY, WTU); Black Sand Basin, Aug. 18, 1953, E. Lawton, 1868 (WTU); calcareous rock bed of cascade from large spring along the Firehole River near Madison Junction, R. V. Drexler, Aug. 1936, 829 (NY); between Madison and Old Faithful, in western exposure, canyon, Pseudotsuga-Pinus contorta forest, 2320-50m, dripping water, Duell, Aug. 8, 1981 2267/4 (NY).

 

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Fissidens obtusifolius Wilson, London J. Bot. 4: 196, plate 9, fig. b. 1845  (Fissidentaceae) unillo

 

Fissidens obtusifolius var. kansanus Ren. & Card.  (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Fissidens obtusifolius var. marginatus Flowers (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mts., Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, 2400 m; limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus dominant, Buck, 23160 (NY), with Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum and Didymodon rigidulus var. gracilis. Apices too broad for var. apiculatus Grout, with variations on the same stem of costa ending to nine cells below the apex. The broad leaves are apiculate, but not broadly acute in all leaves. Note the intramarginal border in the lower leaves on the vaginant lamina, corresponding to the var. marginatus Flow. (p. 94 of that text). NEW There are vars. apiculatus Grout, var. kansanus Ren. & Card. and var. marginatus Flow. in 1990 checklist.

 

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Fissidens osmundioides Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 153, plate 40, figs. 7–11. 1801 (Fissidentaceae) unillo

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Teton Co., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

PARK CO.: west of Bear Tooth Butte, Crazy Creek campground, Aug. 22, 1953, E. Lawton, 2019 (WTU), det. R. Pursell. Note: costae end short of the apex, vaginant laminae long and broad, cells of vaginant laminae epapillose, rhizoids papillose (fide Pursell). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake Fissidens osmundoides Hedw., Richard Andrus 7795b (BING).

 

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Fissidens sublimbatus Grout, Moss Fl. N. Amer. 1: 13, plate 13, fig. A. 1936   (Fissidentaceae) unillo

 

Fissidens obtusifolius var. apiculatus Grout (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

A species of soil in the arid lowlands in Wyoming, “...often partially buried, often under overhanging rocks and boulders, and in the shade of trees and shrubs” (Ireland, FNA Vol. 27, 2007). It is found in the arid states, south of Wyoming, such as New Mexico and Arizona and “Indeed, it appears to be the only species of the genus found in Death Valley” (Ireland FNA).

 

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FONTINALIS Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 298. 1801 (Fontinalaceae)

 

Fontinalis antipyretica Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 298. 1801 Fontinalis. s.l. (Fontinalaceae)

 

Fontinalis allenii Cardot

Fontinalis antipyretica var. oreganensis Renauld & Cardot

Fontinalis antipyretica var. robusta Cardot

Fontinalis californica Sullivant

Fontinalis gigantea Sullivant

Fontinalis mollis Müller Hal.

Fontinalis patula Cardot

Fontinalis utahensis Cardot & Thériot

Pilotrichum antipyretica (Hedwig) Müller Hal. (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

[From earlier Wyoming checklist:]

Fontinalis antipyretica var. gigantea (Sull. ex Sull. & Lesq.) Sull.

Fontinalis antipyretica var. mollis (C. Muell.) Welch

Fontinalis antipyretica var. patula (Card.) Welch in Grout

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1529) (Roell 1893).

Medicine Bow Mts., Albany County (Aven Nelson, 9670), Porter, 1935. Fontinalis gigantea Sulliv. Albany County, Carbon County, and Sheridan County, Porter, 1935. (As Fontinalis antipyretica var. gigantea Sulliv.) Albany, Carbon, Sheridan cos., Porter, 1937. (As F. antipyretica var. mollis (C. Muell.) Welch) Albany, Carbon cos., Porter, l937. and Lawton). Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: small pond of cold water in spruce-fir forest at University of Wyoming Science Camp, Centennial, Dennings 1091 (WTU); swift streams, Medicine Bow Mts., Aven Nelson 9670 (RM), exsiccat Plants of Wyoming. CARBON CO.: submerged & partly floating in pool in marsh near North French Creek at logging road crossing, 8600 ft., Medicine Bow Mtns, 6 mile E of Ryan Park, Hermann 26719 (WTU); cold, shallow pool in meadow along North French Creek, Medicine Bow Mts alt. ca. 8500 ft. 6 miles E of Ryan Park, Hermann 17186 (RM), Aug. 19, 1961. PARK CO.: Bear Tooth Mts., Crane Lake, in water, attached to rocks, Welch 15079 (WTU). SUBLETTE CO.; 10,324 ft., H. Rolston 85127 (Colo.St.U.); also 10,5595 ft., H. Rolston 85099 (Colo.St.U.). 

 

(As Fontinalis antipyretica var. gigantea (Sull.) Sull.): ALBANY CO.: in the swift water of the stream, Centennial, Aven Nelson 8001, Aug. 7, 1900, exsiccat, det. Holzinger (RM). FREMONT CO.: in the Popo Agie River S of Lander, 5,200 ft. Richard W. Scott 883, July 30, 1966 (RM). SHERIDAN CO.: in spring bog, Aven Nelson 8521, July 29, 1901 (RM).

 

(As Fontinalis antipyretica var. oregonensis Ren. & Card.:)  (Var. oregonensis) Lincoln Gulch, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 2619), Porter, 1935. Albany Co., Porter, 1937. Lawton. ALBANY CO.: Lincoln Gulch, Aven Nelson 2619 (RM), Aug. 12, 1896. PARK CO.: west of Bear Tooth Butte along the clark Fork of the Yellowstone River, 6940 ft., Lawton, 2004 (WTU). In the sense of Flowers, p. 536, “keels of the leaves nearly straight above the basal curve, the leaf tips sometimes shortly and abruptly incurved.”

 

Fontinalis antipyretica var. duriaei (Schimp.) Husn. = Fontinalis hypnoides Hartman

 

Fontinalis antipyretica var hypnoides = Fontinalis hypnoides Hartman

 

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Fontinalis hypnoides Hartman, Handb. Skand. Fl. ed. 4, 434. 1843  (Fontinalaceae) unillo

 

Fontinalis dalecarlica var. macounii Cardot

Fontinalis duriaei Schimper

Fontinalis holzingeri Cardot

Fontinalis macmillanii Cardot

Fontinalis nitida Lindberg & Arnell

Fontinalis nitida var. angustiretis Cardot ex W. H. Welch

Fontinalis obscura Cardot

Fontinalis subcarinata Cardot

Fontinalis tenella (Cardot) Cardot

Fontinalis umbachii Cardot (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1554, 1582 and 1583) (Roell 1893).

 

(As Fontinalis hypnoides) Albany County and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. (As Fontinalis nitida Lindb. & Arn.) Moorcroft, Crook County (Aven Nelson, 2248), Porter, 1935. (As Fontinalis duriaei Schimp.) Sweetwater Co., Porter, 1937. (As Fontinalis nitida Lindb. & Arn.) Crook Co., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. (As var. hypnoides) ALBANY CO.; F.J. Hermann, 17781 (RM). (As var. hypnoides but sub duriaei) Little Laramie River, A.Nelson, No.3328 (RM). s.l. FREMONT CO.; 10,055 ft., H.Rolston, 86029 (Colo. St.U.). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 15/viii/1989 ca. 1/4 mile southwest of Barnes Lake, 9780 ft. elev., 42°59'N, 109°36'W. Floating in small lake with fen margin [leaves not keeled]. Richard Andrus 7814 (BING).

 

“Plants of F. antipyretica found in swiftly moving streams often have leaves completely split along the keel and can be mistaken for F. hypnoides” (Allen in FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Fontinalis antipyretica var. duriaei (Schimp.) Husn. ) (As Fontinalis duriaei Schimp.) N. Vermillion Creek, Sweetwater County (Aven Nelson, 3577). “No specimens of this plant could be found although it is recorded by Dr. Nelson (1900),” Porter, 1935. (As var. duriaei) North Vermillion Creek, A.Nelson No.3577 (RM).

 

(As Fontinalis antipyretica var. duriaei (Schimp.) Husn. ) ALBANY CO. E.C.& T.G.Yuncker 12370 (RM); 10,000 ft., F.J. Hermann No.17221 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: 2 mi. E of Fishing Bridge, Indian Pond, layered in the stack of diatom deposits about 20 ft. in height between Indian Pond and Yellowstone Lake, B. Shero, June 12, 1989 (BUF). v. discussion in Crum & Anderson p. 786.

 

(As Fontinalis antipyretica var. duriaei (Schimp.) Husn. ) Specimens that are “larger, laxer, and softer, with relatively broad leaves being the var. duriaei...smaller ones with relatively narrow leaves the var. hypnoides.” (Fontinalis hypnoides C.J. Hartm. var. hypnoides Albany Co., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.)

 

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Fontinalis neomexicana Sullivant & Lesquereux in W. S. Sullivant, Musc. Hepat. U.S., 224b. 1856 (as neo-mexicana)  (Fontinalaceae)

 

Fontinalis columbica Cardot

Fontinalis maritima Müller Hal.

Fontinalis mercediana Lesquereux (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Albany County, Johnson County, Sheridan County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Albany, Johnson, Sheridan cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.; 7800ft., F.J. Hermann 25931 (RM); A. Nelson No.7540 (RM); c.fr.July 10, A. Nelson No.7540 (RM). CARBON CO.; 9,200 ft., C.L.Porter No.9694 (RM). JOHNSON CO.; A. Nelson No.2506 (RM). Big Horn Mts. H.Hapemann Sept.1892 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, c.fr. Aug.6, A.&E.Nelson No.6320 (RM); A. & E. Nelson No.6293 (RM).

 

(As Fontinalis neomexicana var. columbica Cardot:) Spring Creek, Yellowstone National Park (Aven Nelson, 6293), Porter, 1935.

 

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FUNARIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 172. 1801  . (Funariaceae)

 

[Funaria flavicans Michaux, Fl. Bor.-Amer. 2: 303. 1803  (Funariaceae)

 Fl. Bor.-Amer., vol. 2 p. 303, 1803; probably excluded.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Centennial, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 8699); Dale Creek, Albany County (Porter, 712), Porter, 1935.

 

Crum & Anderson (1981) and FNA (2007) report this species to occur not west of Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska (Padunc. 469)]

 

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Funaria hygrometrica Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond.,172. 1801 var. hygrometrica (FNA 2007) (Funariaceae) unillo

 

[Synonymy from Crum & Anderson, 1981:)

Funaria convoluta Hampe

Funaria flaviseta Warnst. (FNA 2007)

Funaria hygrometrica var. B [beta] B.S.G.

Funaria hygrometrica var. patula Aust.

Funaria hygrometrica var. utahensis Grout (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park c.fr. (1493) (Roell 1893).  In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; throughout the US and Can., cosmopolitan. (As Funaria convoluta) French Creek, Carbon County (Goodding, 2029); (as F. hygrometrica) Albany, Sheridan, Sublette cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. (As var. utahensis )Albany, Carbon cos., Porter, 1937. (As var. utahensis) Wyoming, Flowers 1973.

 

ALBANY CO.: (as var. utahensis) Laramie, Elias Nelson 3453, c. fr. July 29, 1897. ALBANY CO.: Nelson, A. 3461 (RM). BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., north fork Crazy Woman Creek 13 air miles SW of Buffalo, limestone outcrops and rocky slopes, shaded streamside, aspen woodlands and meadows, 6800 ft., c. fr. operculate, 28 June 1979, R. L. Hartman 9708 (BUF, RM). CARBON CO.: (as var. utahensis )French Creek, Aug. 28, 1903 Goodding 2029 (RM), (as var. utahensis) wet ground in burnt alder patch (see Grout, Vol. 2 p. 85). JOHNSON CO.: T49N R 83W S22, Big Horn Mts. north fork Crazy Woman Creek, ca. 13 air miles SW of Buffalo; sec 22 & 27. Limestone outcrops and rocky slopes, shaded streamside, and aspen woodlands with adjacent meadows;  elev. 6800 ft., June 28, 1979, R. L. Hartman 9708 (RM). PARK CO.: 6100 ft., Vukelich April 1, 1988 (BUF). NATRONA CO.: Big Horn Mts., First Water Creek, dry creek bed and road crossing, 7700 ft., Hartman 10452, c. fr. operculate Aug. 1, 1979 (RM).

 

NOTE: the capsules in 3453 are short pyriform and uniformly smaller than the typical variety, as detailed by Flowers. A collection at RM in a packet of Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum approached the variety in the smallness of the capsules, except the tiniest range of the mouth was absent, and no spores were larger than 17 to 18 µm. The capsules were green and not furrowed. Since the operculum had dehisced and the spores appeared normal, one might assume the capsules were mature [Aven Nelson 1538 (RM), Albany Co. Cummins, July 30, 1895, with Hennediella heimii and Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum.

NOTE: Funaria hygrometrica var. calvescens (Schwaegr.) Montagne “seems to be a tropical expression of the species although it is known from a few southern states in the United States” (Miller & Miller, FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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GEMMABRYUM J. R. Spence & H. P. Ramsay, Phytologia 87: 63. 2005 (Bryaceae)

 

Gemmabryum caespiticium (Hedwig) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 91: 497. 2009 (Bryaceae) unillo

Bryum caespiticium Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 180. 1801

 

Ptychostomum imbricatulum (Müller Hal.) D T. Holyoak & N. Pederson (both FNA Vol. 28 (2014).

 

(Synonymy used earlier in this checklist:)

Bryum julaceum Kindb.

Bryum microcephalum C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum oligochloron C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum synoicocaespiticium C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Bryum vancouveriense Kindb. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Bryum caespiticium): Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1516, 1519) (Roell 1893).

(All as Bryum caespiticium) Widespread, almost cosmopolitan. Albany, Carbon Co., Uinta, Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994. ALBANY CO.: south bank of Little Brooklyn Lake, Medicine Bow Mtns., 10,300 ft., Schriever 17 (RM); (as Bryum provinciale Philib.) Medicine Bow Mts., Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7814), (RM, US), Porter, 1935 [see above discussion under that species]; (id'd as B. cirrhatum, but dioicous), Cummins, Aven Nelson 1538 (RM) - see Porter citation of this specimen below, c. fr. July 30, 1895, with Hennediella  heimii and Funaria hygrometrica. BIG HORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns., large rock outcrop, 9200 ft., Nelson 3332, c. fr. indehisced operculate, July 9, 1979 (BUF, RM), with Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum. CARBON CO.: Pedro Mts., L. N. Goodding 115 (RM, US); Plants of Wyoming, Bridger Peak, Goodding, 1966 of the exsiccat, det. by Holzinger (as B. occidentale Sull.) (RM, US). FREMONT CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest on US26 & US287, between Moran & Dubois, ca. 9000'. Alpine meadow, much herbage. Wet with flowing streams. Granite outcrops. N slopes of knoll, with Tortula ruralis, Encalypta vulgaris var. rhabdocarpa, Eckel 93081102 (BUF), c. fr. SUBLETTE CO.: 7950 ft., F. J. Hermann 25344 (RM). UINTA CO.: Fort Bridger, Nelson 4595, c. fr. June 8, 1898 (young) (RM); Evanston, on dry ground, c. fr., Degener 17,074, July 8, 1942 (US). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Yellowstone Lake, in a wet draw, c. young fr. Aug. 23, 1899, Nelson 6640 (RM, US); Blacktail Deer Creek, on ground, Aug. 1, 1888, c.fr., Knowlton, s.n. (US).

 

(As Bryum caespiticium) Smith (1978) gives a good illustration of the abruptly acuminate apex. Note that this character is evident at least on some of the leaves (otherwise this is not definitely demonstrable). In the Big Horn Co. specimen, this species was growing with Bryoerythrophyllum recurvirostrum in a harsh habitat. Both taxa were capable of growing from robust down to tiny buttons in the sand - I have not found Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum, the other weedy taxon so like B. caespiticium, to be capable of this diminution of size. The Bryoerythrophyllum can also get down. Another specimen from Big Horn Co. shows that this taxon, when depauperate, has a short, ropy habit with a gristled appearance, like the stem tips are little curling steel wires. In fruit, the fertile stem is a bulb in the sand, the innovations on red stalks with bulblike leaf-wrap. The colors are a Christmas red and green. It seems most of the weedy things I've been looking at are synoicous - this one is refreshingly dioicous. Its costa is significantly longer than the other weedy things. It has a weak border.

 

More robust specimens are different, unfortunately, but the stem is usually shorter (under 1 cm) than the run of common Bryums. I find the leaf cells can be quite thick. Crum gives an excellent description of this plant - the operculum can be quite apiculate with a prominent nipple at the tip. Note that the description of B. caespitosa with linear cells in the apex is a characteristic of the sterile stems: the fertile ones have shorter cells and shorter awns [is this also true in Rosulabryum capillare]. [Both caespitosum and lisae may have bright orange setae.] The specimen of Goodding 1966 seen from both RM and US had numerous small innovations that might be taken as bulbils. One might usually expect innovations as branchings but in Goodding's specimens they appeared to be free and developing from rhizoids or generally unattached or readily deciduous from any main stem (cf. B. canariense: “with short axillary branches becoming detached and acting as asexual reproductive structures). These apparent branchlets are in fact stems and may carry the male organs: in B. pallescens, the side axes are actually branches, without rhizoids, and so the plant is autoicous (caespitosa is dioicous). The leaves of sterile stems all had regularly excurrent costae, just as those of the fertile stems. The capsules were variable from under 2 mm to nearly three mm, none of them red - characters not associated with Bryum dichotomum (see below). Note the variability of the capsule sizes, as recognized in Flower's description of the species, from below 1 to 3 mm.

 

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Gemmabryum dichotomum (Hedwig) J. R. Spence & H. P. Ramsay, Phytologia 87: 66. 2005  (Bryaceae) unillo

Bryum dichotomum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 183, plate 42, figs. 8–12. 1801

 

Bryum  bicolor Dickson

Gemmabryum bicolor (Dickson) J. R. Spence [all FNA Vol. 28, 2014]

 

(Synonymy from earlierWyoming checklist, as Bryum dichotomum Hedw.:) Bryum bicolor Dicks. fid. Andrews in Grout [Bryum bicolor = Bryum dichotomum Hedw., Anderson et al. 1990]

Bryum occidentale Sull. = B. bicolor Dicks. [Index Muscorum]

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014), but widespread, occurring in the western states and to be anticipated.

 

(As Bryum dichotomum) Teton Co., Spence 1985.]

 

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Grimmia affinis Hornsch. = Grimmia longirostris Hooker

 

Grimmia agassizii (Sull. & Lesq. in Sull.) Jaeg. = Schistidium agassizii Sullivant & Lesquereux

 

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GRIMMIA Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 75. 1801   (Grimmiaceae)

Dryptodon Bridel; Hydrogrimmia (I. Hagen) Loeske

 

Grimmia alpestris (Weber & Mohr) Schleicher, Cat. Pl. Helv. ed. 2, 29. 1808  . (Grimmiaceae) unillo

Trichostomum pulvinatum var. alpestre Weber & Mohr, Bot. Taschenbuch, 110. 1807

 

Grimmia donniana var. alpestris (Weber & Mohr) Hampe

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, Vol. 27,)

 

Grimmia alpicola Hedwig = Schistidium agassizii Sullivant & Lesquereux

 

Grimmia alpicola auct. Amer. = Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp.

 

Grimmia alpicola var. latifolia (Zett.) Mill. = Schistidium rivulare (Brid.) Podp.

 

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Grimmia anodon Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 110. 1845 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia anodon var. anomala Bartr.

Grimmia subanodon Ochyra (FNA 2007)

Schistidium anodon (B.S.G.) Loeske

Schistidium obtusifolium Ireland & Crum (FNA 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and prov. of the P. Nw.; Yukon, Cal., Ariz. N. M., Nev., Utah, Colo., N. Dakota.

 

Telephone Canyon, Albany Co. (Porter, 1014); Long Canyon, Albany Co (Rollins, 61), Porter, 1935. Yellowstone/Teton localities are given in a map by Ireland & Miller (1982). Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: Laramie Mtns, Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, Co. Rd. 17, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck, 23169 (NY), c. fr. with lids, June 7, 1993; along Roger Canyon in the Laramie Mtns, 7 mi. due NE of Laramie city center, Artemesia scrub vegetation; limestone cliffs and outcrops, 7,600 ft., vertical seeping crack in limestone cliff, W. D. Reese 18158 (LAF) June 7, 1993 with Orthotrichum hallii; Laramie Mountains, Roger Canyon, 7 air miles NE of Laramie city center, limestone outcrops with Cerocarpus montanus, Artemisia cava, A. tripartita, A. nova, A. tridentata; on thin soil over bedrock, n. G. Miller 10,234 (NYS) June 7, 1993, c. fr.; crevices in quartz boulder on open slope above Univ. of Wyo. Science Camp., 9800 ft, Medicine Bow Mtns., 7.8 miles NW of Centennial, Hermann 23426 (RM), Sept. 1, 1970. FREMONT CO.: on limestone outcrip, Douglas fir slope, 1/2 mile E of Horse Creek Campground, 7800 ft. Absaroka Range 11 miles N of Dubois, Hermann 25531 (RM), Aug. 28, 1973. PLATTE CO.: PM Eckel 1020386 (RM).

 

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Grimmia anomala Hampe in W. P. Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur. ed. 2, 270. 1876 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Dryptodon anomalus (Hampe) Loeske

Grimmia anomala Hampe in Schimp.

Grimmia elatior subsp. anomala (Hampe) Kindb.

Grimmia hartmanii var. anomala (Hampe) Moenk.

Grimmia pachyneurula Müller Hal & Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia philibertiana Britt.

Grimmia phyllantha Lindb. in Broth.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Co., Wash., Alberta, Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Michigan. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

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Grimmia apocarpa Hedw.= Schistidium apocarpum (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G.

 

[Grimmia apocarpa var. conferta (Funck) Spreng. = Schistidium apocarpum (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G.]

 

[Grimmia apocarpa var. stricta (Turn.) Hook. & Tayl. = Schistidium apocarpum (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G.

 

[Grimmia atricha C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun & Kindb. = Schistidium apocarpum (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. in B.S.G. ]

 

Grimmia calyptrata Hook. in Drumm. = Coscinodon calyptratus (Hook. in Drumm.) C. Jens. ex Kindb.

 

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Grimmia donniana Smith in J. E. Smith et al., Engl. Bot. 18: plate 1259. 1804 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Grimmia donniana is widespread but relatively uncommon and sporadic along the front ranges of the Rocky Mountains from Alberta south to southern Utah and Colorado” (Hastings & Greven in FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Johnson Co., Porter, 1937. Uinta Co., Wynne 1943.

 

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Grimmia dupretii Thér. = Schistidium dupretii (Thér.) W. A. Weber

 

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Grimmia elatior Bruch ex Balsamo-Crivelli & De Notaris, Mem. Reale Accad. Sci. Torino 40: 340. 1838 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Dryptodon incurvus (Hornsch.) Brid.

Grimmia cognata Card. & Thér. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia elatior subsp. rufescens Kindb.

Grimmia funalis var. robusta De. Not.

Grimmia grandis Kindb. (FNA 2007)

Grimmia papillosa (Warnst.) Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Rhacomitrium incurvum (Hornsch.) Hueb.

Trichostomum incurvum Hornsch.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Mont., Wyoming; Colo. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: 7800 ft., H.J. Hermann, 25924 (RM). PARK CO.: 3250 msm, W. A. Weber Aug. 21, 1973. TETON CO. 7,000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25553 (RM).

 

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[Grimmia funalis (Schwägrichen) Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3: 119, fig. 247. 1845 .  excluded]

 

Grimmia calvescens Kindberg

Grimmia imberbis Kindberg

Grimmia ryanii Limpricht

Grimmia spiralis Hooker

Trichostomum funale Schwägrichen (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) where the distribution is north-south from above the arctic circle south to Louisiana in a line of less than 10 sites.

 

(As Grimmia funalis Schwg.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Upper Falls (1478) (Roell 1893).

 

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Grimmia hartmanii var. anomala (Hampe ex Schimp.) Moenk. = Grimmia anomala Hampe ex Schimp.

 

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Grimmia laevigata (Bridel) Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 1: 183. 1826  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

Campylopus laevigatus Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 4: 76. 1818

 

Grimmia campestris Burchell ex Hook.

Grimmia glauca Gardot (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia leucophaea Grev.

Grimmia sarcocalyx Kindb. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wash., Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming; Cal. Nev., Utah, Ariz, N. Mexico; widespread in the Mid. West and in the eastern states from NY to New Jersey to Fla.

 

Grimmia glauca Card. Albany Co., Porter, 1937 may be a citation of G. laevigata following Crum and Anderson's synonymy: p. 424; G. glauca sensu Jones in Grout, Moss Fl. Amer., vol. 2(1), p. 24, 1940, non Card. 1905. (As Grimmia glauca Card.) “A rare plant, this being one of the four known collections in the United States. On metamorphosed limestone rocks, Long Canyon, Albany County (Rollins, 60),” Porter, 1935.

 

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Grimmia longirostris Hooker, Musci Exot. 1: plate 62. 1818 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia affinis Hornsch.

Grimmia arctophila subsp. labradorica Kindb.

Grimmia catalinensis var. mutica Bartr.

Grimmia elata Kindb.

Grimmia ortholoma Kindb.

Grimmia ovalis var. affinis (Hornsch.) Broth.

Grimmia ovata var. affinis (Hornsch.) Bruch & Schimp.

Grimmia ovateoformis [sic] Kindb. (all FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Synonymy for Grimmia affinis Hoppe & Hornsch. ex Hornsch. in prior list:

Grimmia catalinensis Bartr.

Grimmia ovata var. affinis (Hornsch.) B.S.G.

 

(As Grimmia affinis) British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico; South Dakota, Minnesota.

 

(All as Grimmia affinis) ALBANY CO.: Elias Nelson 5243 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: on shaded boulder under spruce on W shore of Lower Green River Lake, 7950 ft. Wind River Range, 50 miles N of Pinedale, Hermann 25323 (RM) June 19, 1973. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Bartley & Pontious 13 (RM).

 

(As Grimmia affinis) The specimen 25323 looked like G. ovalis (long basal cells, sinuose median cells, moderately toothed hairpoint) but it keyed to G. affinis (second reference in Lawton's key) through the keeled leaves recurved on one side. This species is difficult to distinguish from Grimmia pulvinata except it has a straight seta and that of the latter is arcuate (at least when moist, as they say). Grimmia affinis has basal cells that are not “subquadrate to short rectangular” but longer, getting shorter toward the margins and thinner-walled. Both are variably thick-sinuose - these characters are best seen in older leaves. Grimmia affinis has occasional “subcuculate” calyptrae, otherwise both are mitrate. The basal cells of Grimmia pulvinata are rather homogeneously thin-walled, that of Gr. affinis variable: longer and thicker toward the costa becoming shorter and thinner on the margins. Both with thickened cross-walls on the marginal two or three lengths of cells. Bistratose patches on the lamina, in addition to bistratose margins.

 

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Grimmia montana Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 3. 128. 1845  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia arctophila Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia brachydon Austin (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia jamesii Aust.

Grimmia montana var. brachydon (Austin) Lesqu. & James (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia montana var. idahensis Ren. & Card. in Card. & Thér.

Grimmia pseudomontana Card. & Thér.

Grimmia tenella Müller Hal. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Guembelia montana (B.S.G) Hampe in C. Muell.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park 7000’, (1467), Lower Geyser (1462, 1465) Upper Falls (1464, 1471) (Roell 1893).

In all states and prov. of the P. Nw; Cal. Nev. Utah, Colo. Albany County (Porter, 1011); Sublette County (Porter, 1125 & 1127); Teton County (Porter, 1171); and Tower Falls, Yellowstone National Park (collector unknown), Porter 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8,000 ft. F.J. Hermann 17721 (RM). PARK CO.: 7500 ft. F.J. Hermann (RM).

 

Grimmia occidentalis Lawton = Schistidium occidentale (Lawton) Churchill

 

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Grimmia ovalis (Hedwig) Lindberg, Acta Soc. Sci. Fenn. 10: 75. 1871 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

Dicranum ovale Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 140. 1801

 

Dicranum ovale Hedw.

Grimmia commutata Hueb.

Grimmia ovata Web. & Mohr

Grimmia ovata var. gracilis Röll (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Grimmia ovata) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Upper Falls (1459) (Roell 1893).

Note in Crum & Anderson p. 4331 sub Grimmia affinis the following synonymy: G. ovalis sensu Jones in Grout, Moss Fl. Amer., vol.2 p. 33, 11933, non (Hedw.) Lindb. 1871) - but see Mexican Flora where it appears. Brit. Colo., Wash., Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Nev. Ariz. (As Grimmia commutata) Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5243); near Pinedale, Sublette Co. (Porter, 1126), [as Grimmia ovalis: Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park], Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: Sheep Mt., on dry cliffs, L. N. Goodding 2101 (RM), exsiccat Plants of Wyoming. PLATTE CO.: PM Eckel 1420386 (RH, BUF).

 

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Grimmia plagiopodia Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 78, plate 15, figs. 6–13. 1801 (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia brandegeei Austin (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia obtusa Brid.

Schistidium plagiopodium (Hedw.) Loeske

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Brit. Colo., Oregon, Alberta, Mont., Wyoming; Ariz., New Mex., Colo.; S. Dakota, Iowa, Ohio, Maryland. Sweetwater Co., Weston Co., Wynne 1943.

 

NIOBRARA CO.: 4000 ft., F.J. Hermann, 25355 (RM). WESTON CO.: PM Eckel 823686 (RM, BUF).

 

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Grimmia pulvinata (Hedwig) Smith in J. E. Smith et al., Engl. Bot. 24: plate 1728. 1807  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

Fissidens pulvinatus Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 158, plate 40, figs. 1–3. 1801

 

Campylopus pulvinatus (Hedw.) Brid.

Dryptodon pulvinatus (Hedw.) Brid.

Fissidens pulvinatus Hedw.

Grimmia decipiens var. hendersonii (Ren. & Card.) Sayre (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia hendersoni Ren. & Card.

Grimmia indianensis (Sayre) H. A. Crum (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia pulvinata var. africana Hook. f. & Wils. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia subcurvula Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia trichophylla var. indianensis Sayre (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and prov. of the Pacific Northwest; Cal., Nev., Utah, Ariz.; TX, Iowa, Missouri, Maryland. Carbon Co., Wynne 1943.

 

ALBANY CO.: 8700, F.J. Hermann 24863 (RM). PARK CO.: granite outcrop along road ca. 11 miles SE of Rte. 212, Shoshone Natl. Forest, 33 miles NW of Cody, Hermann 20025 (RM), July 19, 1965. JOHNSON CO.: on the rocks in the shade of pines, Middle Fork of Powder River, Leslie N. Goodding 263 (RM), July 16, 1901.

 

The setae are arcuate when dry - a plant of specimen 20025 developed a straight seta on drying. The awns are conspicuously long, as long as the leaves, and the basal cells rather thin to hyaline and not at all or somewhat sinuose. There is a var. africana (Hedw.) Hook.f. in the 1990 checklist. See Grimmia affinis for discussion with regard to its distinction from this species.

 

Grimmia tenera Zett. = Schistidium tenerum (Zett.) Nyh.

 

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Grimmia sessitana De Notaris, Atti Reale Univ. Genova 1: 704. 1869  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Grimmia subpapillinervis Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia tenerrima Ren. & Card. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Synonymy for Grimmia tenerrima Ren. & Card. in previous list:

Grimmia alpestris (Web. & Mohr) Schleich. ex Hornsch. var. alpestris

Grimmia alpestris (Web. & Mohr) Schleich. ex Nees

Guembelia alpestris (Web. & Mohr) Hampe in C. Muell.

Trichostomum pulvinatum var. alpestris Web. & Mohr

 

(As Grimmia tenerrima) In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest; California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Colorado; Labrador, Quebec. (As Grimmia alpestris Schleich.) Fairly common. Albany, Big Horn, Sublette, Sweetwater, Teton [& Washakie] cos., Porter, 1935. (As Grimmia alpestris) “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981.

 

(All as Grimmia tenerrima) ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mts., Silver Lake, growing on granitic boulder in open area, infrequent, 9,000 ft. Lichvar 1338 (RM), Sept. 24, 1977. FREMONT CO.: soil pocket on boulder in open woods on slope, W shore of Fiddler's Lake (Wyo. Rte131), 9300 ft., 22 miles SSW of Lander, Hermann 25296 (RM), June 18, 1973. LINCOLN CO.: on granite boulder on slope above Salt River, Silver Stream Motel, 6000 ft., 11 miles N of Ashton, Hermann 17842 (RM) Aug. 11, 1962. PLATTE CO: PM Eckel 920386 (RH), according to a det. by McIntosh. SUBLETTE CO.: on boulder in open spruce- pine woods, W shore of Lower Green River Lake, Wind River Range, alt. 7850ft., 50 miles N of Pinedale, Hermann 25315 (RM), June 19, 1973; south fork of Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,290 ft., on damp rock at edge of fen, 42°59'N, 109°34'W, R. Andrus 7833a (BING, BUF) Aug. 16, 1989, with Didymodon umbrosus.

 

(As Grimmia tenerrima) These are of the smaller group of Grimmias, dark with awns that are frequently decurrent along the lamina at the apex of the leaf. What is very striking are the basal margin cells, quadrate with thicker crosswalls than the longitudinal walls. They have two layers of cells at the apex, double layers at the margins medially with patches of bistratose lamina. It is useful to make cross sections of these leaves to verify they are not recurved, but only have thickened marginal cells due to several layers of cells. The leaves are keeled toward the leaf tips in many leaves - other leaves lie flat. Grimmia tenerrima is “our most common species of Grimmia in the higher mountains of Utah” according to Flowers, and it is usually sterile, which is somewhat unusual in a Grimmia, so if you have extensive material in your specimen and it is sterile, check to see if it is glaucous, that is, if it has a bluish cast. It has hairpoints and is dioicous. The costa is terete in the sense that it is well set off from (not confluent with) the lamina), but is somewhat flattened in longitudinal axis. There is a sharp little groove on the topside of the costa, and this can be seen on the leaves lying flat up at you: the costa is nested in a channel. The leaves are keeled.

 

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Grimmia tenerrima Ren. & Card. = Grimmia sessitana DeNotaris

 

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Grimmia torquata Drummond, Musc. Scot. 2: no. 28. 1825  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Dryptodon torquatus (Hornsch.) Brid.

Grimmia pellucida Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia prolifera C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Grimmia pseudotorquata Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Grimmia tortifolia Kindb. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and prov. of the Pacific Northwest; Alaska, Cal., Nev., Colo., Ontario, Greenland. (Grimmia torquata Hornsch. Fruiting plants were collected in Wyoming by Roell in 1893, Yellowstone National Park, 7000’ (1439 p.p., 1440 p.p.) “the specimen from Yellowstone has only a single tall capsule” ( Roell 1893), Porter, 1937.)

 

SUBLETTE CO.: 10,348 ft., Holmes Rolston III 85133 (CSU).

 

There is a var. flettii (Holz.) Vaar. in 1990 checklist.

 

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Grimmia trichophylla Greville, Fl. Edin., 235. 1824  (Grimmiaceae) unillo

 

Dryptodon trichophyllus (Grev.) Brid.

Grimmia californica Sull. in Whipple

Grimmia canadensis Kindb.

Grimmia cognata Card. & Thér.

Grimmia densa Kindb. in Macoun

Grimmia depilata Kindb. in Macoun

Grimmia leibergii Paris

Grimmia pachyphylla Leib.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

Brit. Colo., Wash., Oregon, Idaho, Mont., Wyoming; Cal. Nev. Hawk's Ranch, Albany County (Aven Nelson, in 1930), [Johnson Co.]; Jenny Lake, Teton County (Porter, 1206), Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

Grimmia wrightii (Sull.) Aust. = Jaffueliobryum wrightii (Sull. in Gray) Thér.

 

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GYMNOSTOMUM Nees & Hornschuch in C. G. D. Nees et al., Bryol. Germ. 1: 112.

1823, name conserved   (Pottiaceae)

 

Gymnostomum aeruginosum Smith, Fl. Brit. 3: 1163. 1804  (Pottiaceae)

 

Anoectangium arizonicum E. B. Bartram (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

Gymnostomum clintonii Austin (FNA 2007).

Gymnostomum rupestre Schleich. ex Schwaegr.

Gymnostomum tophaceum Austin

Weisia rupestris (Schwaegr.) C. Muell.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

In all states and provinces of the Pacific Northwest but not common; Alaska, California, Nevada, Arizona; Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ontario; Quebec, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee.

 

BIG HORN CO. 8800' Hartman & Odasz 9146 (RM). PARK CO.: 2324-2350 msm, Duell 2269.4 (BUF). WASHAKIE CO.: On limestone boulders in a shady canyon, Ten Sleep Canyon, Big Horn Mts. 8,000 ft., Sept. 9, 1935, C.L. Porter, 2094 (see discussion sub G. calcareum). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: near Gardner River, Aug. 16, 1953, E. Lawton, 1819 (WTU).

 

[Gymnostomum calcareum Nees & Hornsch. in Nees et al. (Pottiaceae)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007) and probably not found there.

 

Washakie Co., Porter, 1937. Probably G. aeruginosum, v. discussion p. 285 in Crum & Anderson, North American citations perhaps juvenile forms of G. aeruginosum. This species occurs in southern California. The specimen from WTU of Porter, Sept. 9, 1935, 2094, “On limestone boulders in a shady canyon” from the Ten Sleep Canyon in the Big Horn Mts, WASHAKIE, CO., has been determined to be Gymnostomum aeruginosum by R. Zander. The specimen in section shows a ventral costal epidermis, two stereid bands, a central strand in the stem. The capsules were young and so rather ovoid. ]

 

Gymnostomum curvirostre Hedw. ex Brid. = Hymenostylium recurvirostre (Hedw.) Dix.

 

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HEDWIGIA P. Beauvois, Mag. Encycl. 5: 304. 1804, name conserved . (Hedwigiaceae)

 

Hedwigia ciliata (Hedwig) P. Beauvois, Prodr. Aethéogam., 15. 1805  (Hedwigiaceae)

Anictangium ciliatum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 40. 1801    

 

Anictangium ciliatum Hedwig

Hedwigia ciliata subsp. subnuda Kindberg

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Hawk's Ranch, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 7500). This plant is very common just to the south, entering Wyoming only at the extreme southern edge, Porter 1937.

 

CROOK CO.: 4350 feet, 1676 (RM, BUF).

 

Helodium blandowii F. Weber & D. Mohr = Elodium blandowii (F. Weber & D. Mohr) Eckel

 

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HENNEDIELLA Paris, Actes Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, sér. 5, 9: 232. 1895 (Pottiaceae)

Hennedia R. Brown bis, Trans. & Proc. New Zealand Inst. 25: 285. 1893, not Hennedya Harvey

1855

 

Hennediella heimii (Hedwig) R. H. Zander, Bull. Buffalo Soc. Nat. Sci. 32: 248. 1993  (Pottiaceae)

Gymnostomum heimii Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 32. 1801  

 

? var. cylindrica Br. in Porter, 1935.

Desmatodon heimii (Hedw.) Mitt. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

 

Gymnostomum heimii Hedw. (FNA Vol. 27, 2007)

Pottia heimii (Hedw.) Fürnr.

Pottia heimioides Kindb. in Macoun

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

(As Desmatodon heimii) British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Yukon, California, Nebada, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado; Saskatchewan, Manitoba; Quebec, New Brunswick.

 

(All as Desmatodon heimii) Antelope Basin, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7485), [Sublette cos.], Porter, 1935. [as var. cylindrica Br. Centennial, Albany Co. (Aven Nelson, 7976); Plumbago Canyon, Albany County (Porter, 490), Porter, 1935. (As Pottia heimioides Kindb. Centennial, Plumbago Canyon, and Libby Creek, all in Albany County; Pinedale, Sublette County, Porter, 1935).

 

(All as Desmatodon heimii) ALBANY CO.: Nelson 7484b (Holzinger) in with Rosulabryum capillare specimen, exsiccat (RM); “cylindrica” Centennial, A. Nelson, 7976 (RM); NW base of Sheep Mtn along Wy11, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23239 (NY), June 7 1993, young skinny green capsules and old year: probably ripen at end of month; in packet of Bryum caespiticium (RM), Aven Nelson 1538, Cummins, with Funaria hygrometrica; ca. 4 air miles E-SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mountain along WY11, 7700-7900 ft. Populus, Betula, and Salix associated with spring seep; on soil bank N. G. Miller 10,269 (NYS) June 7, 1993, with Leptobryum pyriforme and Campylium chrysophyllum. SUBLETTE CO.: Eckel, 1985. SWEETWATER CO.: Ca. 6,400' on US (187)191, at 14-Mile Reservoir picnic area in Artemisia scrubland, moist shaded ravine over brook, with Leptobryum pyriforme and Campylium chrysophyllum, July 5, l985, Eckel 412086 (BUF, RH).

 

There is also a [Desmatodon heimii] variety var. arctica (Lindb.) Crum = Hennediella heimii var. arctica (Lindb.) R. H. Zander, not in Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

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HETEROCLADIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 151, plates 479, 480. 1852  (Pterigynandraceae)

 

Heterocladium dimorphum (Bridel) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 153. 1852  (Pterigynandraceae)

Hypnum dimorphum Bridel, Muscol. Recent., suppl. 2: 149. 1812  

 

Heterocladium squarrosulum (Voit) Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: along Firehole River near Old Faithful Geyser, rotten wood, T.C.Frye, July 6, 1934 (BUF).

 

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HOMALOTHECIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 91, plates 456, 457. 1851 (Brachytheciaceae)

Camptothecium Schimper; Camptothecium sect. Trachybryum Brotherus; Trachybryum (Brotherus) W. B. Schofield

 

HOMALOTHECIUM

Sometimes Brachythecium salebrosum can be deeply and multi-plicate, resembling a species of this genus. However, all species in Homalothecium are dioicous.

 

The three species of the genus in Wyoming have no (or seldom have) recurved teeth near the leaf base (although the margins may be denticulate), the basal laminal cells are in only 1-3(-5) rows (not 5-8 rows) and the distal laminal cells on the abaxial surface of the leaf are smooth (not prorate). They are regularly (not unequally) pinnate and the branch leaves, when dry, are generally appressed (not erect and somewhat spreading).

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Homalothecium aeneum (Mitten) E. Lawton, Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 92: 351. 1965 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum aeneum Mitten, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 8: 31, plate 5 [lower left]. 1864  

 

Homalothecium nevadense var. aeneum (Mitten) Heike Hofmann (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Camptothecium aeneum (Mitt.) Jaeg.

Camptothecium aeneum subsp. dolosum Ren. & Card.

Camptothecium aeneum var. dolosum (Ren. & Card.) Grout

Hypnum aeneum Mitt.

 

Wyoming; “The ranges of both taxa [+ H. nevadense] are almost identical, although H. aeneum is more common in the northern part of their range and H. nevadense in the south.  The two species are distinguished mainly by sporophytic characters, and sterile collections are usually difficult to interpret” (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Camptothecium aeneum (Mitt.) J. & S.) Albany County, Carbon County, Crook County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. (As Camptothecium aeneum (Mitt.) Jaeg. & Sauerb.) Albany, Catron, Crook, Sheridan cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

 

PARK CO.: thin soil over dry, shaded rock under open canopy of Douglas-fir, at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station. 6,600 ft, J. C. Elliott 1791 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. SHERIDAN CO.: Reed C. Rollins 362 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone Park, on moist ground, Nelson 6041, printed label Plants of Wyoming (c. fr. July 21, 1899) (US, RM).

 

The Mammoth Springs specimen was det. by Holzinger as Camptothecium lutescens B.&S. (Homalothecium fulgescens), but I have redetermined it as H. aeneum based on leaves to 2 mm only, many leaves broadly acute, short capsule (endostome probably eroded) and abundant (exsiccat) material on soil, not on the trees typical of H. fulgescens (Lawton).

 

Homalothecium aureum (Spruce) H. Robinson, Bryologist 65: 96. 1963 (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Isothecium aureum Spruce, Musci Pyren., 145. 1847    

 

Isothecium aureum Spruce

Camptothecium amesiae Renauld & Cardot

Homalothecium pinnatifidum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) E. Lawton

 

(As Camptothecium pinnatifidum (S.& L.) J. & S.) Mammoth, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935. (As Camptothecium pinnatifidum (Sull. & Lesq.) Jaeg. & Sauerb). Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

 

(As Homalothecium pinnatifidum) SHERIDAN CO.: moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-001 (BUF, RM), with Ditrichum capillaceum, Hypnum pratense.

 

“The species can be recognized in the field by numerous, slightly curved branches that are conspicuously equal in length, and have closely julaceous foliage. The main microscopic diagnostic feature is the numerous quadrate alar cells, each relatively large, having clear outlines and only slightly incrassate walls, and arranged in rows parallel to the leaf margins.” (Ignatov in (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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[Homalothecium lutescens (Hedw.) H. Robinson (synonym Camptothecium lutescens (Hedw.) Schimp. in B.S.G.) is a Eurasian species (Ignatov, FNA Vol. 28, 2014):

[As Camptothecium lutescens (Huds.) B. & S.] Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

Excluded from the North American flora by Crum et al., l973. (As Camptothecium lutescens) Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park (Aven & Elias Nelson, 6041), Porter, 1935. The specimens, upon reexamination, may be compared to Homalothecium fulgescens (Mitten ex Müller Hal.) A. Jaeger.]

 

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Homalothecium nevadense (Lesquereux) Renauld & Cardot, Bot. Gaz. 13: 202. 1888  (Brachytheciaceae) unillo

Hypnum nevadense Lesquereux, Mem. Calif. Acad. Sci. 1: 33. 1868  

 

Homalothecium nevadense var. subulatum Ren. & Card. in Roell

Homalothecium sericeoides C. Muell. & Kindb. in Macoun

Hypnum nevadense Lesq.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

PARK CO.: granite outcrop on bank of Crandall Creek, alt. 6500 ft., Shoshone Natl. Forest, 36 miles NW of Cody, Hermann 20038 (US); dry, shaded rock under open canopy of Douglas-fir, at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft., J. C. Elliott 1783 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990.

 

This specimen [ 20038] is named without capsules. A sheet with several specimens of this species, none with capsules, was seen from US and identified by Lawton and Hermann. How did they do it? Because H. nevadense is generally pinnatifid (see Grout: this character distinguished H. nevadense from its congeners at the time. Pinnatifid taxa in his Camptothecium were either of the coast states and “more delicate”, or had blunt branch leaves (C. megaptilum) or with spines at the tip of the costa (illustrated by Grout and not in the present specimen). Note Lawton does not mention any particular pinnate branching. (C. alsioides, H. arenarium in Lawton, a species of the coast, according to that author, where the species also has “four to six rows of basal leaf cells similar to alar cells, short, broad, about 17 X 8 µm, walls thick and pitted, etc.; also Grout says C. alsioides is broader, H. nevadense “all the leaves are very narrowly lanceolate). The Park Co. specimen had smooth costae. Note that the basal angles were somewhat excavate and decurrent; Grout mentions decurrent cells. See great description by Flowers p.455

 

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Homalothecium nitens (Hedw.) Robins. = Tomentypnum nitens (Hedw.) Loeske

 

Homalothecium pinnatifidum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) E. Lawton = Homalothecium aureum (Spruce) H. Robinson

 

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Hygroamblystegium noterophilum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Warnstorf = Hygroamblystegium varium subsp. noterophilum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Vanderpoorten & Hedenäs

 

Hygroamblystegium tenax (Hedw.) Jenn. = Hygroamblystegium varium (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer var. varium

 

HYGROAMBLYSTEGIUM Loeske, Moosfl. Harz., 298. 1903, name conserved (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Hygroamblystegium varium  (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer, Hedwigia 50: 275. 1911 (as Hygramblystegium)  (Amblystegiaceae)

Leskea varia Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 216, plate 53, figs. 15–20. 1801

 

Amblystegium varium (Hedwig) Lindberg

 

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Hygroamblystegium varium (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer subsp. varium (Amblystegiaceae)

 

(As Amblystegium varium) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1533) (Roell 1893).

(As Amblystegium varium (Hedw.) Lindb.)  Ferris Mts., Carbon Co. (Aven Nelson, 4979), Porter, 1935.

 

(As Amblystegium varium (Hedw.) Lindb.) ALBANY CO.: 8500 ft., F. J. Hermann 17776 (RM); Medicine Bow Mts, Medicine Bow National Foreset, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air mi NW of Centennial, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, Buck 23205 (NY).

 

The Hermann specimen has decidedly serrate margins and somewhat inflated alar cells. The Buck specimen has serrate margins, especially at the base, evidence of channeling in the acumen but with marvelously inflated excavate basal cells!

 

Hygroamblystegium varium (Hedwig) Mönkemeyer var. varium (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Amblystegium fluviatile (Hedwig) Schimper

Amblystegium tenax (Hedwig) C. E. O. Jensen

Amblystegium trichopodium (Schultz) Hartman

Hygroamblystegium fluviatile (Hedwig) Loeske

Hygroamblystegium humile (P. Beauvois) Vanderpoorten, Hedenäs & Goffinet

Hygroamblystegium tenax (Hedwig) C. E. O. Jensen

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

[Synonyms for Hygroamblystegium tenax from earlier Wyoming checklist:]

Hygroamblystegium irriguum (Hook. & Wils. ex Wils.) Loeske

Hygroamblystegium orthocladum (P.-Beauv.) Loeske

 

(As Hygroamblystegium irrigum) Pole Creek, Albany County (Porter, 661), Porter, 1935. (As Hygroamblystegium irrigum (Wils.) Loeske) Albany Co., Porter, 1937. (As Hygroamblystegium orthocladon (P.B.) Grout).

 

Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935. Wyoming, Crum & Anderson p. 927.

 

LINCOLN CO.: 6700 ft., F.J. Hermann 25603 (RM).

 

There is a var. spinifolium (Schimp.) Jenn. in 1990 checklist (of Hygroamblystegium tenax).

 

Hygroamblystegium varium var. humile (P. Beauvois) Vanderpoorten & Hedenäs, J. Bryol. 31: 131. 2009   (Amblystegiaceae)  unillo

Hypnum humile P. Beauvois, Prodr. Aethéogam., 65. 1805

 

Leptodictyum humile (P. Beauvois) Ochyra (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Leptodictyum humile (P. Beauv.) Ochyra in earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Amblystegium trichopodium (Schultz) C.J. Hartm. var. trichopodium

Amblystegium trichopodium (Schultz) Hartm.

Amblystegium trichopodium var. curvipes (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Broth.

Amblystegium trichopodium var. kochii (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Lindb.

Leptodictyum trichopodium (Schultz) Warnst.

Leptodictyum trichopodium var. curvipes (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Broth.

Leptodictyum trichopodium var. kochii (B.S.G.) Broth. in E. & P.,

Leptodictyum trichopodium var. kochii (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Broth.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Leptodictyum trichopodium (Schultz) Warnst. var. kochii (B.S.G.) Broth.) Albany, Crook cos., Porter, 1935 & 1937. (As var. kochii) ALBANY CO.: Centennial Valley, Aven Nelson 2671 (RM).

 

(All as Leptodictyum humile) ALBANY CO.: northwest base of Sheep Mtn. along WY Rte. 11; ca. 4 miles due ESE of Centennial; ca. 7,700-7,800 ft., fen with low forest of Populus, Betula, Salix in shallow water, a “hanging bog” on steep hillside. In the bog. Reese 18177, June 7, 1993 (LAF) (thin network over putrid wood punk) det. Crum; ca. 4 air miles E-SE of Centennial, NW base of Sheep Mtn. along WY11, 7700-7900 ft. Populus, Betula, and Salix associated with spring seep; on log under shrubs, N.G. Miller 10,264 (NYS) June 7, 1993. CROOK CO.: Sundance Creek, Aven Nelson 2233 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, ss rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley. July 5, 1985. shaded sandstone rock, P. M. Eckel 9612521 (BUF) +Saionia uncinata, Brachythecium salebrosum, Eurhynchiastrum pulchellum, Platydictya jungermannioides.

 

(As Leptodictyum humile) Apparantly the difference between this species and Amblystegium  juratzkanum in forms of trichopodium where the costa goes only halfway up the leaf, the leaves are to 1 mm is in the character of the areolation. In A. trichopodium (now Leptodictyum, as one would guess) the leaf cells are longer, thinner walled and larger than the smaller, shorter, thicker- walled A. juratzkanum. There are specimens in which the leaves are identical except for the leaf cells. See the comparative areolations in Crum & Anderson in Amblystegium p. 943. Campylium hispidulum which is similar differs by the more conspicuous dentition, the channeled apex, the more abruptly acuminate condition from a broader base, the more slender apex sometimes short-filiform often reflexed or bent backward. Campylium chrysophyllum is strongly channeled in the apex and with more strongly falcate leaf tips again more abruptly acuminate. The costa is stronger, more than 1/2 the leaf length.

 

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Hygroamblystegium varium subsp. noterophilum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Vanderpoorten & Hedenäs, J. Bryol. 31: 130. 2009  (Amblystegiaceae) unillo

Hypnum noterophilum Sullivant & Lesquereux in A. Gray, Manual ed. 2, 678. 1856

 

Amblystegium fluviatile var. noterophilum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Flowers

Amblystegium  noterophilum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Holzinger

Hygroamblystegium noterophilum (Sullivant & Lesquereux) Warnstorf (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Hygroamblystegium noterophilum (Sulliv.) Warnst.) Albany Co., Porter, 1937. (As Hygroamblystegium noterophilum (Sull.) Warnst.) Laramie, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 9112), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO.: “Laramie,” A. Nelson 9112 (RM).

 

Mentioned by Crum & Anderson (1981) p. 924, where Wyoming is cited, and “Attached to calcareous rocks and usually submerged in shallow, running water, in springs or small streams, often in association with Fissidens grandifrons, at its best development in large, upwelling calcareous springs.”

 

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HYGROHYPNUM Lindberg, Contr. Fl. Crypt. As., 277. 1873  (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Limnobium Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 6: 65, plates 574–578. 1853, not Richard 1814 [Hydrocharitaceae]; Calliergon subg. Limnobium (Sullivant) Kindberg; Calliergon subg. Pseudolimnobium Kindberg; Calliergon sect. Molliformia Kindberg; Calliergon sect. Montaniformia Kindberg; Calliergon sect. Ochraceiforme Kindberg; Hygrohypnella Ignatov & Ignatova; Hypnum subg. Limnobium Sullivant; Ochyraea ňa; Pseudohygrohypnum Kanda

 

HYGROHYPNUM

Note confusion with Drepanocladus: look for variable costa in Hygrohypnum: double in Hygrohypnum ochraceum with large inflated auricles and cortical cells coming off from the stem.

 

H. bestii: leaves to 2+mm: orbicular [probably robust H. molle.

 

H. molle: leaves orbicular to longer than broad, between 1.2 and 1.5 mm, not secund, falcate (erect), serrulate in general at the tips.

 

H. luridum: really has no serrations, is falcate or secund, costa reaches nearly to the apex, on occasion, all leaf apices entire, sort of, upper leaf subtubulose, broadly channeled. Crum & Anderson p.981 emphasize that the costa is weak and doesn't make it midway.

 

H. ochraceum: longer than broad, inflated cells at basal angles and in a cylinder around the stem.

 

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Hygrohypnum bestii (Renauld & Bryhn) Holzinger, Bryologist 4: 12. 1901  (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum molle subsp. bestii Renauld & Bryhn, Bull. Acad. Int. Géogr. Bot. 10: 7. 1901

 

Hygrohypnella bestii (Renauld & Bryhn) Ignatov & Ignatova

Hygrohypnum bestii (Renauld & Bryhn) Brotherus

Hygrohypnum  molle var. bestii (Renauld & Bryhn) Habeeb

Limnobium bestii (Renauld & Bryhn) Holzinger

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

FREMONT CO.: Dubois, westward near Tworoger Pass, 9000 ft. On ground. T. C. Frye, June 22, 1931 (WTU) [This specimen has leaves to 2+mm]; also second specimen [WTU] same locale, etc. PARK CO.: rd. from Bear tooth Lodge to Red Lodge, e. of Summit at 10,500 ft. near small glacial lake, Lawton 1972 (WTU) [leaves to 2mm]; [says Montana, Park Co.] Falls Creek near Silver Gate, Lawton 2118 (WTU); northwest side of Bear Tooth Lake, Lawton 2079 (WTU) [leaves to 2mm]. TETON CO.: Teton National Park, Cascade Trail, Lawton, Aug. 14, 1953 1769 (WTU) [leaves to 2 mm]. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Mt. Washburn, Frye, Aug. 16, 1925; Black Sand Basin, Lawton 1871 [WTU] [Aug. 18, 1953], with Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Calliergonella cuspidata.

 

These are only identified because some stem tips support leaves to 2 mm, but none of them by much more. V. Crum & Anderson p. 989. Jamieson considered this a western species with some eastern disjuncts. Accepted in new N. Am. checklist.

 

Hygrohypnum bestii is much confused in North America with H. duriusculum and H. molle; plants are readily distinguished by their diagnostically long marginal laminal cells, to 90 \um or longer” (Jamieson in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Hygrohypnum dilatatum (Wils.) Loeske = Hygrohypnum molle (Hedw.) Loeske

 

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Hygrohypnum duriusculum (De Notaris) D. W. Jamieson, Taxon 29: 152. 1980 (Amblystegiaceae)

Limnobium duriusculum De Notaris in F. Ardissone et al., Erb. Crittog. Ital., ser. 2: no. 204. 1869

 

Calliergon circulifolium (Müller Hal. & Kindberg) Kindberg

Calliergon dilatatum (Wilson) Kindberg

Calliergon pseudoarcticum (Kindberg) Kindberg

Hygrohypnella duriuscula (De Notaris) Ignatov & Ignatova

Hygrohypnum dilatatum (Wilson) Loeske

Hygrohypnum eugyrium var. dilatatum (Wilson) Grout

Hypnum circulifolium Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Hypnum dilatatum Wilson

Hypnum pseudoarcticum Kindberg

Limnobium pseudoarcticum (Kindberg) Kindberg

Ochyraea duriuscula (De Notaris) Ignatov & Ignatova (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Hygrohypnum duriusculum (De Not.) Jamieson) SUBLETTE CO.: 10,324 ft., H. Rolston 85106 (CSU).

 

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Hygrohypnum luridum (Hedwig) Jennings, Man. Mosses W. Pennsylvania, 287. 1913 (Amblystegiaceae) unillo

Hypnum luridum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 291. 1801

 

Calliergon pseudomontanum (Kindberg) Kindberg

Hygrohypnum palustre (Hedwig) Loeske

Hygrohypnum palustre var. julaceum (Schleicher ex Bruch & Schimper) Loeske

Hygrohypnum palustre var. subsphaericarpon (Schleicher ex Bridel) Loeske

Hygrohypnum pseudomontanum (Kindberg) Grout

Hypnum columbicopalustre Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Hypnum palustre Hudson ex Bridel

Hypnum pseudomontanum Kindberg

Hypnum subeugyrium var. occidentale Cardot & Thériot

Limnobium pseudomontanum (Kindberg) Kindberg Scleropodium krausei (Müller Hal.) Macoun & Kindberg (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Hygrohypnum palustre Loeske, , nom. illeg.

 

(As Hygrohypnum palustre (Huds.) Loeske. Battle Lake, Carbon County (Aven Nelson, 4202, in part); Elk Mountain, Carbon County (Goodding, 548), Porter, 1935. (As Hygrohypnum palustre Loeske.) Carbon Co., Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mtns., Medicine Bow Natl. Forest, Barber Lake Picnic Area, 2.5 air miles NW of Centennial, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, 2660 msm, Buck 23199 (NY); Centennial Hills, Aven Nelson 2704, Aug. 20, 1896 (id'd as Hypnum arcticum - see note at H. smithii below). CARBON CO.: Medicine Bow Range on the Sand Lake road at Trail Creek, 9,2000 ft. Spruce-Fir zone. Submerged in stream, C. L. Porter 9695 (RM) Aug. 11, 1964. LINCOLN CO., 6600 ft., stones, partially submerged, F.J. Hermann 25592 (RM). NATRONA CO.: Hat Six Falls, Elias Nelson 5038 (RM) Aug. 7, 1898. SUBLETTE CO., 7950 ft., moist boulder, F.J. Hermann 25338 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, wet creek-boulder, c.fr. (Aug.6), F.J. Hermann 25769 (RM).

 

The plants (Buck) do indeed manage to not be denticulate in the apex, as in H. molle and H. bestii. The plants are “lurid”, a sordid dark green to yellow with brown tones overall. Shining. The leaf shape is distinctive: short rice-shaped; boat or spoon shaped (concave), rather than orbiculate as in H. molle and H. bestii. Broadest across the middle.

 

“Hygrohypnum luridum is the only calcicole in the genus; it occurs on calcareous rock or on other substrates irrigated with calcareous water” (Jamieson in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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Hygrohypnum molle (Hedwig) Loeske, Moosfl. Harz., 320. 1903  (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum molle Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 273, plate 70, figs. 7–10. 1801

 

Calliergon molle (Hedwig) Kindberg

Calliergon submolle (Kindberg) Kindberg

Limnobium submolle Kindberg

Ochyraea mollis (Hedwig) Ignatov (all from FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(From previous Wyoming checklist:)

Hygrohypnum dilatatum (Wils.) Loeske

Hygrohypnum smithii var. goulardii (Schimp.) Wijk & Marg.

 

Not reported from Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Hygrohypnum dilatatum (Wils.) Loeske) Crum & Anderson p. 989 perhaps hint that Hygrohypnum bestii, dilatatum and molle are the same species. The H. dilatatum is from Lawton reference). Carbon County and Johnson County, Porter, 1935. Carbon, Fremont, Johnson, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.: University Laboratory near Centennial, Lawton, 1657 (WTU) [leaves to 1.5 mm]. (As H. dilatatum) CARBON CO.: moist soil on rocks, 10,000 ft., Hermann 17148 (RM). (As H. dilatatum), PARK CO.: Beartooth Plateau, snowbeds, 3200 msm, Weber B-44313 (RM, COLO). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: near mouth of Yellowstone Lake, Frye, June 21, 1931 (WTU) [leaves to 1 mm].

 

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Hygrohypnum ochraceum (Turner ex Wilson) Loeske, Moosfl. Harz., 321. 1903 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum ochraceum Turner ex Wilson, Bryol. Brit., 400, plate 58 [lower right].

 

Calliergon ochraceum (Turner ex Wilson) Kindberg

Hygrohypnella ochracea (Turner ex Wilson) Ignatov & Ignatova

Hygrohypnum ochraceum var. filiforme (Limpricht) J. J. Amann

Hygrohypnum ochraceum var. flaccidum (Milde) J. J. Amann

Hygrohypnum ochraceum var. uncinatum (Milde) Loeske

(all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

(As Hypnum ochraceum) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1568-69, 1572a) (Roell 1893).

Pole Mt., Albany County (Porter, 1418); Canyon, Yellowstone National Park (Smiley), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985. CARBON CO.: T.C. Frye June 25, 1931 (RM); wet rocks on edge of stream above Lake Marie, 10,000 ft., Snowy Range, Medicine Bow Mts., ca. 13 miles E of Ryan Park, F.J. Hermann 17149 (RM), Aug. 19, 1961. CARBON CO.: 8600 ft., creek bank, F.J. Hermann 26714 (RM). FREMONT CO., 8600 ft., partially wooded slope, F. H. Hermann 25306 (RM); westward from Dubois, Tworoger Pass, alt. about 9000 ft. Coll. T. C. Frye, June 22, 1931 (BUF). SUBLETTE CO.: 10,324 ft., Holmes Rolston III 85136 (CSU); 10,500 ft., H. Rolston, III 85116 (CSU); 10,595 ft., Holmes Rolson III 85107 (CS); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake. Richard Andrus 7792a (BING). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: T.C. Frye, July 7, 1934 (RM).

 

Hygohypnum ochraceum f. flaccidum (Milde) Moenk. on a Hermann packet.

 

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Hygrohypnum smithii (Swartz) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 231[I,3]: 1039. 1908 (Amblystegiaceae)

Leskea smithii Swartz in S. Liljeblad, Utkast Sv. Fl. ed. 3, 549. 1816

 

Calliergon arcticum (Sommerfelt) Kindberg

Hypnum torrentis Müller Hal. & Kindberg

Ochyraea smithii (Swartz) Ignatov & Ignatova (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Centennial, Albany County (Aven Nelson, 2704). “This was published as Hypnum arcticum in the report by Dr. Nelson (1900),” Porter, 1935. Albany Co., Porter, 1937. [I have redetermined that specimen as H. luridum]

 

SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 16/viii/1989 South fork Baldy Creek headwaters, 10,240 ft. elev. 42°59'N, 109°34'W. On rocks along stream. Richard Andrus 7843 (BING).

 

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Hygrohypnum styriacum (Limpricht) Brotherus in H. G. A. Engler and K. Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 231[I,3]: 1039. 1908 (Amblystegiaceae)

Hypnum styriacum Limpricht, Flora 65: 201. 1882

 

Eurhynchium styriacum (Limpricht) Kindberg

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

PARK CO.: SNF, Beartooth Plateau: Beartooth Creek, granite debris along the creek; attached to boulders periodically wet by spray and seasonally covered with fast flowing water, assoc. with Scouleria aquatica, T57N R105W S7, 44*36.270-280 N,

109* 36.010-020’W, elev. ca. 8,900 ft (2700 m), 23 Aug 2009, Kosovich-Anderson 5431 (COLO); also Beartooth Lake, W and SW shore, Picea engelmannii forest along the shore, on wet clay, assoc.: Sanionia uncinata, Calliergonella cuspidata, T57N R105W S6&7, 44*56.500-520’N, 109*35.980-990’W, elev. ca. 8,900 ft (2700 m), 24 Jul 2010 Kosovich-Anderson 6652 [no herb. cited] (cited in Kosoviich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

Hygrohypnum smithii var. goulardii (Schimp.) Wijk & Marg. = Hygrohypnum molle (Hedw.) Loeske

 

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HYLOCOMIUM Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 169, plates 487–493. 1852  (Hylocomiaceae)

 

Hylocomium splendens (Hedwig) Schimper in P. Bruch and W. P. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 5: 173. 1852

Hypnum splendens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 262, plate 67, figs. 6–9. 1801    (Hylocomiaceae)

 

Hypnum splendens Hedw.

Hylocomium alaskanum (Lesquereux & James) Austin

Hylocomium proliferum (Bridel) Lindberg

Hylocomium splendens var. alaskanum (Lesquereux & James) Limpricht

Hylocomium splendens var. compactum (Lesquereux & James) Macoun & Kindberg

Hylocomium splendens subsp. giganteum Vitt

Hylocomium splendens var. obtusifolium (Geheeb) Paris

 

(Synonymy from previous Wyoming checklist:)

Hylocomium proliferum (Brid.) Lindb.

Hypnum proliferum Brid.

Hypnum splendens Hedw.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

In Park Co. Hylocomium splendens forms a rich bryophyte community combined with Aulacomnium palustre, Climacium dendroides, Helodium blandowii, Rhizomnium spp., Thuidium recognitum, Marchantia alpestris, [Thuidium recognitum, q.v.] and others “ (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

(As Hylocomium proliferum (L.) Lindb.) Sheridan County and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Johnson, Sheridan cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

 

SHERIDAN CO.: Wolf Creek Canyon, Aven Nelson no 2306 (RM).

 

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HYMENOSTYLIUM Bridel, Bryol. Univ. 2: 81. 1827  (Pottiaceae)

 

Hymenostylium recurvirostrum (Hedwig) Dixon, Rev. Bryol. Lichénol., n. s. 6: 96. 1934

Gymnostomum recurvirostrum Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 33.   1801  var. recurvirostrum (Pottiaceae)

 

Barbula curvirostris f. scabra Lindb.

Gymnostomum recurvirostre Hedw.

Gymnostomum recurvirostre var. scabrum (Lindb.) Grout

Hymenostylium recurvirostre (Hedw.) Dix.

Weisia curvirostris (Hedw.) C. Muell.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 27, 2007).

 

British Columbia, Washington, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming; Alaska, Nevada, Utah; South Dakota, Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ontario; New England, New York, Virginia, North Carolina. (As G. curvirostra (Ehrh.) Hedw.) Point of Rocks, Sweetwater Co. (Aven Nelson, 8144); South Butte, Sweetwater Co. (Aven Nelson, 3549), Porter, 1935.

 

ALBANY CO: Medicine Bow Mts., east of Snowy Range Pass, Aug. 10, 1953, E. Lawton, 1663 ((WTU). JOHNSON CO.: 6600ft, B.E.Nelson 6836a (RM). NATRONA CO.: Hat Six Falls, S. E. of Casper, Elias Nelson 5036 (RM), Aug. 7, 1897, with Pseudoleskeella tectorum. PARK CO.: 8600-9000 feet, 13131 (RM, BUF). SWEETWATER CO.: Aven Nelson 3549 (RM); on the abrupt face of cliff wet with sulphur water, Point of Rocks, Aven Nelson 8144 (COLO, WTU).

 

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HYPNUM Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 236, plate 59, figs. 8, 9; plates 60–77. 1801, name conserved  (Hypnaceae)

Breidleria Loeske; Drepanium C. E. O. Jensen; Pseudostereodon (Brotherus) M. Fleischer; Stereodon (Bridel) Mitten

 

HYPNUM

Note that if you have an apparent Hypnum that has erect capsules, erect or straight leaves and is otherwise Hypnum-like, even to the little quadrate cells in the leaf angles, you have probably got Pylaisiella, probably P. polyantha. Pylaisiella species are AUTOICOUS, too.

 

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Hypnum callichroum Funck. ex Brid. Evanston, Uinta County (Aven Nelson, 4128, in part [see H. lindbergii]. “The identity of this plant is doubtful,” Porter, 1935. Uinta Co., Porter, 1937. Excluded.

 

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Hypnum cupressiforme Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 291. 1801  (Hypnaceae) unillo

 

Hypnum vaucheri Lesq. (see discussion Crum & Anderson p. 1158-9.)

Stereodon cupressiformis (Hedwig) Mitten  (FNA Vol. 28, 2014),

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014), neither the var. cupressiforme nor its other varieties..

 

Albany County (Porter, 668 & 1279), Porter, 1935. (As Hypnum vaucheri Lesq.) Lawton. Albany Co., Porter, 1937. “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: limestone rock, deep crack, Vukelich Mar. 19, 1988 (BUF); Laramie Mtns., Roger Canyon, ca. 8 air miles NE of Laramie, Co. Rd. 17, limestone outcrops with Cercocarpus montanus, Buck 23164 (NY) [this may be H. vaucheri, see Reese specimen below). SHERIDAN CO.: limestone boulder in spruce/fir forest, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-F4 (RM) c. fr. June 19, 1992, with Dicranoweisia crispula, Tortella tortuosa, Tortula norvegica.

 

There are vars. filiforme Brid., var. julaceum Brid., var. lacunosum Brid., var. resupinatum (Tayl.) Schimp. in Spruce and var. subjulaceum Mol. in 1990 checklist.

 

(As var. resupinatum (Tayl.) Schimp., a variety not mentioned by Schofield (FNA Vol. 28, 2014):

 

Hawk's Ranch, Colorado-Wyoming State line, Albany County (L.O. Williams, 98), Porter, 1935. Albany Co., Porter, 1937.

 

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Hypnum lindbergii Mitten, J. Bot. 2: 123. 1864   (Hypnaceae)

Hypnum arcuatum Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 18: 371. 1862, not Hedwig 1801 

 

Calliergonella lindbergii (Mitten) Hedenäs

Hypnum arcuatum var. americanum Renauld & Cardot

Hypnum arcuatiforme Kindberg

Hypnum renauldii Kindberg

Stereodon patientiae Lindberg (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Hypnum arcuatum Lindb.) Albany County (Porter, 770, 780, 1443; and Aven Nelson, 8813), Porter, 1935. (As Hypnum arcuatum Lindb.) Albany Co., Porter, 1937. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: 11000 ft., F.J. Hermann 23430 (RM). SUBLETTE CO.: Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 2. 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. Mineralized seeps at south end of lake with Campyllium stellatum. Richard Andrus 7801b (BING). UINTA CO.: Evanston, Aven Nelson 4128 (RM) July 27, 1897 [cortical cells inflated, apex of leaves only acuminate, not filiform, falcate not circinate, inflated alar cells not rounded to insertion.]

 

May be confused with Hygrohypnum ochraceum, which has “less crowded leaves with acumina twisted and flexuose and much stronger costa” (Crum & Anderson p. 1173 (see discussion at Drepanocladus). For H. lindbergii cells across the insertion may be a nice orange color that may also affect the alar cells (which may appear thickened), which are usually hyaline, inflated.

 

In Colorado (as Calliergonella lindbergii), the species is described as common “in willow carrs and along snow-melt streamlets in the subalpine” (Webber & Wittmann 2007).  The leaves are strongly falcate, not complanate and the alar cells are in a clearly inflated group.

 

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\GP\2AcrossActual\HypnHypnumLindbergii_Art_Web.gif

 

 

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Hypnum pallescens (Hedwig) P. Beauvois, Prodr. Aethéogam., 67. 1805  (Hypnaceae) unillo

Leskea pallescens Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 219, plate 55, figs. 1–6. 1801    

 

Hypnum depressulum Müller Hal.

Hypnum pallescens var. protuberans (Bridel) Lesquereux & James

Hypnum reptile Michaux

Stereodon pallescens (Hedwig) Mitten

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Hypnum depressulum C. M.) Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5172; and Aven Nelson, 1924), Porter, 1935. Albany Co., Porter, 1935. (As H. reptile Michx.) Weston Co., Wynne 1943.

 

ALBANY CO: (As Hypnum pallescens (Hedw.) P. -Beauv.) La Plata Mines. Elias Nelson 5172 (RM) Aug. 25, 1898. Laramie Hills Aven Nelson 1924 (RM) June 13, 1896.

 

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Hypnum pratense Koch ex Spruce, London J. Bot. 4: 177. 1845  (Hypnaceae) unillo

 

Breidleria pratensis (Koch ex Spruce) Loeske

Hypnum pseudopratense Kindberg

Stereodon pratensis (Koch ex Spruce) Warnstorf (FNA Vol. 27 (2007)

 

Not yet reported for Wyoming (FNA vol. 28, 2014); note that the genus Breidleria, recognized by Weber and Wittmann in the Colorado flora, has been retained as Hypnum (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014).

 

SHERIDAN CO.: moist limestone, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-001 (BUF, RM), with Homalothecium pinnatifidum, Ditrichum capillaceum.

 

Easily confused with H. lindbergii with which it shares many characteristics, such as the hyalodermis of inflated cells around the periphery of the stem cross section [note stem central strand present in both species]. Hypnum lindbergii has a significant area of inflated, lax, hyaline cells in the alar region of the leaf in distinctive decurrencies. That is not to say Hypnum  pratense does not also have such inflated, lax and hyaline cells there, but they are less to insignificant or ambiguous, and usually mixed with the flaccid cells of the hyalodermis when stripped from the stem. The inflated cells may occur in only one or two to three rows. The leaves of H. pratense are not decurrent; the leaves are weakly falcate, whereas in H. lindbergii they are strongly so.

 

In Colorado, the species (as Breidleria pratensis) is described as having stems “dorsiventrally compressed, the leaves complanate, , in one plane and closely overlapping, not strongly falcate, slightly denticulate apically, the margins plane, alar cells not sharply delimited. It is inconspicuous and rarely collected, but expected to be frequent in willow carrs and wet tundra” (Webber & Wittmann 2007).

 

Hypnum revolutum (Mitten) Lindberg, Öfvers. Kongl. Vetensk.-Akad. Förh. 23: 542. 1867  (Hypnaceae)

Stereodon revolutus Mitten, J. Proc. Linn. Soc., Bot., suppl.: 97.

 

var. revolutum

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Hypnum heufleri Jur.) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park (1537-38, 1541, 1555) (Roell 1893).

“Very common.” Albany County, Carbon County, Sublette County, Teton County, and Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Albany, Carbon, Sublette, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. “Common in front of glaciers,” Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Spence, 1981. Teton Co., Spence 1985. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO. : 9800 ft., F.J. Hermann 23427 (RM); Hermann 17752 (RM); Medicine Bow Mtns., Barber Lake picnic area; 2.5 mi due NW of Centennial, 8,700 ft, Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, on boulder, W. D. Reese 18168 (LAF) June 7, 1993. BIG HORN CO.: just off US16 between TenSleep & Buffalo (near Sitting Bull Campsite). Pinus contorta v. latifolia being lumbered. Just N of Washakie Co. border. ca. 5000' Disturbed soil with Bryum lisae var. cuspidatum, Ceratodon purpureus, July 6, 1985 Eckel 94092203 (BUF). FREMONT CO.: 7800 ft., F.J. Hermann 25535 (RM); soil on rock, Douglas fir slope 1/2 mile E of Horse Creek Campground, 7800 ft. Absaroka Range, 11 miles N of Dubois, Hermann 25536 (RM), Aug. 28, 1973. PARK CO.: 6500 ft., F. J. Hermann 20040 (RM); thin soil over dry, shaded rock under open canopy of Douglas-fir, at base of Cathedral Cliff, 2 mi. E of Crandall Ranger Station, 6,600 ft. J. C. Elliott 1792 (BUF) Aug. 12, 1990. SHERIDAN CO.: limestone boulder in spruce/fir forest, Big Horn National Forest, T57N, R89W, Section 34, McKee 92-F1 (BUF, RM). SUBLETTE CO.: 7850 ft. F.J. Hermann 25318 (RM); Bridger Wilderness, Wind River Range 14/viii/1989 Barnes Lake, 9747 ft. elev., 42°57'30”N, 109°36'W. At base of trees by lake. Richard Andrus 7804 (BING); Bridger-Teton National Forest, 4.6 miles N of Bondurant on US 191 & 189. Wooded Spruce bank, ss rocks, lush herbage, N slope. Hoback River valley, shaded sandstone rock. July 5, 1985, P. M. Eckel 961259 (BUF, RM). TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25557 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK: Bartley, F. & L. Pontious 7 (RM).

 

“Since the leaves tend to be strongly channeled, it is often difficult to observe whether the margin is actually revolute. I have often had to prove the point with cross sections of the leaves” Flowers (p. 513). The Big Horn Co. specimen is golden-green to brown as the descriptions indicate, rather than all green, as H. pallescens is said to be.

 

The distribution of Hypnum revolutum var. ravaudii (Boulay) Ando is problematic as “The variety is troublesome to determine because of its lack of the characteristic revolute margins (except sometimes near the base), and the costa is difficult to discern.” (Schofield in FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

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Hypnum vaucheri Lesquereux, Mém. Soc. Sci. Nat. Neuchâtel 3(3): 48. 1846  (Hypnaceae) unillo

 

Hypnum complexum (Mitten) A. Jaeger & Sauerbeck

Hypnum subcomplexum Kindberg

Stereodon vaucheri (Lesquereux) Brotherus (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 20140

 

Above, this species is lumped with H. cupressiforme, but the specimen of Reese's is distinctive, especially when reading Smith & Flowers. Campbell Co., Medina, 1994.

 

ALBANY CO.: Medicine Bow Mtns., Barber Lake picnic area; ca. 2.5 mi. due NW of Centennial; ca. 8,700 ft., Pinus contorta forest along Libby Creek, on duff. Reese 18169 (LAF); Laramie Mtns, Roger Canyon, 8 air miles NE of Laramie City center. 7850-8000 ft. on soil, associated with limestone outcrop, N. G. Miller 10,239 (NYS) June 7, 1993.

 

Tiny plant, irregularly branched, SUB-JULACEOUS, especially when wetted. One thinks of H. revolutum, but the margins are not recurved except a little at the base - they are erect on a concave leaf to inward, making the leaf tubulose to a channeled apex. Flowers gives a strikingly good description of the Reese specimen. He says H. vaucheri “is one of the dominant mosses in localized parts of the Colorado-Green River Basin, where it grows on dry rocks and ledges, often on sandy soil sheltered by overhanging rocks, bases of trees, shrubs and bunchgrasses. Elsewhere in the state it is less frequent.” It is indeed, as he says, “brownish green and somewhat glossy when dry”, it is also notable for its large area of quadrate cells, in well defined groups about twice as long as wide, to 15 cells up the leaf margin. Although the Reese specimen shows mostly secund-falcate leaves, these are variable to straight. This variability is distinctive. Paraphyllia are foliose!

 

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IMBRIBRYUM N. Pedersen, Bryologist 108: 449. 2005  (Bryaceae)

 

[Imbribryum alpinum (Hudson ex Withering) N. Pedersen, Bryologist 108: 449. 2005  1801      (Bryaceae)

Bryum alpinum Hudson ex Withering, Syst. Arr. Brit. Pl. ed. 4, 3: 824. 1801     

 

Not reported for Wyoming; its western distribution is Alaska, California, and Colorado; the species requires taxonomic revision (Spence, FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As ? Bryum alpinum Huds. ex With. ):

Sheep Mountain, Albany Co. (Goodding, 2098), Porter, 1935.

 

(As  Bryum alpinum Huds. ex With. ):

In one specimen from Europe, the red-orange and green color is evident, like the pink-green of B. weigelii, it is not of the ruby red variety: resembles a Pohlia. basal cells seem thinner walled, more hyaline and in old or young leaves sort of auriculate. The leaf is bellied, concave, the margins broadly reflexed, and then tightly revolute on the extreme margins to below the apex. The costa is not or shortly percurrent and the apex broadly acute. Leaf cells are rectangular and broad. The lower stems are not covered with rhizoids such that they appear outside the leaves, so not “matted” but rather “clean-shaven”, actually, and long and fine. The stem from Colorado showed a clear “year” difference, or at least two distinct growing periods with two different sets of leaves, the first period the leaves are brick red like the stem and more lanceolate and narrowly acute with percurrent costae. The second growth is fair green, more ovate (broadest across the middle), more broadly acute and the costae subpercurrent. The leaf cells more linear- rhomboidal and the walls robust to thick, the cells at the base becoming “bubbly”, turgid and hyaline and thinner walled, quadrate, the central basal cells differentiated almost, conspicuously bigger below the belly of the leaf, rectangular than the upper median laminal cells (seen in older leaves). The belly of the leaf ends several cells below the apex of the leaf, leaving the apex flat. Bryum muelenbeckii [broader leaves with broader tips, less strongly revolute margins, and shorter, broader cells. p. 564 Leaves brownish-green or brownish IMBRICATE DRY, ERECT-SPREADING MOIST. Bryum miniatum, shiny-red, too; broadly oblong or oblong-ovate leaves with rounded-obtuse and often cucullate tips and plane margins sometimes slightly recurved in the alar region. Leaves entire. percurrency rare, obtuse or rounded at apex (Lawton). Strongly concave. Bryum alpinum: entire leaves or minutely denticulate in apex; margins recurved nearly to the apex: more often acute, occasionally only, obtuse, some leaves shortly EXCURRENT. Lawton LEAVES IMBRICATE WET OR DRY, SCARCELY CONTORTED WHEN DRY (CRUM).  Ptychostomum cyclophyllum, a reddish moss with small, obtuse leaves is distinctive by its contorted leaves when dry; care with B. gemmiparum, which is also scarcely contorted: it is said to not have reddish color except when old.

 

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Imbribryum gemmiparum (De Notaris) J. R. Spence, Phytologia 89: 112. 2007  (Bryaceae) unillo

Bryum gemmiparum De Notaris, Comment. Soc. Crittog. Ital. 2: 211. 1865    

 

Wyoming (FNA, Vol. 28, 2014)

 

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Imbribryum muehlenbeckii (Bruch & Schimper) N. Pedersen, Bryologist 108: 449. 2005 (Bryaceae) unillo

Bryum muehlenbeckii Bruch & Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 4: 163, plate 381. 1846    

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Bryum muehlenbeckii) Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, sterile (1513) (Roell 1893).

 

PARK CO.: SNF, Beartooth Plateau: SE shore of Island Lake, ecotone zone between willow wetlands and subalpine Picea engelmannii forest, on wet loamy soil, in shade, T57N R105W S3, 44*56.690-700’ N, 109*32.230-240’W, elev. ca. 9,500 ft (2900 m), 12 Aug 2008, Kosovich-Anderson 2371 (ASC, COLO, DUKE) “det. by J. Spence” (Kosovich-Anderson & Weber 2011).

 

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ISOPTERYGIOPSIS Z. Iwatsuki, J. Hattori Bot. Lab. 33: 379, fig. 21. 1970  (Hypnaceae)

 

Isopterygiopsis pulchella (Hedwig) Z. Iwatsuki, J. Hattori Bot. Lab. 63: 450. 1987 (Hypnaceae)

Leskea pulchella Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 220, plate 55, figs. 7–12.

 

Leskea pulchella Hedwig

Holmgrenia diminutiva Grout

Hypnum nitidulum Wahlenberg

Isopterygium pulchellum (Hedwig) A. Jaeger

Isopterygium pulchellum var. nitidulum (Wahlenberg) Roth

Orthothecium diminutivum (Grout) H. A. Crum, Steere & L. E. Anderson

Plagiothecium passaicense Austin

Plagiothecium pseudolatebricolum Kindberg

Plagiothecium pulchellum (Hedwig) Schimper (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(From earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Isopterygium nitidulum (Wahlenb.) Kindb.

Isopterygium nitidum Lindb.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5242 (RM), c.fr., Aug. 29, 1898 [orig. det. as Plagiothecium sullivantiae Sch. - specimen autoicous, stem cortical cells thick walled]

 

“Brooklyn Lake, Albany County (Elias Nelson, 5242)” Porter, 1935 - note that the label cited by Porter here does not bear the same data for Nelson 5242 as the specimen at RM. Plagiothecium roseanum, or Pl. cavifolium (Brid.) Iwats. is here excluded from Wyoming.

 

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JAFFUELIOBRYUM Thériot, Rev. Bryol., n. s. 1: 192, plate 8, figs. 1–5. 1928 (Grimmiaceae)

 

Jaffueliobryum wrightii (Sullivant) Thériot, Rev. Bryol., n. s. 1: 193. 1928 (Grimmiaceae)

Coscinodon wrightii Sullivant, Musc. Hepat. U.S., 132. 1856  

 

Coscinodon wrightii Sull. in Gray

Grimmia wrightii (Sull.) Aust.

 

LARAMIE CO.: Pine Bluffs Rest Area on the I-80, Pine Bluffs, from holes in boulders sitting on rest area lawn. Had been relocated from bluff. Assoc. Bouteloua graiclis and other prairie ssp (lawn grass) March 22, 1996, w. young, calyptrate fruit, Judy A. Hoy 314 (BUF).

 

Lawton suggests that Grimmia raui Aust. (Bull. Torrey Club 6: 46. 1875) “is described as having the leaves entire, but specimens determined as G. raui commonly have some of the upper leaves minutely denticulate at the apex. it is questionable whether G. raui should be maintained as a distinct species,” p. 123. (As G. raui Aust) Carbon Co. “Rawlins, July 13, l942, Degener & Peiler 16968” Wynne 1943. “Rare in the Pacific Northwest” Lawton.

 

Both species (including Jaffueliobryum raui (Austin) Thériot) will prove to occur in Wyoming, so the following key is included (Spence in FNA Vol. 27, 2007):

 

Distal lamina acute to acuminate, leaves distinctly keeled, proximal stem leaves mostly spreading (Jaffueliobryum raui)

 

Distal lamina broadly acute-rounded, leaves not keeled, proximal stem leaves mostly appressed (Jaffueliobryum wrightii).

 

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KINDBERGIA Ochyra, Lindbergia 8: 53. 1982 (Brachytheciaceae)

Eurhynchium subg. Stokesiella Kindberg, Eur. N. Amer. Bryin. 1: 93. 1897, not Stokesiella Lemmermann 1908 [Chrysophyta]

 

Kindbergia oregana (Sullivant) Ochyra, Lindbergia 8: 54. 1982   (Brachytheciaceae)

Hypnum oreganum Sullivant, Mem. Amer. Acad. Arts, n. s. 4: 172. 1849    

 

Eurhynchium oreganum (Sull.) Jaeg.

Stokesiella oregana (Sull.) Robins.

 

Not reported for Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

(As Eurhynchium oreganum)  Teton Co., Spence, 1985.

 

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LEPTOBRYUM (Schimper) Wilson, Bryol. Brit., 219. 1855  (Meesiaceae)

Bryum subg. Leptobryum Schimper in P. Bruch and P. W. Schimper, Bryol. Europ. 4: 1. 1851

 

Leptobryum pyriforme (Hedwig) Wilson, Bryol. Brit., 219. 1855   (Meesiaceae)

Webera pyriformis Hedwig, Sp. Musc. Frond., 169. 1801  

 

Webera pyriformis Hedw.

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014).

 

Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, c. fr. (1520) (Roell 1893).

Cosmopolitan and common. “Common throughout most of the the State. Albany, Carbon, Fremont, [Sheridan], Sublette, Teton cos., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1935. Teton Co., Spence 1985.

 

ALBANY CO.: 7800 ft., F.J. Hermann 25930 (RM); NW base of Sheep Mtn., seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix dominant, Buck 23223 (NY) c.fr. young, some undeveloped, June 7, 1993; La Plata Mines, Elias Nelson 5176 (RM), c.fr. Aug. 25, 1898, in Mnium marginatum (packet), with Bryum turbinatum. BIGHORN CO.: Big Horn Mtns. on rotten logs, 8300 ft., Nelson 3658, c. fr. July 13, 1979, with Distichium, Bryum (RM). CARBON CO.: Haggarty Creek, Sierra Madre Mtns. 8440' elev., moist soil by creek, Nancy Kastning-Culp 3032, c.fr. (BUF). FREMONT CO.: 8400 ft., F.J. Hermann 25516 (RM). JOHNSON CO., 6600ft., B.E.Nelson 6836b (RM). PARK CO.: 9500 ft., F.J. Hermann 20069 (RM). SWEETWATER CO: , ca. 6,400,' on US (187)191, at 14-Mile Res-ervoir picnic area, US Dept Interior. Moist soils in shade above brooklet, with Hennediella heimii, Campylium chrysophyllum July 5, l985, Eckel 120186 (BUF, RH). TETON CO.: 7000 ft., F.J. Hermann 25567 (RM). YELLOWSTONE NTNL. PK., 8000 ft. F.J. Hermann 20024 (RM); A. Nelson 7804 (RM).

 

NOTE: may be confused with another genus with long, setaceous leaves: Distichium, which has leaves coming off the stem alternately left and right, presenting a flattened face on the stem, whereas Leptobryum is whorled and the stem and leaves together are cylindrical overall. The capsules of Distichium are cylindric and erect to slighly inclined from the vertical, whereas Leptobryum has its distinct obpyriform, upside-down pear shaped, highly glossy capsules.

 

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Leptodictyum humile (P. Beauv.) Ochyra = Hygroamblystegium varium var. humile (P. Beauvois) Vanderpoorten & Hedenäs

 

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LEPTODICTYUM (Schimper) Warnstorf, Krypt.-Fl. Brandenburg 2: 867. 1906  (Amblystegiaceae)

Amblystegium subg. Leptodictyum Schimper, Syn. Musc. Eur., 595. 1860

 

Leptodictyum riparium (Hedw.) Warnst. (Amblystegiaceae)

 

Hypnum riparium Hedwig

Amblystegium brevipes Cardot & Thériot

Amblystegium riparium (Hedwig) Schimper

Amblystegium riparium var. flaccidum (Lesquereux & James) Renauld & Cardot

Amblystegium riparium var. fluitans (Lesquereux & James) Renauld & Cardot

Amblystegium riparium var. longifolium (Schultz) Schimper

Brachythecium pennellii E. B. Bartram

Campylium polygamum var. longinerve (Renauld & Cardot) Grout

Leptodictyum brevipes (Cardot & Thériot) Brotherus Leptodictyum laxirete (Cardot & Thériot) Brotherus Leptodictyum riparium var. abbreviatum (Schimper) Grout Leptodictyum riparium var. brachyphyllum (Cardot & Thériot) Grout

Leptodictyum riparium var. elongatum (Schimper) Warnstorf

Leptodictyum riparium var. flaccidum (Lesquereux & James) Grout

Leptodictyum sipho (P. Beauvois) Brotherus

Leptodictyum vacillans (Sullivant) Brotherus

Rhynchostegiella georgiana Dixon & Grout (all FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(Synonymy for Leptodictyum riparium from earlier Wyoming checklist:)

Amblystegium riparium (Hedw.) Schimp. in B.S.G.

Amblystegium riparium fo. fluitans (Lesq. & James) Flow.

Amblystegium riparium var. abbreviatum Schimp. in B.S.G.

Amblystegium riparium var. flaccidum (Lesq. & James) Ren. & Card.

Amblystegium riparium var. fluitans (Lesq. & James) Ren. & Card.

Leptodictyum riparium (Hedw.) Warnst.

Leptodictyum riparium var. brachyphyllum (Card. & Thér.) Grout

Leptodictyum riparium var. elongatum (Schimp. in B.S.G.) Warnst.

Leptodictyum riparium var. flaccidum (Lesq. & James) Grout

Leptodictyum riparium var. longifolium (Schultz) Warnst.

Leptodictyum riparium var. nigrescens Wynne in E. Whiteh.

Leptodictyum riparium var. obtusum (Grout) Grout

Leptodictyum sipho (P. Beauv.) Broth

 

Wyoming (FNA Vol. 28, 2014)

 

(As Leptodictyum riparium) Albany Co., Yellowstone National Park, Porter, 1937.

 

ALBANY CO.: NW base of Sheep Mtn. along WY 11, ca. 4 air miles ESE of Centennial, seep area (calcareous fen) with Populus, Betula and Salix, Buck 23235 (NY). TETON CO.: (var. longifolium (Schultz.) Moenk.) 6.700 ft., boggy area, Lichvar 704 (RM). The overall delicacy of this species is what makes it distinctive from other species in the genus. The costa is thinner than the others, except perhaps A. serpens, than which this plant is usually bigger. In the Buck specimen, the plants have similar shape to A. serpens but are larger, larger cells, more delicate so more delicate in color (pale green). The apex was acuminate, the leaf broad at the base.

 

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Lescuraea radicosa (Mitt.) Moenk. = Pseudoleskea radicosa (Mitt.) Mac. & Kindb.

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Limprichtia revolvens (Sw.) Loeske =  Scorpidium revolvens (Swartz) Rubers