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Coreopsis lanceolata

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Kemper Code:  J880

Common Name: lanceleaf coreopsis
Zone: 4 to 9
Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Asteraceae
Missouri Native: Yes
Native Range: Central and southeastern United States
Height: 1 to 2 feet
Spread: 1 to 1.5 feet
Bloom Time: May - July   Bloom Data
Bloom Color: Yellow
Sun: Full sun
Water: Dry to medium
Maintenance: Medium


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Plant Culture and Characteristics

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  Uses:       Wildlife:   Flowers:   Leaves:   Fruit:
Hedge Suitable as annual Attracts birds Has showy flowers Leaves colorful Has showy fruit
Shade tree Culinary herb Attracts Has fragrant flowers Leaves fragrant Fruit edible
Street tree Vegetable   hummingbirds Flowers not showy Good fall color   Other:
Flowering tree Water garden plant Attracts Good cut flower Evergreen Winter interest
Gr. cover (<1') Will naturalize   butterflies Good dried flower     Thorns or spines

General Culture:

Easily grown in dry to medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun. Thrives in poor, sandy or rocky soils with good drainage. Tolerant of heat, humidity and drought. Prompt deadheading of spent flower stalks encourages additional bloom and prevents any unwanted self-seeding. Freely self-seeds, and in optimum growing conditions will naturalize to form large colonies. Plants may be cut back hard in summer if foliage sprawls or becomes unkempt. If grown in borders, division may be needed every 2-3 years to maintain robustness.

Noteworthy Characteristics:

Lanceleaf coreopsis is a Missouri native wildflower which typically grows to 2' tall and occurs in prairies, glades, fields and roadsides primarily in the Ozark region of the State. Features solitary, yellow, daisy-like flowers (1-2" diameter) with eight yellow rays (toothed at the tips) and flat yellow center disks. Flowers bloom atop slender, erect stems from spring to early summer. Narrow, hairy, lance-shaped leaves (2-6" long) appear primarily near the base of the plant in basal tufts. Lower basal leaves are mostly entire, while smaller stem leaves may be pinnately lobed. Plants in the genus Coreopsis are sometimes commonly called lanceleaf tickseed in reference to the resemblance of the seeds to ticks. Many excellent cultivars of this species are available in commerce.

Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. Can be an aggressive self-seeder. Tends to sprawl, particularly if grown in moist and/or fertile soils. Crown rot may occur if grown in moist, poorly drained soils.

Uses:

Best naturalized in native wildflower gardens, meadows or prairies. Good plant for areas with poor, dry soils. Can be effective in borders, but self-seeding tendencies must be kept in check.

Missouri Botanical Garden, 2001-2011


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