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A Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin

 
Campus,-i (s.m.II), abl. sg. campo: a flat spot, a plain, grassland, meadow,'of any open, level land, without reference to cultivation or use, an even, flat place, a plain, field ' (Lewis & Short); cf. pratum,-i (s.n.II), abl. sg. prato: ‘meadow;’ also, a broad field or plain (Lewis & Short); a meadow is a grassland but only a pasture if cattle are allowed to feed on it; grassland; cf. ager, planities; opp. mons, collis, silva etc.; see aequor,-oris (s.n.III); see field;

- in campis siccis, lapidosis, in dry, stony plains.

- provenit ubique in campis & fruticetis Indiae occidentalis (Swartz), it comes everywhere from the fields and thickets of western India.

- campus rupestris (adj.B): in South America (campo rupestre), rocky grassland.

- crescit in campis aridis Jamaicae (Swartz), it grows in the dry plains of Jamaica.

- incolit campos saxosos Jamaicae (Swartz), it inhabits the stony fields of Jamaica.

- incolit ruderata & campos fertiles Indiae occidentalis (Swartz), it inhabits rubbishy places and fertile field of western India.

- crescit tn campis grammosis duris Jamaicae (Swartz), it grows in hard, grassy plains of Jamaica.

- incolit campos sabulosos aridos Jamaicas (Swartz), it inhabits gravelly, dry plains of Jamaica.

- incolit campos arenosos montium Jamaicae (Swartz), it inhabits the sandy meadows of the mountains of Jamaica.

- incolit vias et campos sterilissimos Indiae occidentalis (Swartz), it inhabits the roads and the most sterile [i.e. infertile] fields of western India.

- patria: in pratis et campis incultis Ohionis et Alabamae Americae sept. (Sallivant), native place: in pastures and uncultivated grasslands of [the States of] Ohio and Alabama of North America.

- in terra argilloso-calcarea agrorum et camporum sterilium per Europam (mosses; Mueller), in the calcareous-clay soil of the fields and sterile grasslands throughout Europe.

- [Hab.in summo monte Sierra Tejeda in pinguibus. Reperi etiam in campis in Sierra Nevada varietatem microcephalam primo aspectu dissimilem Marutam cotulam omnino referentem, sed caracteribus omnino congruentem et probabliter ex ariditate et dente animalium ortam (Boissier), it grows in [rich soil] on the crest of the Sierra Tejeda. I also find in the plains in the Sierra Nevada the variety microcephala, at first sight completely dissimilar to Maruta cotula, but at the waterfalls completely corresponding and it was probably originated from aridity and by the tooth of animals.

NOTE: campi rupestres, abl. pl. campis rupestribus: cerrado vegetation, “campos rupestres”, rocky outcrops, rocky slopes dominated by a grass assemblage, and riparian forests associated with these formations;

- in campis montis Dreispitz rarius occurrit (mosses; Mueller), it more rarely occurs in the grasslands of the mountain Dreispitz.

Inulopsis camporum, “The showy individuals grow over a rocky soil dominated by a grass assemblage; campus altus, high grasslands: high-elevation grasslands (campos de altitude).

Spiranthes magnicamporum, Great Plains Orchid, of the Great Plains [magnus + campus]

 

A work in progress, presently with preliminary A through R, and S, and with S (in part) through Z essentially completed.
Copyright © P. M. Eckel 2010-2017

 
 
 
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