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21.  St. Louis World's Fair.

Looking south toward Festival Hall and the eastern section of the Terrace of States. Cascades are in action in this picture. Notice view of carpet bedding. 1 5x7 in. print. 



1904

22.  St. Louis World's Fair.

System of planting along steps leading to the top of Cascade Hill. Cannas were used almost exclusively in this planting. 1 5x7 in. print. 



1904

23.  Photograph of building captioned: Washington University - 1871-1902.

 




24.  First Veiled Prophet queen's orchid bouquet.

The first Veiled Prophet queen's orchid bouquet. 2- 8 x 10 in. black and white prints. 



1924

25.  Formal Garden. Arena. 1935 Greater St. Louis Flower and Garden Show.

Missouri Botanical Garden Formal Garden display at the 1935 Greater St. Louis Flower and Garden Show. Event was held in the Arena. Paul Kohl, designer. 



1935

26.  MBG Orchid Exhibit. Arena, 1935 Greater St. Louis Flower and Garden Show.

Missouri Botanical Garden orchid exhibit at the Greater St. Louis Flower and Garden Show in 1935. The show was held inside the Arena. Paul Kohl, designer. 



1935

27.  Henry Shaw and slavery.

Upon his arrival to the United States from England in 1819 Henry Shaw was initially opposed to the idea of slavery questioning its benefit. He expressed his thoughts at the time in an 1820 letter to his mother in regards to the heated national debate about Missouri entering into the Union as a slave state. “This is truly a country of knavery, oppression, and slavery.” Slavery at the time was considered an economic institution in the southern states and Missouri, admitted to the Union in 1821 was no exception. While a merchant in St. Louis Shaw apparently had a change of opinion and began buying enslaved people beginning in 1828 and by 1853 he owned eleven slaves. Shaw sometimes hired his enslaved people out to others, they worked as farm hands, as well as performing such duties as common laborer, maids, and cooks. Between 1853 and 1855, slaves under Shaw's ownership escaped and bounty hunters charged steeply to return them. One such event is memorialized today as the Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing. Located on the banks of Mississippi River north of downtown St. Louis the Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing marks where a group of runaway slaves led by Mrs. Meachum (herself a former slave) made their bid for freedom in 1855 by crossing the river to Illinois utilizing the Underground Railroad. Unfortunately bounty hunters awaited them and along with the others four slaves belonging to Shaw were captured; Mary Meachum would be jailed. Shaw apparently divested his ownership of slaves soon after as his tax assessment for 1855 would be the last one to list slaves under property which was common practice at the time; there is no listing of them in his 1856 assessment. Unfortunately Shaw left behind no papers in which he shared his thoughts on the institution of slavery, his participation in it, nor his thoughts on the Civil War. 




28.  Aerial view of Tower Grove Park

Aerial view of Tower Grove Park taken from Tower Grove House, c.1902. 



1902

29.  Aerial view of South St. Louis

Aerial view of St. Louis from Tower Grove House. St. Louis Chronic Hospital (State Mental Hospital) in left background. Copy negative available. 



1890

30.  Flora Place (gates)

View of gate entrance to Flora Place. Also known as Flora Avenue or Flora Boulevard. COPY NEGATIVE ONLY. PRINT AVAILABLE -- SEE OVZ HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS, BOX 2. 




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