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Syringa pubescens subsp. patula 'Miss Kim'

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Kemper Code:  F800

Common Name: Manchurian lilac
Zone: 3 to 8
Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
Family: Oleaceae
Missouri Native: No
Native Range: None
Height: 4 to 9 feet
Spread: 5 to 7 feet
Bloom Time: May   Bloom Data
Bloom Color: Lilac
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low


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Plant Culture and Characteristics

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  Uses:       Wildlife:   Flowers:   Leaves:   Fruit:
Hedge Suitable as annual Attracts birds Has showy flowers Leaves colorful Has showy fruit
Shade tree Culinary herb Attracts Has fragrant flowers Leaves fragrant Fruit edible
Street tree Vegetable   hummingbirds Flowers not showy Good fall color   Other:
Flowering tree Water garden plant Attracts Good cut flower Evergreen Winter interest
Gr. cover (<1') Will naturalize   butterflies Good dried flower     Thorns or spines

General Culture:

Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun. Tolerates light shade, but best bloom is in full sun. Prefers rich, moist, somewhat neutral soils. Needs good air circulation. Prompt removal of faded flower panicles before seed set will increase bloom in the following year. Prune immediately after flowering.

Noteworthy Characteristics:

This Manchurian lilac cultivar is a compact, upright, deciduous shrub which grows 4-7' tall with a similar spread. Lavender to ice blue, sweetly fragrant, single flowers are arranged in dense, terminal clusters (panicles to 3" long) which cover this shrub in May (St. Louis). Elliptic to ovate, dark green leaves (to 5" long) turn burgundy (often attractive) in autumn. A good selection for southern climates.

Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. This lilac is considered to be a low maintenance plant with excellent resistance to powdery mildew. Young leaves and flower buds are susceptible to frost injury in spring.

Uses:

This compact cultivar has good mildew-resistant foliage and is a good selection for smaller areas. May be massed, grouped or planted as a small specimen. Good for shrub borders, foundation plantings, peripheries of borders or rock gardens.

Missouri Botanical Garden, 2001-2011


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