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Dianthus caryophyllus 'Vienna Mischung'

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Kemper Code:  Z910

Common Name: carnation
Zone: 6 to 9
Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Missouri Native: No
Native Range: None
Height: 0.75 to 1 foot
Spread: 0.5 to 0.75 feet
Bloom Time: June - July   Bloom Data
Bloom Color: Red and white (bicolor)
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low


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Plant Culture and Characteristics

Sources for this plant

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  Uses:       Wildlife:   Flowers:   Leaves:   Fruit:
Hedge Suitable as annual Attracts birds Has showy flowers Leaves colorful Has showy fruit
Shade tree Culinary herb Attracts Has fragrant flowers Leaves fragrant Fruit edible
Street tree Vegetable   hummingbirds Flowers not showy Good fall color   Other:
Flowering tree Water garden plant Attracts Good cut flower Evergreen Winter interest
Gr. cover (<1') Will naturalize   butterflies Good dried flower     Thorns or spines

General Culture:

Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun. Superior soil drainage is the key to growing these plants well. Heavy clay soils such as those present in much of the St. Louis area must be amended (e.g., add limestone, gypsum, organic matter) prior to planting. This strain is often grown from seed and treated as an annual in cold winter climates such as the St. Louis area. If grown as a perennial in St. Louis, plants should be sited in a sheltered location.

Noteworthy Characteristics:

'Vienna Mischung' is a dwarf strain of border carnations in the Grenadin Series. Features fragrant, white and red (bicolor) double-flowered carnations on stiff stems growing 10-12" tall. Narrow blue-gray foliage. Mischung translates from German as "mixed."

Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. Crown rot can be a problem in wet, poorly drained soils.

Uses:

Border fronts. Containers. Cutting gardens.

Missouri Botanical Garden, 2001-2011