MBG Home Horticulture MBG Search
Home Page
Kemper Blog
Pests
Plants of Merit
Master Search
PlantFinder Search
Search PlantFinder Names

Cornus florida 'Cherokee Princess'

(0 ratings) --- Rate this plant / Read comments

Kemper Code:  C423

Common Name: flowering dogwood
Zone: 5 to 9
Plant Type: Tree
Family: Cornaceae
Missouri Native: No
Native Range: None
Height: 15 to 30 feet
Spread: 15 to 30 feet
Bloom Time: April   Bloom Data
Bloom Color: White
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Medium


Locate this plant at MBG

Plant Culture and Characteristics

Sources for this plant

View our source(s)

High resolution image available.
  Uses:       Wildlife:   Flowers:   Leaves:   Fruit:
Hedge Suitable as annual Attracts birds Has showy flowers Leaves colorful Has showy fruit
Shade tree Culinary herb Attracts Has fragrant flowers Leaves fragrant Fruit edible
Street tree Vegetable   hummingbirds Flowers not showy Good fall color   Other:
Flowering tree Water garden plant Attracts Good cut flower Evergreen Winter interest
Gr. cover (<1') Will naturalize   butterflies Good dried flower     Thorns or spines

General Culture:

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Prefers moist, organically rich, acidic soils in part shade. Benefits from a 2-4” mulch which will help keep roots cool and moist in summer. May be inadvisable at this time to plant this tree in areas where dogwood anthracnose infestations are present (see problems section below).

Noteworthy Characteristics:

Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) is the Missouri State Tree, and arguably may be the most beautiful of the native American flowering trees. It is a small deciduous tree that typically grows 15-30’ tall with a low-branching, broadly-pyramidal but somewhat flat-topped habit. It blooms in early spring shortly after, but usually overlapping, the bloom period of the redbuds. The true dogwood flowers are actually tiny, yellowish green and insignificant, being compacted into button-like clusters. However, each flower cluster is surrounded by four showy, white, petal-like bracts which open flat, giving the appearance of a single, large, 3-4” diameter, 4-petaled, white flower. Oval, dark green leaves (3-6” long) turn attractive shades of red in fall. Bright red fruits (poisonous to humans but loved by birds) mature in late summer to early fall and may persist until late in the year. ‘Cherokee Princess’ is a cultivar that is noted for its consistently early and heavy bloom of flowers with large white bracts. Good rust-red fall color. Originally introduced in 1959-60 as C. florida ‘Sno-White’.

Problems:

Flowering dogwood, when stressed, is susceptible to a rather large number of disease problems the most serious of which is dogwood anthracnose. Although this anthracnose is not yet a serious problem in Missouri, it has caused considerable devastation in parts of the eastern U.S. Plants are also susceptible to leaf spot, crown canker, root rot and leaf and twig blight. Stressed trees also become vulnerable to borers. Leaf miner and scale are less serious potential insect pests.

Uses:

Popular as a specimen or small grouping on residential property around homes, near patios or in lawns. Also effective in woodland, bird or native plant gardens.

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 2001-2011


More photos:
  High resolution image available.
  High resolution image available.
  High resolution image available.
  High resolution image available.
  High resolution image available.