Correspondence of Charles Mohr and G. W. Clinton
Edited by P. M. Eckel
Res Botanica
Missouri Botanical Garden
July 22, 2003
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The Correspondence of

Charles (Carl) Theodore Mohr (1824‑1901) and

George William Clinton (1807‑1885)

 

1877

 


 

Vol. 11 no. 192 [J 59]

Mobile, May 7th, 1877 My dear friend!

 

I have the pleasure to send you and your esteemed Lady a sample of fruit raised in my garden. ‑ I hope it will arrive in good condition and be so acceptable as a dessert fruit as it [is] to us when fresh plucked from the tree. ‑ It is to us delicious, and perfectly healthy all members of the household indulge in it [after?] at libitum. ‑ It comes from a beautiful most ornamental evergreen the Eriobothrya japonica or Japanese plum tree; If any of your friends wish to raise plants for the green house, please give them the seeds; it is perfectly hardy with us and was not injured by the severe last [sic] winter; it blooms in October to November. The thyrsi of flowers filling the air with fragrance. With my best regards to Mrs. Clinton I remain very truly yours

 

Chas. Mohr  over

[Clinton's handwriting] Eriobotrya Lindl. is reduced to Photinia, by Bentham & Hooker. [no note of receipt]

 

1877.

‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑Vol. 11 no. 192 [J 59]

Mobile, May 7th, 1877 My dear friend!

I have the pleasure to send you and your esteemed Lady a sample of

fruit raised in my garden. ‑ I hope it will arrive in good condition and be so acceptable as a dessert fruit as it [is] to us when fresh plucked from the tree. ‑ It is to us delicious, and perfectly healthy all members of the household indulge in it [after?] at libitum. ‑ It comes from a beautiful most ornamental evergreen the Eriobothrya japonica or Japanese plum tree; If any of your friends wish to raise plants for the green house, please give them the seeds; it is perfectly hardy with us and was not injured by the severe last [sic] winter; it blooms in October to November. The thyrsi of flowers filling the air with fragrance. With my best regards to Mrs. Clinton I remain very truly yours

Chas. Mohr  over [Clinton's handwriting] Eriobotrya Lindl. is reduced to Photinia, by Bentham & Hooker. [no note of receipt]

‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑

‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑Vol. 11 no. 220 [J 28 & 27 ‑ two sheets of paper]

Mobile, Septbr. 29th, 1877 My dear friend!

After my return home from a trip through the region of the metamorphic rocks of this state I found your kind lines and the package of plants. Judging from the date they must have arrived a few days after I had left

home. I returned on the 7th inst. ‑ Since the three weeks that have elapsed by, I was detained every day to very late hours in my store; so that I had to deprive myself of the pleasure to look over the plants until the evening before last. I scarcely know how to thank for the great pleasure you everlasting kindness has afforded me again. Amongst the California and other western plants are many which I prize highly, as setting to rest many a doubt about specimens I had before from those regions. ‑ I was called quite unexpected upon a tour of investigation through the eastern part of our state extending to the N.W. Cor. of Cleburne County, through the beautiful and intresting mountain districts of the Hill[abee?] and Bluemountain ranges. A series of analyses of gold ores from these regions, made by me last winter prompted some parties to induce me to explore the mining intrests there, which in former time 30 ‑ 35 years ago, had attracted a good deal of attention. After seemingly utterly forgotten, the intrest in these old mines has been lately, slightly revived. I have handed in a preliminary report, of my field work, my analytical work will for some months to come engage my time; I made a fine collection geognostic as well as mineralogical of the country traversed; and have given as much attention as was possible under the circumstances to Botany. I started well provided with the accoutrements of a botanist, but too soon I found out that I had to leave them behind me; travelling on horseback, loaded down with my

hammers, specimens of rocks, etc., often forced to hurry over large

distances to reach certain points of special practical intrest, and pushing often my way way [sic] on foot miles through mountain recesses and wildwood impassable on horseback; I had to give up the idea to make larger collections when on the wing. I had to pass many an intresting plant, and of others I could bring home only smal bits [sic], just enough for identification of the species. Still I have made notes allmost every day marking the changes in the flora from the coast to an altitude of about 1200 ft. The season was anyhow unfavorable to botanical aims; the severe drought lasting from May by unprecedented hot weather; had parched up the open hill sides and mountain ridges. I travelled often days seeing but very few flowers. The constant exercise in the fresh mountian air, combined with an occupation that kept from morning until night all my faculties employed to their stretch by an all absorbing intrest [sic], had most wonderful effect upon my whole being. I

[second page] stood the hardships of the day as well as in my younger days, when wandering through the mountain regions of my native home a young enthusiastic student of nature; All the pains and depressing influences engrafted upon me by a life of constant confinement, had passed away like the clouds upon the sky under the benign influences of the sun, and I am thankful to say I have spent a series of truly happy days. It just happened that I could get away with out detriment to my business intrests,

finding myself materially recompensed for the time I had to spend in the prosecution of the task entrusted to me. ‑

I hope that with the arrival of the cooler season your strength has returned; and that you find yourself by this time in the enjoyment of good health.

Please tender to your esteemed Lady my best thanks for kindly remembring me; At this moment the recollection of the happy hours passes through my mind, which I was favored to spend with you now just one year ago. I hope that I shall be able to send you some objects of intrest I brought home with me; Will a few specimens of Korundum from this state be acceptable to the Cabinet of your society?

I remain very truly

yours

Carl Mohr To Hon. Judge G. W. Clinton!

 

[no note of receipt.

Cleburne Co. is on the eastern border of Alabama state due west of Atlanta, Georgia. It is crossed by the Tallapoosa River. This description of his experiences in the gold prospecting area must have brought back reminiscences of his earlier gold mining experience in 1849. It seems at

first curious how many botanists also had experience in geology and mining: John Torrey in New York was chief assayer in the United States assay office in New York City and Leo Lesquereux also did geological work. A background in chemistry, such as one made in the course of the study of medicine and pharmacy would come in handy here, and the study of botany, in its medicinal aspects, would reinforce such expertise in the healing

professions.]

 

‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑

 

Vol. 11 no. 220 [J 28 & 27 ‑ two sheets of paper]

Mobile, Septbr. 29th, 1877 My dear friend!

 

After my return home from a trip through the region of the metamorphic rocks of this state I found your kind lines and the package of plants. Judging from the date they must have arrived a few days after I had left home. I returned on the 7th inst. ‑ Since the three weeks that have elapsed by, I was detained every day to very late hours in my store; so that I had to deprive myself of the pleasure to look over the plants until the evening before last. I scarcely know how to thank for the great pleasure you everlasting kindness has afforded me again. Amongst the California and other western plants are many which I prize highly, as setting to rest many a doubt about specimens I had before from those regions. ‑ I was called quite unexpected upon a tour of investigation through the eastern part of our state extending to the N.W. Cor. of Cleburne County, through the beautiful and intresting mountain districts of the Hill[abee?] and Bluemountain ranges. A series of analyses of gold ores from these regions, made by me last winter prompted some parties to induce me to explore the mining intrests there, which in former time 30 ‑ 35 years ago, had attracted a good deal of attention. After seemingly utterly forgotten, the intrest in these old mines has been lately, slightly revived. I have handed in a preliminary report, of my field work, my analytical work will for some months to come engage my time; I made a fine collection geognostic as well as mineralogical of the country traversed; and have given as much attention as was possible under the circumstances to Botany. I started well provided with the accoutrements of a botanist, but too soon I found out that I had to leave them behind me; travelling on horseback, loaded down with my hammers, specimens of rocks, etc., often forced to hurry over large distances to reach certain points of special practical intrest, and pushing often my way way [sic] on foot miles through mountain recesses and wildwood impassable on horseback; I had to give up the idea to make larger collections when on the wing. I had to pass many an intresting plant, and of others I could bring home only smal bits [sic], just enough for identification of the species. Still I have made notes allmost every day marking the changes in the flora from the coast to an altitude of about 1200 ft. The season was anyhow unfavorable to botanical aims; the severe drought lasting from May by unprecedented hot weather; had parched up the open hill sides and mountain ridges. I travelled often days seeing but very few flowers. The constant exercise in the fresh mountian air, combined with an occupation that kept from morning until night all my faculties employed to their stretch by an all absorbing intrest [sic], had most wonderful effect upon my whole being. I

 

[second page] stood the hardships of the day as well as in my younger days, when wandering through the mountain regions of my native home a young enthusiastic student of nature; All the pains and depressing influences engrafted upon me by a life of constant confinement, had passed away like the clouds upon the sky under the benign influences of the sun, and I am thankful to say I have spent a series of truly happy days. It just happened that I could get away with out detriment to my business intrests, finding myself materially recompensed for the time I had to spend in the prosecution of the task entrusted to me. ‑

 

I hope that with the arrival of the cooler season your strength has returned; and that you find yourself by this time in the enjoyment of good health.

 

Please tender to your esteemed Lady my best thanks for kindly remembring me; At this moment the recollection of the happy hours passes through my mind, which I was favored to spend with you now just one year ago. I hope that I shall be able to send you some objects of intrest I brought home with me; Will a few specimens of Korundum from this state be acceptable to the Cabinet of your society?

 

I remain very truly

yours

Carl Mohr To Hon. Judge G. W. Clinton!

[no note of receipt.]

 

[Cleburne Co. is on the eastern border of Alabama state due west of Atlanta, Georgia. It is crossed by the Tallapoosa River. This description of his experiences in the gold prospecting area must have brought back reminiscences of his earlier gold mining experience in 1849. It seems at first curious how many botanists also had experience in geology and mining: John Torrey in New York was chief assayer in the United States assay office in New York City and Leo Lesquereux also did geological work. A background in chemistry, such as one made in the course of the study of medicine and pharmacy would come in handy here, and the study of botany, in its medicinal aspects, would reinforce such expertise in the healing professions.]